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Message from Polish speaking friend (in English) translation help


easynow 1 | 1
12 Nov 2015 #1
Hi

quite a personal message from my (ex) mother in law regarding my (ex) girlfriend. Both of which are Polish. Not sure how to read it as her mum's english is not great. We are still friends on FB and I always had a good relationship with her mum.. she's a sweet woman.

my question to her was something like...

" Hi ****, how are you? sorry to bother you.. etc etc... i've been talking with Magda (my ex) again recently via email and I'm trying to win her back, because I still care for her greatly. I noticed on your FB page that she may be engaged to someone now?.. If she is in a relationship with a new guy and is happy, i will stop contacting/talking to her - because it wouldn't be fair of me to interfere.. and i just want her to be happy. i would appreciate it if you don't tell her I contacted you, because it might cause unnecessary drama. Best **** "

If any polish speakers can make sense of her reply below.. i.e: english written in Polish form.

Her reply was:

"Hello ****
Magda meets a few months with someone, I think that is her right, although they differ in life, but it is not engaged, I think, that you can talk to her and it will be best for you. It was a nice time when you visited us and know you. best regards. i will not say her conversation. sorry for my language."

The parts, I've highlighted confuse me the most? does it literally mean "she has a right to do that" and "although they differ in life" mean - they disagree a lot? or they are very different as people?

I would greatly appreciate it ... if it's possible ;)

dzieki
Looker - | 1,107
12 Nov 2015 #2
"she has a right to do that"

That's what she meant probably.

"although they differ in life"

I think it's close what was on her mind. Something like: they differ from one another.
(Just guessing here)
jon357 69 | 18,445
12 Nov 2015 #3
"she has a right to do that"

Possibly, but it could also mean that the writer thinks she is doing the right thing. When Polish people say "you have right", they mean "you are right". The words 'a right' and 'right' (as in you are right) are very different in Polish. The person who replied to you may have meant one or the other. The level of English in the message as a whole suggests they are not precise about using the word 'a'.

although they differ in life

Yes, Looker is right. It means they are very different people, perhaps socially, economically, educationally, in outlook on life or in nationality.
OP easynow 1 | 1
12 Nov 2015 #4
Possibly, but it could also mean that the writer thinks she is doing the right thing.

That's what i feared :(

Thank you
jon357 69 | 18,445
12 Nov 2015 #5
That's what i feared :(

Don't fear it too much, I misread the message and maybe Looker's version is closer. In Polish 'is right' (ma racje) and 'has a right' (ma prawo) are different but looking back I see that the writer said

I think that is her right

and she really could mean either.
Don't be too pessimistic - I can imagine a Polish lady saying it in Polish, and the second certainly rings true.
Looker - | 1,107
12 Nov 2015 #6
The poll:

What is a chance that this phrase in Ponglish:

I think that is her right

means this in English?:

she is doing the right thing

My vote, as a Pole who learns English, is: no more than 50% (probably less)

Although a good remark from Jon.
jon357 69 | 18,445
12 Nov 2015 #7
I'm 50-50 on this Looker but now tending to your translation. I was looking at his words rather than the quote so had misread the original post. Looking at the bit that says 'her' right, could make all the difference.

It would be obvious if the lady was actually speaking, but an email or whatever is less clear. As a native speaker of English (who speaks only Polish at home) I'm thinking back to the times in the past when I used to speak English with Poles. So many times, I've heard people say 'you have right' or even 'you have a right' when they mean 'you are right. But this lady - well, 'her' could make all the difference. But might not...
Chemikiem
12 Nov 2015 #8
means this in English

Personally, I would not say that those two phrases mean the same thing.

So many times, I've heard people say 'you have right' or even 'you have a right' when they mean 'you are right.

So have I, being in regular contact with Poles who are learning English. But if that was what was meant in the reply, then you would think that she would have said, " I think that she has right " instead of " I think that is her right ", although in the context of the sentence, that reply doesn't make any sense to me. What would she be right about?

I think it's more likely that she meant she has a right to do this, as in seeing someone else, but who knows? We're all just guessing here!
cms 9 | 1,255
13 Nov 2015 #9
I would say that she means "and that's up to her" i.e. its her daughter's right to see who she wants even if her mother thinks they are different people.

good luck ! I'm glad you get on with your mother in law - not easy with Polish family :)
cinek 2 | 345
13 Nov 2015 #10
I think that is her right, although they differ in life,

I would say that she means "and that's up to her" i.e. its her daughter's right to see who she wants even if her mother thinks they are different people.

Certainly. It meant that every one has a right to choose the person to be with. And, if her mother is telling that to you, I'd say that she thinks that her daughter would be better off being with you instead.

Cinek
istannbullu34 1 | 105
28 Dec 2015 #11
I am trying to find out two car part names in Polish, if anybody can help

motor/engine mount and transmission mount, these are the parts to keep the car part from falling apart.
Atrom - | 6
28 Dec 2015 #12
I am not a car mechanic. So only what I could find in a dictionary

engine/transmission mount = poduszka silnika/skrzyni biegów
istannbullu34 1 | 105
30 Dec 2015 #13
Thank you, poduszka silnika is what I was looking for.


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