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Polish Polka Music: Question About A Common Phrase


Glarryg 1 | 1
21 Mar 2009 #1
Believe it or not, I'm an aficianado of contemporary polka music, particularly Chicago-style polkas which tend to feature musicians of Polish descent. Likewise, they sing a lot of songs in Polish (some original, some apparently older folk tunes). I find these tunes quite interesting and fun to sing.

Although I don't speak Polish, I've taught myself to read it fairly well using a few books and a good deal of ear training with the music I own. A phrase that seems to come up often is "oj dana." Translation websites haven't helped me figure out its meaning ("given oj?"), so I'm guessing it's some sort of slang term. Does anyone know what it would mean in the context of a sing? If it helps, the phrase is often sung by the background singers, often in response to the lead singer.

Thanks,
Glarryg
chi 1 | 33
21 Mar 2009 #2
"oj dana."

the phrase is often sung by the background singers, often in response to the lead singer.

In traditional folk music/ songs...
Chorus line (formal refrain) – refrain, usually not relevant to the lyrics. It can even be a repetition of sounds with no significance, eg.:
• oj, dana, dana
• danaż moja, dana
• hop, dziś, dziś
• rym, cym, cym
• fik-mik; fiku-miku
• a-a-a; ojra, ojra; uha-ha
Eurola 4 | 1,906
21 Mar 2009 #3
Eddy Blazonczyk fan? :)

youtube.com/watch?v=G9c7llJy9t8&feature=related
McCoy 27 | 1,275
21 Mar 2009 #4
christ, what a crap

Chicago-style polkas which tend to feature musicians of Polish descent.

polka is a czech music

The name comes from the Czech word půlka - literally, "little half" - a reference to the short half-steps featuring in the dance. The word's familiar form has been influenced by the similarity to the Czech word polka, meaning "Polish woman".[1] The name has led to the dance's origin being sometimes mistakenly attributed to Poland.

stop associate this stuff with Poland
Eurola 4 | 1,906
21 Mar 2009 #5
Hey, the 'crap" made him lots of money, you know.
Just because you don't like it it does not mean it's crap. Stick to rap if you prefer and let others enjoy what they like. I don't much care for it myself, but it's sure fun to watch the people who do!
McCoy 27 | 1,275
21 Mar 2009 #6
it's sure fun to watch the people who do!

ive never enjoyed watching any kind of retardation

Hey, the 'crap" made him lots of money, you know.

thats for sure. the more crappy music is the more people enjoy it. i'm 200% sure that there are more folks who know about Britney Spears than Jeff Buckley
OP Glarryg 1 | 1
22 Mar 2009 #7
polka is a czech music... stop associate this stuff with Poland

I'm well aware of that, but several other cultures (German, Dutch, Swiss, American, and Mexican, to name some) have their own styles of polka. Chicago style-- since the name was apparently not a giveaway-- isn't from Poland, either; when I said "musicians of Polish descent," I meant that the people who play the music came from families that once lived in Poland. You know, descendants of Polish people.

And, yes, Eurola, I'm a Versatones fan, but most of what I listen to comes from slightly father east, around Lake Erie.

Also, thanks, Chi.

Glarryg
Eurola 4 | 1,906
22 Mar 2009 #8
ive never enjoyed watching any kind of retardation

And I've never enjoyed reading any kind of retardation.
I'd rather listen to the sound of Tibetan bells on CD or African Tam Tams.
mosscode98 - | 1
21 Jan 2010 #9
Yeah
Nice to hear that somebody else is a Daddy Blaz fan too.
Billy B.


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