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Does Polish have a plural of "You"?


citizen67 6 | 191
4 Feb 2013  #1
Does Polish hav a plural of "You"?

I hav noticed in my life and travels as well as living in England, that English has many flaws, many things missing, for an example, a plural of "You", a gender neutral third person SINGULAR word, What words phrases do you hav in Polish that are a big improvement on English, better than English, would you introduce to English? do you, for example, a plural of "YOU"?
Lenka 2 | 1,422
4 Feb 2013  #2
Yes- Wy
OP citizen67 6 | 191
4 Feb 2013  #3
and what's the singular?

is this a formal/informal distinction as in French and some other languages?

Would you like /find it easier if English had a plural of "You"?
Lenka 2 | 1,422
4 Feb 2013  #4
and what's the singular?

Ty.

is this a formal/informal distinction as in French and some other languages?

Ty and Wy are informa.In formal way you addres ppl
Pan-male singular
Pani-female singular
Państwo-plual
Lyzko
4 Feb 2013  #5
Citizen,

Polish has "wy" for the informal, "państwo" (ladies and gents) for the formal, plus the respective permutations required:

Are you [guys all] from Poland? = Czy JESTEŚCIE są z Polski?
We'll swing by you tomorrow! = Jutro przyjdziemy do WAS!
I miss y'all! = Tęsknię za WAMI!
Are you from the Polish mission? = Czy PAŃSTWO są ze Stałego Przedstawicielstwa Rzeczpospolity Polskiej?
May I help you? = Czy mogę PAŃSTWU pomagać?

BIG BOOBOO!!

"Czy JESTEŚCIE z Polski?" is the first sentence-)

Typo
OP citizen67 6 | 191
4 Feb 2013  #6
In English speaking countries you will notice there is a grasping towards having a plural of "You", usually not accepted as acceptable English, in Ireland you got, following grammatical logic, "Yous" , in the Southern States of American, they hav "Y'all", in cockney London they hav "You Lot". Was you surprised by the lack of a plural in English when you first came across it, people?
Lenka 2 | 1,422
4 Feb 2013  #7
It was difficult when I was supposed to talk to an older person (lack of formal form) . It just seemed so rude. But the singular/plural wasn't so difficult.
Lyzko
5 Feb 2013  #8
Englsih of course had "thee" and "thou" > OE "thu" for the intimate singular with "ye" for the generic plural, well up until the end of Chaucer! ME (Middle English) used such, only Shakespeare was among the first in English to experiment with "you" in both singular and plural, polite AND familiar:-) Certain modern British dialects employ the former, but it's quite archaic and mostly confined to Geordie and/or North Country slang at best. Ulster Scots and certain Irish variants employ it too, I'm told (yet not Welsh English.
f stop 25 | 2,513
5 Feb 2013  #9
ja - I
ty - you (singular)
on, ona, ono - he, she, it

my - us
wy - you (plural)
oni, one - they (male, female)
OP citizen67 6 | 191
5 Feb 2013  #10
Are you English, Lyzko? you seem hav an incredibly intimate knowledge of English to know stuff like that? Yes, you are right there is still the archaic, "Ye", which I hav heard mostly from Irish people, maybe we English should bring it back.
jon357 63 | 14,122
5 Feb 2013  #11
Englsih of course had "thee" and "thou"

Still does in some parts of the country.

North Country slang

Very, very far from slang.
OP citizen67 6 | 191
5 Feb 2013  #12
Which is which, Jon? Which is the plural and which is the singular? "Thee", "Thou".
Ziemowit 12 | 3,495
5 Feb 2013  #13
Aren't they just ancient cases of the singular "you" (nominative and dative)?

What does the "you" originate from: singular or plural? If you know a bit of Gernan, you will know: compare the German "ihr" with the English "ye".
Suwka - | 21
5 Feb 2013  #14
May I help you? = Czy mogę PAŃSTWU pomagać?

Czy mogę wam/państwu pomóc?
OP citizen67 6 | 191
5 Feb 2013  #15
More background info for me:

Are you* Polish people glad you* hav a plural of "You"?

Does it make life easier?

