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The Polish word for fart?


twww189 2 | 2
16 Jul 2012  #1
Hello, all my dad's grandparents came from Poland and my own grandparents were raised in Chicago speaking polish. Unfortunately my dad didn't learn much of the language, but he always used the polish word for fart which he pronounced as boo-it-ki. I am now studying polish and looked up fart to see how it is spelled, but only came up with the word bąk and bąki which is kind of similar. Was my dad just horribly mispronouncing the word or is booitki an archaic (great grandparent's time) form?

Also now that I think of it, we used to call my dad's grandmother, my great grandmother busha. I looked up grandma in the dictionary, but only find babka or babcia. Is this another corruption from my family or are these actual words?
jasondmzk
16 Jul 2012  #2
Probably just his dialect. I've heard bąk used around my gassy 9-month old so much I've already replaced it in my head as being the proper word.
strzyga 2 | 993
16 Jul 2012  #3
boo-it-ki.

could be bączki (plural diminutive of bąk, sing. is bączek)
nunczka 8 | 458
16 Jul 2012  #4
My parents used the word.. (Pierdzuk) I suppose it depended on where you came from in Poland
ukpolska
16 Jul 2012  #5
My wife's family use the 'bonk', not sure of the Polish spelling.
ShawnH 8 | 1,497
16 Jul 2012  #7
The word pierdzi (sp?) comes to mind...?
Lyzko
16 Jul 2012  #8
"upierd" also:-)
rybnik 18 | 1,462
16 Jul 2012  #9
poo-koo
Lyzko
16 Jul 2012  #10
Sounds almost like Russian "puKAT", hilarious false cognate with Polish "to knock" (on a door etc.) "pukać"
LOL
boletus 30 | 1,366
16 Jul 2012  #11
Close, but no. "Purkać" or "prukać" are the onomatopoeic versions of the word, imitating sound of gas discharge from the bowels. It is considered less vulgar, than some other ones.

From this comes a demeaning, insulting word "prukwa" - in reference to an old, unsympathetic, unfriendly woman.

I do not believe I joined the fray. This is your fault Lyzko. :-) What is wrong with these young Americans, that make them ask questions about kisomnia dupa, etc., and not about "uduchowienie" or other such exalted words?
p3undone 8 | 1,135
16 Jul 2012  #12
boletus,I'll bite;what the hell does "udochowienie" mean,or is it too vulgar?
catsoldier 62 | 596
16 Jul 2012  #13
"udochowienie"

en.bab.la/dictionary/polish-english/uduchowienie

uduchowienie {n}............................spiritualization {noun}

the letter u instead of an o, I am not sure if there are two different words, one with an o and one with an u but that is what I found using google.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
16 Jul 2012  #14
Catsoldier,Thank you,boletus,I read too quickly,my bad.
rybnik 18 | 1,462
16 Jul 2012  #15
Sounds almost like Russian "puKAT", hilarious false cognate with Polish "to knock" (on a door etc.) "pukać"
LOL

Mom's side came from Galicia. Maybe that's why? Puku and bąki are the only words I know :)
catsoldier 62 | 596
16 Jul 2012  #16
Catsoldier,Thank you,boletus,I read too quickly,my bad.

Your welcome.
HAL9009 2 | 304
16 Jul 2012  #17
My GF uses pierdzić, which I have of course now learned!
pawian 155 | 8,618
17 Jul 2012  #18
could be bączki (plural diminutive of bąk, sing. is bączek)

On the last page of "American Boys", doesn`t one of the main protagonists say: Popieprz bąka, a bąk brzdąka.. ??
strzyga 2 | 993
17 Jul 2012  #19
and not about "uduchowienie" or other such exalted words?

I'd prefer "uwznioślenie"...

or another one, very much fancied by the CC clergy: ubogacenie.

just to give Catsoldier something to do ;)

On the last page of "American Boys", doesn`t one of the main protagonists say: Popieprz bąka, a bąk brzdąka.. ??

which one do you have in mind?
boletus 30 | 1,366
17 Jul 2012  #22
which one do you have in mind?

Seems like the toy, not the bird.

Contrary to what some respected Polish encyclopaedia (and many other second hand useless sources) say: "zbijanie bąków", "puszczanie bąka" or "strzelanie bąka" had originally nothing to do with the poor Great Bittern bird nor with the foul and loud physiological effects. The latter meaning came later in the process of imitation of the humming sound that some spinning tops were making.

Bąki, the simple lovely toys, became most popular in Poland during middle ages. Their design though was not exactly the same as the modern ones: there was no screw for propelling the toy, but the top was given the spinning motion by striking it with a little whip from the laying position until it reached enough speed to enter into the spinning and precession motions. The experts were able to maintain the motion by skillfully lashing the top from time to time - the same way as a skillful wagoner occasionally strikes his horses to maintain their speed. [Political correctness do not apply to the Middle Ages, especially in this topic]

I read somewhere that this top propelling method was still known among Polish folk before WWII. So now, here are the meanings of the phrases:

"zbijać bąki" - to strike the spinning tops
"puszczać bąki" - to start the tops
"strzelać bąki" - to crack the whip when spinning the tops

Bąk had many other names in Old Poland: cyga, kręglica, fryga, wartołka, warchołka. Andrzej Kochanowski, a nephew of the great Jan, wrote:

- Jaką po długich salach grą się bawią dzieci. W długiem kole patrzając, ta biczmi pędzona, krzywem kołem polata.

Pious £azarz Baranowicz, Archbishop of the Greek Rite of Czernihow, writing in XVII c used the metaphor of this game:

"Serce jako cyga, gdy ją zacinają

Obrót ustalon z cygi z zajęciem miewają.

Serce jak cyga nasze obrot stroi,

Pańskiego bicia jak cyga się boi."

I'd prefer "uwznioślenie"...

or another one, very much fancied by the CC clergy: ubogacenie.

just to give Catsoldier something to do ;)

How about that - was I "wzniosły" enough for you? :-)
pawian 155 | 8,618
17 Jul 2012  #23
On the last page of "American Boys", doesn`t one of the main protagonists say: Popieprz bąka, a bąk brzdąka.. ??

I tried to find the original but can`t. Who has a copy of American Boys by Steven Smith to tell us how it goes in English what Morgan says to a new soldier arriving in vietnam?
jasondmzk
17 Jul 2012  #24
You are a scary smart mthfcker, is what you are. I tell you what.
strzyga 2 | 993
17 Jul 2012  #25
How about that - was I "wzniosły" enough for you? :-)

Certainly, thanks a lot. I feel uduchowiona, uwznioślona and ubogacona :)
gumishu 11 | 4,953
17 Jul 2012  #26
Is this another corruption from my family or are these actual words?

it's short for babusia and I have seen busia's on Polish internet too
pawian 155 | 8,618
17 Jul 2012  #27
You are a scary smart mtherfcker,

Thanks! I like it! :):):):)
Mleko 1 | 20
22 Jul 2012  #28
Holy crap, I called my grandma busha too!


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