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Writing a novel set in XVII Century Poland; Input Requested


Kazansky 1 | 1    
2 May 2018  #1
Hi there! So like the title says, I'm writing a novel in which a large part of it is set in Poland the 17th century. If you can, would someone be able to help me figure out some made-up names for Polish villages and perhaps check the grammar of the Polish sentences I've used so far? So far I have

Czy to twój zamek? (Is this your castle?)
and
Nie. Ten zamek należy do mojego ojca. (No. This castle belongs to my father.)
kaprys 1 | 1,355    
2 May 2018  #2
Your Polish sentences are ok.
As for names of villages, anything with Wólka (=hamlet) will do. There are also tens of places called Kamionka (from kamień-stone, rock), Zalesie (behind the forest, Dąbrowa (where oaks grow) or simply Nowa Wieś (New Village - apparently the most popular name with 133 villages called like that). Names derived from from first names like Janów, Józefów or a real village but you'd have to do some research.

Remember that the 17th century was one of the most turbulent times in the Polish history - lots of conflicts and wars.
Tlum 10 | 144    
22 May 2018  #3
The sentences are correct, but would they be understood / valid in the 17th century? Probably they would get the meaning but language usage was probably a little different than it is today.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,109    
22 May 2018  #4
Ten zamek należy do mojego ojca.

I doubt anyone in the 17th century would say that. I think they would have said: "Ten zamek jest mojego ojca". The phrase "należeć do" seems to be way too modern.

Also, you may ask: "Czy to Waści zamek?" with 'Waść' corresponding to the modern form "Pan".
mafketis 16 | 6,314    
22 May 2018  #5
what about waćpan?
Tlum 10 | 144    
22 May 2018  #6
I'd expect they would use more shortcuts (rather than "Ten zamek należy do mojego ojca" it might be something like "Ten zamek moja ojcowizna" :)
Ziemowit 12 | 3,109    
23 May 2018  #7
what about waćpan?

Yes, of course: "Czy to Waćpana zamek?".

"Czy to zamek Waszmości?" - will do as well as another one: "Czy to zamek Waszeci?".
kaprys 1 | 1,355    
23 May 2018  #8
Reading the Trilogy by Sienkiewicz should help.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,109    
23 May 2018  #9
Personally, I hate it. To me, Henryk Sienkiewicz was the 19th century version of Ilona Łepkowska ...
kaprys 1 | 1,355    
23 May 2018  #10
You seem to agree with my Polish teacher. Still the dialogues there are what Polish people think Polish sounded like in the 17th century.
OP Kazansky 1 | 1    
7 Jun 2018  #11
Merged:

A Novel Set in XVII Century Poland and Eastern Europe



So I just published a novel about mercenary company that tries to stop a Polish lord from restarting Zygmunt III's war with Gustavus Adolphus. There's sword fighting, romance, and winged hussars involved!

amazon.com/Talbot-Company-Story-War-Suffering-ebook/dp/B07DJ34B2Q/ - Take a look at the book on Amazon if it interests you.
TheWizard - | 322    
7 Jun 2018  #12
Wow this is cool. Nice one!


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