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Nazwy mieszkanców - the names of a city/country residents in Polish


Leonis 30 | 61
1 Jun 2010 #1
Hello!
I would like to ask for some help again!
I know that also in Polish we can express that someone comes from/lives in somewhere with affixes.
I know that:
toruńczyk -who lives in Toruń
europejczyk - in Europe
amerikanin - in America
litwin - in Lithuania
słoweniec - who is Slovene
etc
(hope I spelled them correctly)
but... is there any rule about the using of the different affixes after the different names?
For example, how do we say in Polish:
who lives in Kraków, in £ódź, in Białystok....?
And one more question, what about the -ski ending? Do we use it only for the noble names, or can we use it in usual situations (np. warszawski... ?)? And what about the -ak ending, when do we use it?

I know it was a lot of questions, but I would be thankful for any help :-))
Ziemowit 13 | 4,038
1 Jun 2010 #2
but... is there any rule about the using of the different affixes after the different names?
For example, how do we say in Polish:
who lives in Kraków, in £ódź, in Białystok....?

This is a rather difficult question. As far as I know there isn't any rules, we just say what is phonetically convenient. For many names there may be two versions like, for example, for the inhabitant of Warsaw: you may call him 'warszawiak', and it is common as in the saying 'nie masz cwaniaka nad warszawiaka'; you may also hear the form 'warszawianin/ warszawianka' which is perhaps a little more formal.

For the names you asked:
Kraków - krakowianin, krakowiak / krakowianka
£ódź - łodzianin / łodzianka [we would not say 'łodziak']
Białystok - białostoczanin / białostoczanka

Most commonly, you use the -anin ending (gdańszczanin, szczecinianin, gdynianin), sometimes you use -iak more often than -anin (poznaniak vs. poznanianin).
RubasznyRumcajs 5 | 485
1 Jun 2010 #3
amerikanin - in America

1. Amerykanin, not amerikanin
2. Litwin, Ukrainczyk etc should be written with first letter capitalised

for example:

Poznań- Poznańska Pyra

;)
OP Leonis 30 | 61
1 Jun 2010 #4
Thank you very much for the answers!
:-)) Now it's getting clearer. And thank you for the correction, too.
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595
1 Jun 2010 #5
And one more question, what about the -ski ending? Do we use it only for the noble names, or can we use it in usual situations (np. warszawski... ?)? And what about the -ak ending, when do we use it?

ski-words are common adjectives (declined as other adjectives in all genders and cases).

Nominative case:
-ski (masc.)
-ska (fem.)
-skie (neutr. and plural)

Uniwersytet Warszawski (masc)
Ulica Warszawska (fem.)
Augustowskie noce (plural) [an old famous song]

I guess you know adjective endings in the other cases.
E.g. Mieszkam na ulicy Warszawskiej (locative case of feminine gender)
nincompoop_not 2 | 192
1 Jun 2010 #6
toruńczyk -who lives in Toruń

wrong
It's Torunianin (single) and Torunianie (plural)

As Ziemowit says, forms with '-ak' ending are less formal, but don't apply to all cities. So you don't say 'torunczyk' or 'gdanszczak'; you say 'gdanszczanin/torunianin etc and general rule is creating the names by adding '(n)in'.

Krakowiak, Warszawiak, even Wroclawiak are ok tho.
The naming rule can be split in 3 basic sections:
-naming citizens of Polish cities
-naming foreigners (such as Amerykanin, Brytyjczyk, Norweg, Szwed etc)
-naming citizens of foreign cities( berlinczyk, londynczyk, BUT prazanka= female citizen of Prague (m. - prazanin), and paryzanin = citizen of Paris (f. - paryzanka)

But as you can see - there seem to be no strict rule for foreign cities' citizens :)

I recommend this:
so.pwn.pl
Nomsense - | 38
8 Jun 2010 #7
Kraków - krakowianin, krakowiak / krakowianka

Krakowiak: a man from one of the villages in the vicinity of Kraków
encyklopedia.pwn.pl/haslo.php?id=3926971
pgtx 29 | 3,159
8 Jun 2010 #8
Krakowiak: a man from one of the villages in the vicinity of Kraków

a person who lives in the city of Krakow - krakowianin
a person who lives in the vicinity of Krakow - krakowiak

pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krakowiak
plk123 8 | 4,150
8 Jun 2010 #9
Krakowiak: a man from one of the villages in the vicinity of Kraków

a person who lives in the vicinity of Krakow - krakowiak

but that also includes folk in the town of Krakow..

Krakowiacy, mieszkańcy wsi w okolicach Krakowa, w ujęciu hist. -mieszkańcy ziemi krakowskiej.

Ziemowit 13 | 4,038
9 Jun 2010 #11
They who live in Koło, I would call them:
'zakręceni Kolanie' or 'skołowani Kolanie'.

When they're having a partiularly good time, they may be called 'rozkręceni Kolanie'. But locals from neighbouring towns and villiges would perhaps call them 'Kolaki' ('Kolak' in singular).
Nomsense - | 38
11 Jun 2010 #12
a person who lives in the city of Krakow - krakowianin
a person who lives in the vicinity of Krakow - krakowiak

Actually, I would use the term Krakowiak only in regards to a village man in the traditional costume.

but that also includes folk in the town of Krakow..

Krakowiacy, mieszkańcy wsi w okolicach Krakowa, w ujęciu hist. - mieszkańcy ziemi krakowskiej.


Well, yes, but that must be a really old meaning, probably from the XV or XIV century (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ziemia).
WhizzKid - | 9
11 Jun 2010 #13
Actually, I would use the term Krakowiak only in regards to a village man in the traditional costume.

Actuall, USJP, a dictionary based on language corpus, says that the primary meaning of "Krakowiak" still remains "an inhabitant of the area surrounding Kraków".

who live in Koło ?

Mieszkaniec Koła :-)
Nomsense - | 38
12 Jun 2010 #14
Mieszkaniec Koła :-)

kolanin, kolanka:
sjp.pl/co/kolanin
sjp.pl/co/kolanka


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