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have a sip - Chcesz łyka?


dbfulano 3 | 4
15 Feb 2010  #1
a quick question on the word: łyk

Chcesz łyka? - "want a sip?"

is łyk żywotne? have some nice reference books but alas. inaczej mówiąc, czemu "łyka" and not "łyk"?

thanks!
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Feb 2010  #2
Wouldn't it be 'Chcesz łyką?'
Ziemowit 12 | 3,505
15 Feb 2010  #3
is łyk żywotne? have some nice reference books but alas. inaczej mówiąc, czemu "łyka" and not "łyk"?

This problem - along with many others - has been discussed on PF more than once. People just don't bother to use the search engine.

Wouldn't it be 'Chcesz łyką?'

Excellent! I've been laughing for about ten minutes as this inevitably associates in one's mind with "Chcesz łychą?". [Not that I would like to offend anyone, but looks like a jolly good piece of advice for those not wanting to use the search engine here.]
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Feb 2010  #4
Chcesz łychą? Hmm...I guess it's sth sexual though I'm unsure.

Yeah, please use the Checker or Search Engine facility to avoid repetition. You should find answers therein.
strzyga 2 | 993
16 Feb 2010  #5
Chcesz łychą? Hmm...I guess it's sth sexual though I'm unsure.

Nothing sexual, not this time ;) It's: do you want to get hit with a big spoon? preferably over your head... and preferably with a real big wooden one...

don't mess with your missus when she's cooking bigos :)
learn polish - | 46
16 Feb 2010  #6
"chcesz łyka?" is very much used and alive.

Btw, "łycha" is also colloquially used to refer to whiskey (although rarely, I suppose), so "chcesz łychą" might not only be an offer of hitting your interlocutor with a spoon, but also of spilling whiskey on them :)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
16 Feb 2010  #7
Aha, thanks for the warning! :) I'll be sure to avoid that.
TIT 5 | 211
16 Feb 2010  #8
Seanus

how can you be for such a long time in Poland and do basic mistakes or dont know the words?
£ycha is A big spoon , łyzka is A spoon, every pole who goes to English speaking country knows these things, you are staying 5 years in Poland , have polish wife, be a teacher and be such an ignorant?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
16 Feb 2010  #9
You mean 'make' basic mistakes? LOL I'll take that as a joke, moron! I am fairly fluent in Polish and many who have lived here for 5 years aren't. Just because I don't know łycha means nothing. I know łyżka and łyżeczka, not łyzka by the way. poles don't move by themselves, Poles do.

I have never formally learned Polish with any regularity and still I can communicate fluently with natives. Please tell me how that is?

I know sb who has lived here for 16 years, had a Polish wife and GF and hardly knows the basics. Go and bug him.

Oh, please tell me how I sit in on meetings which are conducted in Polish at my school and understand everything!? You've been listed, jackass, and we'll see how good your schooling in English was. Oh, I don't know the word for handlebar in Japanese and I often used a bike. I know enough to speak and use the language well. Care to explain!?

Oh, please don't think I'm unkind. I'm an award-winning teacher at the top of his game. So, here's a freebie. It's don't, not dont. Just let me know if you want private lessons and I'll fix you right up, buster.
Harry
16 Feb 2010  #10
I know sb who has lived here for 16 years, had a Polish wife and GF and hardly knows the basics. Go and bug him.

That can't be me: I've only been here for 15 years and I've never had a wife!
time means 5 | 1,310
16 Feb 2010  #11
I've only been here for 15 years

You must really hate the place Harry (as quite a few people try to point out lol)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
16 Feb 2010  #12
Not you, Harry, no. A guy who has lived in this city for all that time. Getting called ignorant by a Paweł, LOL. That really made my day. I've seen much of the world and like to think of myself as very open-minded but, more importantly, that's how others see me.

TIT is likely the kind of fool that I correct in his own language. A prime example would be poszłem instead of poszedłem. Keep suckling the teet, tit.
Harry
16 Feb 2010  #13
You must really hate the place Harry

I can not stand it!

Getting called ignorant by a Paweł, LOL.

It's pawel (it is pronounced with an l not a ł).
TIT 5 | 211
16 Feb 2010  #14
I correct in his own language. A prime example would be poszłem instead of poszedłem. Keep suckling the teet, tit.

yeah I know you know more Polish than average Pole and definitely more than me. Your 'making' "chcesz łyką" as want a sip made my brain fry, what is the fcukig going on, its like some Pole in UK would try to make such thing just because something sounds a bit similar, just like saying my circus of friends instead of circle of friends. People complain that Poles dont know English in UK and here we have a teacher who made such a basic mistake

Never heard during your 5 years stay 'chcesz łyka'?. Even in pub or home?
Ziemowit 12 | 3,505
16 Feb 2010  #15
Seanus
You seem to have lost your nerve, but you're right: no one should be called an ignorant for making even the very basic mistakes in a language that is not his mother tongue. Perhaps TIT has been critisizing you on friendly terms, "reproaching" you in a deliberately exaggerated way (I don't know, it might be attributed to a certain difference in mentality between the two cultures, Polish and British?).

