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Ski Or Ska? - Polish surname endings


Lina19 Activity: 1 / 2
Joined: 10 May 2010 ♀
 
10 May 2010  #1

If I marry a man with the -ski ending in his name, do I follow in the -ski name or do I become a -ska? Is there a difference in what happens depending on whether I live here in the states or in Poland?!

SeanBM Activity: 35 / 5,825
Joined: 10 Mar 2008 ♂
 
10 May 2010  #2

If I marry a man with the -ski ending in his name, do I follow in the -ski name or do I become a -ska?

You become a ''-Ska''.

All women are ''-Ska'', all men are ''-Ski''.

Is there a difference in what happens depending on whether I live here in the states or in Poland?!

I have heard the Polish surname ''-Ska'' and ''-Ski'' being used on the opposite sex in America but it is just an Americanisation.
In Poland, on the other hand, a woman is never ''-Ski'' and a man is never ''-Ska''.
Stu Activity: 12 / 524
Joined: 31 Mar 2010 ♂
 
10 May 2010  #3

I follow in the -ski name or do I become a -ska

Anywhere outside PL you stay -ski, inside PL you become -ska.
Seanus Activity: 15 / 19,763
Joined: 25 Dec 2007 ♂
 
10 May 2010  #4

Very true! Ski/Ska is a very noble name to have too. Many people get better jobs with that name ;)
OP Lina19 Activity: 1 / 2
Joined: 10 May 2010 ♀
 
10 May 2010  #5

How ridiculously confusing. I think the PL rules should be used outside of PL too. I don't like the way -ski sounds with Polish female names. Especially since my name is Paulina. Poo!
Trevek Activity: 28 / 1,708
Joined: 21 May 2008 ♂
 
10 May 2010  #6

I had a female student called -ski because she was born in USA.

I wonder if you could claim racism for that.
RubasznyRumcajs Activity: 4 / 359
Joined: 29 Mar 2008 ♂
 
10 May 2010  #7

I think the PL rules should be used outside of PL too.

no, they shouldn't. same with Polish letters- they should not be in use in other countries (i.e. in names on passports etc)

I wonder if you could claim racism for that.

you are kidding, aren't you?
Bzibzioh  
10 May 2010  #8

In US and Canada you have to keep the name of your father in his passport. The same with your husband. So if he's -ski you are ski, too. Although I meet a guy once who was -ska, probably after his mother.
delphiandomine Activity: 56 / 14,765
Joined: 25 Nov 2008 ♂
 
11 May 2010  #9

same with Polish letters- they should not be in use in other countries (i.e. in names on passports etc)

Why on earth? For example - Sigmund Jähn is Jähn, not Jahn. No reason why they shouldn't be used elsewhere too.

Q doesn't exist in the Polish alphabet, does that mean it should be dropped and replaced with Ku or Koo? Don't be silly.
pgtx Activity: 30 / 3,174
Joined: 14 Feb 2009 ♀
 
11 May 2010  #10

Although I meet a guy once who was -ska, probably after his mother.

or his mother was his father...

;)
RubasznyRumcajs Activity: 4 / 359
Joined: 29 Mar 2008 ♂
 
11 May 2010  #11

Why on earth? For example - Sigmund Jähn is Jähn, not Jahn. No reason why they shouldn't be used elsewhere too.

Nope- in passports etc documents- only letters of alphabet of country issuing it should be used. i.e.- in Poland Jähn Sigmund should be written Jahn. In England, Świętowid should be Swietowid and Miłosz should be Milosz.

and btw, Q V X exist in Polish alphabet- but usually in borrowed words (or obsoletes words, like Xiądz, Xiąże etc).

btw, I hope that you understand fact, that if you want to keep the 'original' written form, you should do it also to cyrillic, greek, hebrew, arabic and few dozens of other scripts :)?
z_darius Activity: 14 / 3,976
Joined: 18 Oct 2007 ♂
 
11 May 2010  #12

How ridiculously confusing. I think the PL rules should be used outside of PL too.

In fact, in some countries they actually do. For instance in Russia, Ukraine etc.

