The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Language  % width posts: 17

Does this phrase mean anything to you in Polish? "Up to you" while drinking.


pmatejcek 1 | 3
12 Mar 2015 #1
Jak se mate.

My own heritage is mainly Bohemian, but my wife is 100% died-in-the-wool Polish. Both of her parents (but not all of her aunts and uncles!) were born in the USA. When I would drink with my father-in-law, he would 'salute,' saying "Up to you." He never knew what it meant! He was just mimicking something that his own long-passed father used to say. Does this phrase sound like some actual Polish phrase that might be recited before downing a shot? I'm thinking that it could be a transliteration that has been repeated for years, with accuracy decreasing with each repetition -- kind of like the guy who raises his glass and says, "Nice driveway."

I know that my wife and her sisters will be delighted to learn whether this phrase is somehow linked to some general Polish custom.

Thanks in advance,

Paul in Wisconsin
Wulkan - | 3,251
12 Mar 2015 #2
he was saying "Na zdrowie"
Szenk88HTAFC 2 | 47
12 Mar 2015 #3
Died in the wool Pole but couldn't recognise na zdrowie, even when badly pronounced?
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
12 Mar 2015 #4
Shouldn't it have been "dyed" in the wool? Only someone allergic to fleece might get a severe attack and actually die in the wool!
kpc21 1 | 763
12 Mar 2015 #5
In terms of the meaning, the phrase "Na zdrowie" is usually said when somebody coughs. An equivalent of the English "Bless you".

Another, less popular usage, is by meals, as something like "Bon apetit". But in this case, there is another, much more popular one: "Smacznego".
OP pmatejcek 1 | 3
13 Mar 2015 #6
I don't know who edited the title of my post, but it would have been better if s/he had read it first. *I* did not make Na zdrowie part of the subject. Thanks to those who responded -- and ditto about reading the post. "Up to you" does not sound anything like Na zdrowie. I am familiar with Na zdrowie; I always respond with Na zdar.

When I would drink with my father-in-law, he would 'salute,' saying "Up to you." He never knew what it meant! He was just mimicking something that his own long-passed father used to say. Does this phrase sound like some actual Polish phrase that might be recited before downing a shot?

I really thought this was a place that could be helpful. Instead, it seems to be another place where people shoot from the hip, looking for a chance to attack and critique.

Disappointed,

Paul
Wulkan - | 3,251
13 Mar 2015 #7
"Up to you" does not sound anything like Na zdrowie.

??? Of course it doesn't, "Up to you" is an English phrase so why would it sound like "na zdrowie"? "Nice driveway" sounds like "na zdrowie" which is what you said.

I always respond with Na zdar.

wtf is "Na zdar"?
Szalawa 3 | 248
13 Mar 2015 #8
Well I am not familiar with the Czech language,but based on the op's original statement, I presume it was Czech, and I was correct after a quick Google search. Wulkan, don't be so mean to new posters, save that for the old geezer squad. I actually feel like the mod who the poster claims changed his title owes him an apology, it really lead this thread on a train wreck even if it might actually be the answer.

The poster wants to know the equivalent words(in Polish I presume) that translate to "up to you" and is said when having a drink, sadly I can not answer this as I have never heard anything like that. But maybe the guy who says "up to you" thinks that is what na zdrowie is. Just my perception.
OP pmatejcek 1 | 3
13 Mar 2015 #9
Szalawa, thanks for trying to makes sense of this, and for showing some compassion. Let me try one more time to explain the circumstance and ask the question.

My father-in-law, peace be upon him, was the youngest of 10 siblings. He was born in Chicago. His older siblings were born in Poland. When I would drink with my father-in-law, he would hoist his glass and say, "Up to you." When I asked him what it meant, he said that he really didn't know, that it was something that his father used to say when he drank.

My guess is that his father, born in Poland circa 1880, and who did not especially speak English, never said, "Up to you." Instead, I believe that he was probably speaking a phrase in Polish that sounded like "up to you." So what I've been wondering is whether there is a phase in Polish that sounds like "up to you," that would make sense in context.

I am truly sorry that I asked. But, having come this far, I thought I'd make another attempt at explaining.
Wulkan - | 3,251
13 Mar 2015 #10
I thought I'd make another attempt at explaining.

Well, after your first try the second attempt was a must indeed.

So what I've been wondering is whether there is a phase in Polish that sounds like "up to you," that would make sense in context.

There is nothing I can think of.
Unja - | 8
14 Mar 2015 #11
"Does this phrase mean anything to you in Polish? "Up to you" while drinking."

Up to you - it's a toast and means:
za ciebie/ za twoje zdrowie = (up) to you/ to your health
Lyzko 24 | 6,759
14 Mar 2015 #12
As opposed to the English idiom "It's up to you.", meaning "You alone must decide."?

We have the expression in the States, "Bottoms up!", meaning "Cheers!" (not in the UK formula for "Thank you!" in certain contextsLOL)

A gentleman I once knew had always though the expression was "Bottles up!". Not a completely insane confusion either:-)
OP pmatejcek 1 | 3
14 Mar 2015 #13
Thanks so much, Unja, for helping me with this!

Remembering that I am basically ignorant of Polish language, would you please explain

za ciebie/ za twoje zdrowie = (up) to you/ to your health

in detail? Or I can guess: we start with Na zdrowie: To your health. Then we morph a little to, Za twoje zdrowie: For your health. Then we migrate slightly to, Za ciebie: For you. The we translate, roughly to "(Up) to you." Is that the path you're suggesting? And my suspicion of transliteration was completely wrong!

It's hard to explain how much gratitude I feel for your help. My father-in-law was a much beloved man, so much so that he actually has his own mythology. His daughters will be delighted to understand one more piece of the wonderful patchwork that was their father.

Paul in Wisconsin
Lyzko 24 | 6,759
14 Mar 2015 #14
Sometimes I've even heard (and occasionally used) "Sto lat!", lit. "A hundred years!", i.e. "Congrats!", "Bless you!" and the like:-) Might also be used sarcastically.
Rand
14 Mar 2015 #15
Zdrowie wasze w gardło nasze.
Unja - | 8
15 Mar 2015 #16
What more to say. It is a toast and usually "to your health", "to my health" , or in short " to you" (meaning "to your health").

A toast would look like: "up" ( glasses up) "to you".
Many different toast can be exchange but usually, to people's health.
They can choose many different words, it is up to them. No ritual here .
Lyzko 24 | 6,759
15 Mar 2015 #17
"Zdrowie wasze w gardło nasze!"

Sounds almost like "Down the hatch!" Incidentally, we here in the States also say on occasion "Here's mud in your eye!"


Home / Language / Does this phrase mean anything to you in Polish? "Up to you" while drinking.
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.