The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Language  % width posts: 59

Is math in Polish different than in English?


Wroclaw 44 | 5,384
21 Sep 2010 #31
The divisions symbols used by Poles are exactly the same, so yes mathematics is a universal language.

maybe u can't see it, but the diagram shows two different versions of the division sign. the difference may be slight, but to someone who was never taught it it is big.
takapulta - | 1
7 May 2013 #32
Math is not a language. Numbers are the same in any country. Number seven has a small crossing line. Polish use comma instead of point to mark the decimal units position. Other symbols are the same.

It doesn't mean that math is universal. For example in articleMathematics as (Multi)cultural Practice: Irish Lessons From the Polish Weekend School

the authors challenge the erroneous assumption that mathematics is universal, and thus culturally neutral, by critically investigating diverse cultural meanings and "ways of knowing" that influence individual/social (affective) forms of identity. The authors begin by briefly detailing the structural features of a Polish weekend school and providing an overview profile of the Polish community living in Ireland. The rationale for the "weekend" school is then discussed from both Polish and Irish perspectives.

Not only symbolic system differ, but also the ways of "working out" problems.

Interesting quotes:

The weekend school appeared to demand greater investigative problem solving. Students were encouraged to use critical thinking and were not easily coached or supported in finding "easy" routes to the solution. Polish mathematics, it appeared, did not stress rule-based or formula approaches as much as (our knowledge of) Irish classroom practice. For example, the Polish mathematics teacher noted the reliance of students on the BIMDAS rule (Brackets before Indices, Multiplication, Division, Addition and Subtraction) learned in Irish school as limiting a more "natural" approach to solving problems. Moreover, students appeared over-eager to apply formulae to speed, distance, and time problems, instead of "working out the meaning behind them."
Alongside more abstract expectations, Polish students were required to manually "work out" arithmetic problems, as calculators were disallowed for both school and home work use. Additionally, the full range of Real numbers was normalised, as (what might be commonly termed as) irregular solutions frequently appeared, for example 7/125 or 1.33, and so on. Similarly, it was not unusual for Polish students to regularly negotiate square roots and powers and engage with substantially small and big numbers.

Polish students indicated to us that Irish text problems were "much easier" and that they regularly received top marks in exams. Their confidence in Irish mathematics was generally high and they associated this with their exam success, less arduous homework and, as one student put it, the fact that "you don't have to think in Irish maths." (...)
Students indicated to us that homework demands were more challenging in Polish school, as it took longer to do and demanded a greater degree of "working out." (...) Some had noted their feelings of frustration in Polish school at, as one student put it, "having to think and explain my answers."

That's interesting. If we're so good at math, then why we don't have more famous mathematicians and why many of my school doesn't know the most basic formulas? Maybe Polish school in Ireland is better than here.
xpertsajid - | 1
8 May 2013 #33
It's same
specially in this case :))
Rysavy 10 | 308
8 May 2013 #34
Polish Math

American Math

Hmm... maybe there is some difference
berni23 7 | 379
8 May 2013 #35
Sorry, i havent read the the thread, but lol.
whyikit 6 | 102
8 May 2013 #36
As noted above there are difference the biggest one is the decimal point and what that should look like. This can be different on a country by country basis. I would also expect the way it is taught is different for instance, when I was at school in the 1980/90s we were taught how to divide and multiply a certain way. Recently I saw how this is now been taught in UK schools and it is completely different, for instance for dividing they use something called "chunking".... Really confused me for a bit....

On a slightly different subject, and I am ashamed that I thought this previously, I thought there was only 1 version of Excel. What shock I got when looking at Polish excel and I didn't understand any formulae..... Does anyone know if VBA is the same?
berni23 7 | 379
8 May 2013 #37
In science there is 0 difference in math, how could anybody even suggest there should be?
One could argue that a Polish mathematician has a different theory than an English one, but that are just theories.

When we are talking about preschool "math" or Microsoft products thats a different matter and has nothing to do with math as a science.
whyikit 6 | 102
8 May 2013 #38
In science there is 0 difference in math, how could anybody even suggest there should be?

So all countries use the same symbol for a decimal point, the same symbol for dividing?

For a decimal point UK use . whilst in Germany they use , I know this is used in Business in the different countries
In the Uk for dividing we would use / or the ÷ symbol, but people here are saying in Poland you would use :
berni23 7 | 379
8 May 2013 #39
So all countries use the same symbol for a decimal point, the same symbol for dividing?

In scientific community yes.
whyikit 6 | 102
8 May 2013 #40
However out in the real world they don't.....
sobieski 107 | 2,128
8 May 2013 #41
Maths is in every culture a nightmare.
bullfrog 6 | 602
9 May 2013 #42
Difficult to generalize, but I would say that in general, the academic level in schools in the US and UK is lower compared to the Continent (not only Poland, but also Germany, France..). In the UK and US, the focus is more on building social skills (building a personality, being popular with other kids..) whereas on the continent it is more academic performance. Or at least that was the case 20 years ago. Both systems are converging now..
pam
9 May 2013 #43
In the UK and US, the focus is more on building social skills (building a personality, being popular with other kids..)