A Polish woman in Poland can also have the -ski ending if her last name is so registered.
plk123 Activity: 8 / 4,175
Joined: 29 Aug 2007 ♂
 
11 May 2010  #13

If I marry a man with the -ski ending in his name, do I follow in the -ski name or do I become a -ska? Is there a difference in what happens depending on whether I live here in the states or in Poland?!

it is completely up to you and your hubby.. both my mom and my sis are -ska here in the usa.
Chicago Pollock Activity: 7 / 506
Joined: 10 Apr 2010 ♂
 
11 May 2010  #14

Lina19

If I marry a man with the -ski ending in his name, do I follow in the -ski name or do I become a -ska? Is there a difference in what happens depending on whether I live here in the states or in Poland?!

In the states you can do anything in regards to your married name. You can:

Keep your maiden name

Combine your maiden and married name together with an hyphen

spell your husbands name with a ska

Have you and your husband combine your last names into one.

I've seen all of the above. This is America man.
trevek's forgot  
11 May 2010  #15

you are kidding, aren't you?

I am, but I imagine if you tried enforcing names of non-Europeans etc in the same way someone somewhere would cry "racism" and imperialism.

In fact, in some countries they actually do. For instance in Russia, Ukraine etc.

Ah, but in such cases these are not "Polish" rules but Slavonic rules which also apply in those countries.
skysoulmate Activity: 14 / 1,290
Joined: 10 Jan 2010 ♂
 
11 May 2010  #16

Keep your maiden name

Combine your maiden and married name together with an hyphen

A friend (female) told me that's a "divorce" backup. Easier to get the paper work rearranged if things don't work out. She should know, she's on her third husband... lol

A Polish woman in Poland can also have the -ski ending if her last name is so registered.

Although not as common, some men have a last name with a -ska ending as well. Why don't you get it Americanized to -sky -> very asexual. ;)

Nope- in passports etc documents- only letters of alphabet of country issuing it should be used. i.e.- in Poland Jähn Sigmund should be written Jahn...

Maybe in Polish passports but for example in the US "umlauts" are often converted to a "sound letter" instead. So å becomes aa, ä -> ae, and ö -> oe. Ü would be ue. At least my passport uses that solution.
delphiandomine Activity: 56 / 14,765
Joined: 25 Nov 2008 ♂
 
11 May 2010  #17

btw, I hope that you understand fact, that if you want to keep the 'original' written form, you should do it also to cyrillic, greek, hebrew, arabic and few dozens of other scripts :)?

Sure, why not? The biometric passports should allow the ability for it to be transliterated on the border guards screen anyway, so it's no issue.

Incidentally - I can't say for certain, but aren't Polish ID cards containing proper letters?
Wawel Activity: - / 14
Joined: 9 Feb 2010 ♂
 
11 May 2010  #18

Do last names ending in sky denote jewish heritage , or are there Polish last names ending in sky?
Trevek Activity: 28 / 1,708
Joined: 21 May 2008 ♂
 
11 May 2010  #19

A friend (female) told me that's a "divorce" backup. Easier to get the paper work rearranged if things don't work out. She should know, she's on her third husband... lol

I don't know but I wonder if it also stems from inheritance laws and female bloodlines.
plk123 Activity: 8 / 4,175
Joined: 29 Aug 2007 ♂
 
12 May 2010  #20

Why don't you get it Americanized to -sky

Do last names ending in sky denote jewish heritage , or are there Polish last names ending in sky?

not jewish but russian or possibly slovak or czech.

Incidentally - I can't say for certain, but aren't Polish ID cards containing proper letters?

polish ones, for sure..
Lyzko  
12 May 2010  #21

Chances are, certain family names ending in '-ski' or -'sky' may well be "Jewish" surnames, especially in New York City or Boston, such as 'Slominski', 'Bilsky' etc... In Chicago however, the US city with the largest Polish, i.e. Polish Roman Catholic, immigrant population, 'Slominsky', especially 'Slovinski' or 'Malevich' for example, will more than likely be a Polish gentile name.