(*straight away it shows the need for a plural of "You", i think)

Ziemowit, you are right they are archaic words, not quite slang more a vernacular of a particular area
Ziemowit 12 | 3,495
5 Feb 2013  #16
The plural "you" in Polish isn't as important as in Russian or French, for example. They use their plural "you" as a polite form to address a singular individual! In that respect they tend to approach the pattern of English language. When the French say "vous êtes", they may be saying it to one person only or to more people.

It is true that I myself "internally" asociate "you" more with the singular than with the plural. Addressing an elderly person in English, I am inclined to think that I am saying "ty" rather than "wy" to them, so I am inclined to "judge" myself being a little impolite. And that is an obvious impact of my native Polish on me in which language I have the distinctive singular and the distinctive plural at my disposal. It is possible, however, that I could have avoided that association, had I previously learned to link "you" to the plural rather than to the singular form, such a form in fact being "genetically" plural in English, as it was the singular which borrowed "you" from the plural and not vice versa.
Richfilth 6 | 415
5 Feb 2013  #18
citizen67, "you" in English is the plural. We don't have a singular "you" any more (except for certain Northern English regions that cling to thee/thou, especially around Lancaster). However, since "you" is doing a double job there is an emergence of "y'all" and "you guys" to perform the plural function.

Every other European language has a singular-plural distinction here, and it's often referred to as the T-V distinction:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-V_distinction

Where Polish differs is that it uses a very formal system alongside its T-V system. Whereas French for example will use plural you ("vous") for singular you ("tu") for politeness, Polish will use Pan/Pani (Sir/Madam), as a British shop keeper would do before WW2. "How is Madam today? Did Madam have a good weekend?". A plural form of that, "Panstwo", (Ladies and Gentleman, almost), allows a group of people to be referred to politely. You'd only use plural you ("wy") for a group of friends or colleagues.
Peter-KRK
5 Feb 2013  #19
incredibly intimate knowledge of English to know stuff like that

"intimate knowledge"? I believe that many people in Poland wonder why English people are so rude with their "YOUU" towards strangers. They try to find the reason and learn.

I.e. they can find things like this: "Thy Hand, O God, has guided, Thy flock..."

What words phrases (...) would you introduce to English?

I.e. instead saying: "You was very nice for me tonight Candy-candy." you can say it in Polish manner: "Lady, she was very nice for me tonight lady Candy-candy."

Correct:

What words phrases (...) would you introduce to English?

I.e. instead saying: "You were very nice for me tonight Candy-candy." you can say it in Polish manner: "Lady, she was very nice for me tonight lady Candy-candy."
Lyzko
5 Feb 2013  #20
No, I'm not English. Lived there for a stretch though!

Thank you, Suwka:-) Ought to have remembered miniscule in generic greetings, majescule with first or last namesLOL
OP citizen67 6 | 191
5 Feb 2013  #21
if you hav a plural of "You", you must hav a plural of the possessive case of "You", as in English, "Yours". do you?
Lenka 2 | 1,422
5 Feb 2013  #22
Wasze- plural
Twoje-singular
kpc21 1 | 763
8 Feb 2013  #23
Are you from the Polish mission? = Czy PAŃSTWO są ze Stałego Przedstawicielstwa Rzeczpospolity Polskiej?

Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej. "Rzecz pospolita" from "Res publica". Or Rzeczpospolitej, but I would use it rather for the newspaper called "Rzeczpospolita":

Rzeczpospolita newspaper
Lyzko
9 Feb 2013  #24
Thanks!
polonius 54 | 420
10 Feb 2013  #25
Middle English had ye as in 'God rest ye merry gentlemen.' Why the Anglos got rid of it, who knows?! And one is a gender neutral third person sing. as in: 'One should mind one's manners.'
OP citizen67 6 | 191
10 Feb 2013  #26
And one is a gender neutral third person sing. as in: 'One should mind one's manners.'

"One", is a number. It doesn't work for ordinary English speakers.
OP citizen67 6 | 191
10 Feb 2013  #28
I'v never heard a North American or working-class person use it.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
10 Feb 2013  #29
if you were to check my posts you would find that i often use it.
OP citizen67 6 | 191
10 Feb 2013  #30
I'm not checking your posts.


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