By the way, the proper use of definite/indefinite articles gives away even those Poles whose command of English is pretty good. In the case of our friend TIT,

every pole who goes to English speaking country knows ...

it would be the ommision of "an" before "English speaking country" or am I wrong?
-----------------
P.S. I've been posting this before I've seen the preceding post of TIT.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
16 Feb 2010  #16
You are right. The articles are the absolute basics, e.g a chair is one chair, yet still I see higher level students say things like 'a chairs'. Where is the teaching in schools? I learned the French le and la very early on in my French classes.

TIT, it's the simple fact that a 'ł' was used, thus implying the intention to use diacritics, and ą wasn't. Tell me, why use one and not the other?

What does karnąć się mean? I have heard 'do you want a sip?', yes. It wasn't a new word for me, like macha. Some words people know, some they don't. I might have guessed that łycha was some kind of spoon but I prefer łyżka and łyżeczka.

I still don't see any mistakes that I made. I haven't lost my nerve, I just feel that he can't criticise. If he wants to play that game with a language he learned, I'll oblige. He couldn't get near the academic level of writing I did throughout my 5 years of university but, then again, I don't expect him to.

Would he like an article lesson I wonder? :)
TIT 5 | 211
16 Feb 2010  #17
chcesz łyką instead chcesz łyka still don't see mistake?
try pronounce these two words - łyka and łyką, still no different?
these two sound completely different and chcesz łyka is a very common sentence. I would be in trouble if spell beach and bitch incorrectly
Seanus 15 | 19,706
16 Feb 2010  #18
Well, I would normally say 'łyka chcesz?' but that's just personal preference.

Poles often omit the ą and ę in speaking or maybe accentuate it for a laugh, e.g idę but most say ide.

'I would be in trouble if I spelled (AmE) or spelt' (BrE), it's the present subjunctive or 2nd conditional.

Good attempt at a mixed conditional though ;) Do you know what a mixed conditional is?
TIT 5 | 211
16 Feb 2010  #19
it's the present subjunctive or 2nd conditional.

I have no bloody idea what you are talking about, I just pick random tense and see how it looks
Seanus 15 | 19,706
16 Feb 2010  #20
Well, each to their own ;) ;) Pick a random tense. Why do you not use a and an?

Tell me, is there a difference between 'it's the sh*t' and 'it's sh*t'? How about time and the time?
Ziemowit 12 | 3,505
16 Feb 2010  #21
I have no bloody idea what you are talking about, I just pick random tense and see how it looks

... randomly a tense ... , I think
Seanus 15 | 19,706
16 Feb 2010  #22
I just pick randomly a tense is bad word order, Ziemowit. I just pick a random tense is better
TIT 5 | 211
16 Feb 2010  #23
I've never said that I am perfect
Is this exam or what?

You have a Polish speaking person 24 h and make a silly mistakes
time means 5 | 1,310
16 Feb 2010  #24
I've never said that I am perfect



  • this ones for you TIT
mafketis 20 | 7,245
16 Feb 2010  #25
Seanus, 'chcesz łyką' is nonsense. It could only make sense if łyka were a feminine adjective.
Chcieć usually governs the accusative and the only accusatives ending in -ą are feminine singular (nouns ending in -ni and all adjectives).

łyk = facultatively animate masculine noun, that means that for the accusative, either

Chcesz łyk?

Chcesz łyka?

Are both technically correct, but the second is far, far more frequent and the first is liable to strike many natives as incorrect (although it technically is okay, just not idiomatic).
Seanus 15 | 19,706
16 Feb 2010  #26
Is this an exam? No, it isn't. Did you skip English classes at school? Learning the indefinite articles should be learned in the first few classes.

Who is ignorant now? I just told you above that we use 'a' for one, yes, one thing. Did they teach you the meaning of one at school? If so, why do you persist in using 'a' with plural nouns. A silly mistakes? WTF? A silly mistake or silly mistakes. Not so hard really. Go and ask Nergal from Behemoth, he is Polish and will teach you. He's awesome!

What makes you think that I speak Polish with her? She speaks English quite fluently but uses Polish. I understand everything she says so reply in English.

She does work so 24h is just crap! To errr (sic) is human! You've never made a silly mistake? Look at people who have, many at the top of their sports/trade. Boruc, Kasparov, take your pick as almost all of them have.

Mafketis, I was being silly. I learned such things years ago but you'd only know that to ask me in person. Anyone can prepare stuff for writing a post or not come across correctly.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,505
16 Feb 2010  #27
I just pick randomly a tense is bad word order, Ziemowit.

Is "I just randomly pick a tense" better?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
16 Feb 2010  #28
Yes, for sure. The adverb before the bare infinitive.
mafketis 20 | 7,245
16 Feb 2010  #29
The adverb before the bare infinitive.

uh .... pick is not an infinitive here (just sayin')
Seanus 15 | 19,706
16 Feb 2010  #30
Please explain why not. It's the infinitive without to, i.e the bare infinitive. The present simple form then. There is no auxiliary so I'll grant you that.

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