As Jews tended to adopt as a last name the town near the shtetl where they happened to be living at the time, it's no surprise the preponderance of "Jewish-sounding" families with '-ski' at the end.

Other '-ski' names such as 'Kaczynski' in the US are almost assuredly NOT Jewish.
1jola Activity: 14 / 1,898
Joined: 23 Sep 2008 ♂
 
12 May 2010  #22

You can make a generalization that in the US -sky are Polish Jews. It would be very unusual for ethnic Poles to change their name from-ski to -sky but very ususal for Jews to do so.
Lyzko  
12 May 2010  #23

You may be right about that, 1Jola.

Zresztą często przeznaje się nazwiska polskie żydowskiego pochodzenia z źródł niemieckich, n pr. 'Heller', 'Lautermann', 'Sznajder' > Schneider itd....

Mam tu rację?
Bzibzioh  
12 May 2010  #24

przeznaje się

poznaje się

z źródł

ze źródeł

n pr

np (na przykład)

Jewish names of German origin have a specific character. Often they have typical root like 'gold' or 'silver' (Silverman, Goldstein), 'berg' (Bergman, Rosenberg), 'stein' (Steinberg), 'feld' (Seinfeld, Feldman)
Lyzko  
12 May 2010  #25

Tak, to prawda! Dziękuję też za poprawienia:-)

Interesting perhaps though, that numerous gentile Germans also bear names such as 'Steinfeld', 'Bergmann', 'Kaufmann', even 'Rosenbaum' or 'Goldberg'-:)))

Are there large numbers of Christian Poles with 'Jewish-sounding' family names?
1jola Activity: 14 / 1,898
Joined: 23 Sep 2008 ♂
 
12 May 2010  #26

Not one Silvermański, but there are many German names.
MareGaea Activity: 29 / 2,772
Joined: 6 Feb 2008 ♂
 
12 May 2010  #27

In US and Canada you have to keep the name of your father in his passport.

Not only there. In Western Europe as well. Only if you don't know the name of the father, you can use your mom's maidenname if she doesn't carry her husband's name.

I think the sex-related endings of last names -i and -a are a typical phenomaena in Slavic languaged countries. In Czech they add with every woman -va at her last name, I heard even when it's a foreign celebrity. Jennifer Lopez would become Jennifer Lopezova. :) At least, that's what my Czech and Slovak friends tell me.

I haven't seen it in any of the Germanic languaged countries, with the exception of Iceland where they differenciate between -dottir and -son for a daughter and a son. Can't remember if the last name is also sex-related as where it concerns the composition of it, for example if a girl would take her mom's first name, add "dottir" to it and the son takes his father's first name and add "son" to it, so you would get Peter Svensson, who would be the brother of Ingrid Gudrunsdottier. Indeed, brother and sister can have complete different last names and different from their parents names and even different from their kid's names.

In short: Sven Petersson and Gudrun Monikadottir have two kids, named Peter Svensson and Ingrid Gudrunsdottir and one grandchild: Jacob Petersson. I wouldn't want to be a postman in Iceland :)

As for Jewish names, "Polak", "Cohen" and "Grunberg" are the most common Jewish last names in NL.

>^..^<

M-G (loves Iceland though)
Bzibzioh  
12 May 2010  #28

(loves Iceland though)

But does Iceland love you, Maregański?
MareGaea Activity: 29 / 2,772
Joined: 6 Feb 2008 ♂
 
12 May 2010  #29

I think it does. I asked for a volcano to disrupt airtraffic in Europe and voila.

>^..^<

M-G (been to Iceland quite a few times)
trev4got  
12 May 2010  #30

Jewish names of German origin have a specific character. Often they have typical root like 'gold' or 'silver' (Silverman, Goldstein), 'berg' (Bergman, Rosenberg), 'stein' (Steinberg), 'feld' (Seinfeld, Feldman)

Jewish names also tend to use one 'n', whereas 'German' names tend to use two. Feldman/Feldmann.




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Ski Or Ska? - Polish surname endings
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