You what? Can't speak for the US, but I'm British and the focus you're talking about doesn't ring any bells at all. What d'you think our schools are? Holiday camps or sth? Bullfrog, you're talking bull..........
bullfrog 6 | 602
9 May 2013 #44
dear Pam

I'm afraid you are the one talking bull. I have personally experienced both the British and French systems, and my kids have been in the British and Polish systems, and what I say is certainly my experience of UK vs French/Polish. What is your experience of other systems than the British one?
poland_
9 May 2013 #45
Bullfrog, TBS warsaw is not a true reflection of UK system. TBS is mostly a international language school, the academic level in TBS is good fro international level, although not a touch on British private schooling.
bullfrog 6 | 602
9 May 2013 #46
TBS warsaw

I'm not talking about that, I am talking about British schools in the Uk (we lived in London during 9 years)
pam
9 May 2013 #47
What is your experience of other systems than the British one?

I don't have experience of continental school systems,so I can't comment on whether they're better or not, but that isn't what I was talking about.

I was referring to the statement you made regarding US/UK schools. Whilst I'd be the first to admit there are plenty of faults within the British education system, your statement about UK schools is implying there is little academic bias, and I'm afraid that's just wrong!

Yes, there are good schools and not so good schools in the UK, as I'm sure there are in Poland/France. Picking the right school is obviously important, and unfortunately the standard of teaching varies considerably, as I'm sure it does in European schools also.
Harry
9 May 2013 #48
the academic level in schools in the US and UK is lower compared to the Continent (not only Poland, but also Germany, France..).

I've taught in both the UK and Poland and entirely disagree with you. If anything, in Poland the focus is on memorising things with little regard given to actually understanding them.
bullfrog 6 | 602
9 May 2013 #49
Not in scientific subjects, eg in physics or maths. I found the UK teaching to be more 'recipe learning ' driven, less based on understanding the issues.

I don't have experience of continental school systems,so I can't comment on whether they're better or not, but that isn't what I was talking about.

I'm not saying that one is better than the other, I am saying that the UK system is more focused on building a personnality/social skills and less on pure academia. If anything, I prefer the first system (and my children are now in the UK system), but I stick by to the fact that the academic level, especially in maths, is lower in the UK.
pam
9 May 2013 #50
[quote=bullfrog] I prefer the first system (and my children are now in the UK system), but I stick by to the fact that the academic level, especially in maths, is lower in the UK.

Your kids were in TBS, Warsaw? This is a private, fee paying school, where I imagine the standards are higher than your average local Polish school for starters. If that's the case, then you're not comparing like for like are you?
bullfrog 6 | 602
9 May 2013 #51
Your kids were in TBS, Warsaw?

Please read before posting Pam
poland_
9 May 2013 #52
If anything, in Poland the focus is on memorising things with little regard given to actually understanding them.

+1

or being able to use the information memorised. It is mentioned by many Poles experiencing the British and Polish education system. The Polish system beats you down, the British system builds you up.
bullfrog 6 | 602
9 May 2013 #53
Maybe, but the bottom line is that Polish students are doing better than British students at maths (since that's what the thread is about)..

guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/dec/07/world-education-rankings-maths-science-reading#data
poland_
9 May 2013 #54
The Irish are also doing better then the UK according to the article.British are taught to be creative, industrious, free thinkers if you want to know what 2+2 = get an account especially an Indian one.
gag girl
5 May 2015 #55
really idk about all these different systems of math an language it all just seems like too much trouble and hardship
majkel - | 64
6 May 2015 #56
My experience of British education system is that when you ask an office worker to do a simple math problem (excel calculations) even inteligent British person usually says - "I can't do that, I'm not a mathematician!".

Go figure.

In Poland mathematics is important part of the studies, it is not being pushed aside (at least it didn't used to!).

I agree with memorising tons of material and not necessarily teaching you to think thing (again, at least that's how it used to be).
Roger5 1 | 1,455
6 May 2015 #57
majkel. Last month I went to pay our accountant for my business and my wife's business. There was 145 PLN to pay for each. The woman in the office turned on her calculator and entered 2 x 145 = 290. Then she cancelled and did it again: 2 x 145 = 290. I can assure you that younger Poles are not as great at arithmetic as you suggest.
majkel - | 64
6 May 2015 #58
Roger, young accoutant?
You sure you didn't go to US? (Urząd skarbowy :))
Lyzko 33 | 7,990
12 May 2015 #59
I find this most enlightening. All I knew before checking out this thread was that in certain countries, counting begins with the thumb extended slightly, rather than than with the index finger. For instance, if I went to a pub in Germany and asked for one beer, but my thumb were still visible (as opposed to tucked neatly beneath the fist of my hand), I might instead be served two:-)


Home / Language / Is math in Polish different than in English?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.