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Polish words with consecutive identical letters?


InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
19 Sep 2012  #1
For example, in English the word "letters" - it has 2 Ts in the middle of it it. "Middle" has 2 Ds, of course.

I can't really think of any Polish words like that, so can you suggest some?

I know Polish has borrowed the word "thriller" from English as I see the word on fiction book covers in Poland. But, are there any traditional Polish words where there are two identical letters used together consecutively in a proper word (zz, oo, ee or cc, etc)?

This is one I found but it's probably just a street name...
Kołłątaja
mapa.targeo.pl/Kollataja-Hugona/Wroclaw/ulica
Zibi - | 336
19 Sep 2012  #2
To name a few: lekki, miękki, dżdżysty, zza (preposition)
Ziemowit 12 | 3,486
19 Sep 2012  #3
Kołłątaj is a surname. Another surname of this kind is Jagiełło. Both are of Lithuanian origin, however.

Another example is terror -> terroryzować. The word is most probably of French or of English origin, but the two r's in it are - unlike in the English language - pronounced in Polish unless in cases when they are spoken fast.

The question is quite interesting. As for now, I can't think of any other examples.
OP InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
19 Sep 2012  #4
To name a few: lekki, miękki, dżdżysty, zza (preposition)

They're just the sort of examples I wanted, thank you. (For anyone curious, they mean: light, soft, rainy, behind)

terroryzować

That's an interesting one, thanks for that, too.
Zibi - | 336
19 Sep 2012  #5
behind)

zza - actually it means "from behind"

Here is another one: zzuć (obuwie, trzewiki) - it however sounds archaic nowadays but is still used.
Lyzko
19 Sep 2012  #6
"śsak" is another one:-)
OP InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
19 Sep 2012  #7
Mammal., says Google.

Or as ssac it means suck.

zza - actually it means "from behind"

BOTH useful ones to know.
Zibi - | 336
19 Sep 2012  #8
śsak

it's a good example: ssak, but wrong spelling (as per above). Should be double "s". And from that comes the verb: ssać, obviously.

Also, check out the meaning of: "czcze gadanie", and "na czczo".
strzyga 2 | 993
19 Sep 2012  #9
There are some words with double consonants, mostly it's a result of morphological processes where a prefix or suffix added to the stem ends or begins with the same consonant as the stem:

manna, panna, sanna, wanna, konny, ranny, poronny - na and ny are suffixes
miękki (soft) - mięk + ki
wwiercać, zziębnąć, zzuć, poddać, oddać, oddalić, wwieźć, poddać, naddać - w, z, od, pod, nad are prefixes

Kołłątaj, Radziwiłł, Jagiełło - these are names of Eastern (Lithuanian) origin

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_Kołłątaj

And of course there are borrowings: ballada, mokka (mocca), or, as you've mentioned, thriller.
OP InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
19 Sep 2012  #10
as you've mentioned, thriller.

Thanks for posting all the examples, 'tis much appreciated.
Peter Cracow
19 Sep 2012  #11
The loan-word "wasserwaga" means spirit-level, but I have never seen it on the paper. May be it is just "waserwaga" then?
strzyga 2 | 993
19 Sep 2012  #12
Some more examples: dzienny, codzienny, poranny, ścienny,
oddźwięk, oddanie,
dżdżownica
mełłem, mełłeś etc. (past tense from mleć - to mill)

also with vowels, usually as an effect of declination:
Maria - Marii
Warmia - Warmii
epidemia - epidemii

There's no oo, uu, yy, aa, ee in Polish words, the only one that I can think of is zoologia - a borrowing.
As far as consonants go, ł, k, n, s, w, z, d, cz and can double.
boletus 30 | 1,366
19 Sep 2012  #13
Some more examples: dzienny, codzienny, poranny, ścienny,

O szyby deszcz dzwoni, deszcz dzwoni jesienny
I pluszcze jednaki, miarowy, niezmienny,
Dżdżu krople padają i tłuką w me okno...
Jęk szklanny... płacz szklanny... a szyby w mgle mokną
I światła szarego blask sączy się senny...
O szyby deszcz dzwoni, deszcz dzwoni jesienny...
- Deszcz Jesienny, Leopold Staff
[Well, I exaggerated a bit changing "szklany" to "szklanny", but this is how I imagine the archaic words were created: słonny, płonny. Sounds better to me :-o]

I can't really think of any Polish words like that, so can you suggest some?

There's no oo, uu, yy, aa, ee in Polish words, the only one that I can think of is zoologia - a borrowing.

Actually, when you look hard enough there is hardly any letter that cannot be used in pairs.
oo: a bunch of words involving compounds, such as czteroosiowy, akustooptyczny, jednoosiowy. Really a lot
uu: ewaluujący, dwuuszna, instruujący, konstruując, perpetuum. Mostly adopted foreign words.
aa: ałmaacka, kanaański, zaadoptować, zaabonować, zaakceptować. A long list of zaa...
ee: deelektryzacja, deeskalacja, dee..., nieedukacyjny. A long list with niee...

And here comes a secret tool:
scrabble.krzyzowki.info

In the entry field enter the pattern: %dd% , where % stands for any number of characters, and the program will spit out a long list of the words with double "d".
Lyzko
22 Sep 2012  #14
Thanks, zibi!

Soft consonant mutations in Polish spelling are still a problem for me, apologies:-)
Zibi - | 336
22 Sep 2012  #15
are still a problem for me

you are progressing however and it shows, so please persevere there! :)
Lyzko
22 Sep 2012  #16
Kind words, zibi, and much appreciated!
strzyga 2 | 993
24 Sep 2012  #17
Actually, when you look hard enough there is hardly any letter that cannot be used in pairs.oo

You're right, as usual :) Somehow I didn't think of these compounds.


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