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Weekend vs Łikend


ShAlEyNsTfOh 4 | 161
23 Jul 2011 #1
I see łikend used a lot more than the English variant, but if we have Polish names for each day of the week, and words like tygodnia/tydzień to describe the whole week, why not a word for weekends? :O

Another example I like is łał! instead of wow!.. lol
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
23 Jul 2011 #2
why not a word for weekends? :O

lots of other languages don't have a specific term for the end of the week either. you can always say "koniec tygodnia" or "sobota i niedziela" if you really want to ;-p
jyjkhfa
23 Jul 2011 #4
I see łikend used a lot more than the english variant

On the contrary. It's rare to see spelling like łykend or łał. Even my browser underline those words as a mistake.
gumishu 11 | 5,017
23 Jul 2011 #5
I think many young internet users (most of the youth are internet users anyways) are not familiar with weekend - but łikend is not a dictionary word definitely - weekend is

Sobniedź, kontyg, soniela. :)

ale potworki - ugly little monsters
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098
23 Jul 2011 #6
Sobniedź, kontyg, soniela. :)

leżing and drinking happy time ;)

łykend is derived from łykać (to swallow)
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595
23 Jul 2011 #7
Weekend is officially accepted as a Polish word. £ikend etc are not.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
23 Jul 2011 #8
I see łikend used a lot more than the english variant, but if we have polish names for each day of the week, and words like tygodnia/tydzień to describe the whole week, why not a word for weekends? :O

Another example I like is łał! instead of wow!.. lol

I Agree there way to many English words being introduced into the Polish language. A Polish word can easily be made up for them.
emha - | 92
23 Jul 2011 #9
łykend is a weekend with alcohol :) łyk means draught
gumishu 11 | 5,017
23 Jul 2011 #10
Pennboy wrote but according to Admin he does not have to know anyone replied to him:
I Agree there way to many English words being introduced into the Polish language. A Polish word can easily be made up for them.

the problem weekend and parking are perfect short compact good sounding words end they fit the fabric of Polish language perfrectly - if you wanted a Polish equivalent of weekend you end up with two word multisylable phrase or some nasty contractions which look and sound pretty ugly or perhaps a strange neologism (a new word - some such neologisms did catch on in the past but many never gained any popularity) - the same goes to komputer
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595
23 Jul 2011 #11
łykend is a weekend with alcohol :) łyk means draught

I didnt think about it. But it makes sense.
PolskaMEX
14 Jun 2015 #12
Then why isn't weekend pronounced with a v instead of the Americanized English way of weekend? What word was used in place of weekend hundreds of years before English influenced the Polish language?
Wulkan - | 3,251
14 Jun 2015 #13
What word was used in place of weekend hundreds of years before English influenced the Polish language?

There wasn't
jon357 63 | 14,137
14 Jun 2015 #14
What word was used in place of weekend hundreds of years before English influenced the Polish language?

Nothing. 100 years ago the word 'weekend' didn't exist in English either.
Marsupial - | 888
14 Jun 2015 #15
People often don't realise that the weekend and many other things are a result of modern improvements in lifestyle. Before that peasants in England or indeed anywhere didn't really have much entitlement to any such time so the word didn't exist but slowly kept in as things improved. Another surprise is the.9 to 5. People forget that these hours are made.up, people used to sleep in what.we.now call weird hours and even socialise or get.up at 3 am to visit neighbours. There is lots of evidence for this. In any case both of those things are a construct of recent modernisation and so on which makes the words new. I would recommend to anyone who is interested in looking at the.hours and habits of people not so long ago you may get a shock at how un natural that seems now. Plenty.of info online, I found it very interesting


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