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What do you like in Polish language?


OP zetigrek    
24 Aug 2010  #31
Never heard anybody saying idę na pole... what's that? gwara śląska?
tow_stalin - | 57    
24 Aug 2010  #32
for sure it isn't a gwara śląska :) idę na dwór it is. idę na pole is rather gwara małopolska, i heard a lot of krakusy telling this.
z_darius 14 | 3,971    
24 Aug 2010  #33
Never heard anybody saying idę na pole... what's that? gwara śląska?

It doesn't mean much what you have heard.
It is the original Polish expression from Malopolska.

The phrase is definitely clean Polish, and more so than "na dwor", according to prof. Miodek. "Na dwor" is not. It came into Polish from the Russian language and it took roots during the partitions and spread throughout from Mazowsze.
pgtx 29 | 3,161    
24 Aug 2010  #34
Never heard anybody saying idę na pole... what's that? gwara śląska?

what?! hehehe...my w Krakowie tak se gadamy... :)
OP zetigrek    
  24 Aug 2010  #35
iść na pole zamiast na dwór??? Poważnie?!

for sure it isn't a gwara śląska :) idę na dwór it is

I'm from Lodz and in Lodz and we say iść na dwór.
pgtx 29 | 3,161    
24 Aug 2010  #36
iść na pole zamiast na dwór??? Poważnie?!

no tak, powaznie! hehehe... nie slyszalas nigdy? :)
OP zetigrek    
  24 Aug 2010  #37
nie, ale już sprawdziłam i jest to wyrażenie charakterystyczne dla niektórych regionów, ale przede wszystkim słynie z niego właśnie Kraków. W £odzi i Wawie mowi się na dwór.

Btw. i've just checked łódzka gwara and I'm curious do you know such popular words in łódź like:

- migawka
- krańcówka
- ekspres (nie do kawy)
- angielka (nie Angielka)
- trambambula
- ja pierdykam

also do you use word kartofel (which is not part of £ódzka Gwara)
pgtx 29 | 3,161    
24 Aug 2010  #38
- ja pierdykam

cos w stylu "ja piernicze"?

also do you use word kartofel (which is not part of £ódzka Gwara

Inne nazwy stosowane w Polsce

* barabola – gwara kresowa – Lwów
* kompera – język łemkowski
* kartofel (z niem. Kartoffel) – zwłaszcza dialekt śląski, ale także w całym kraju
* pyra – gwara poznańska
* grula – gwara góralska (wschodnie Podhale)
* bulwa – język kaszubski
* perka (dawniej) od Peru
* rzepa – Orawa, zachodnie Podhale
* swapka – Orawa

from Wiki
OP zetigrek    
  24 Aug 2010  #39
cos w stylu "ja piernicze"?

tak tak.

I know what kartofel means because in my family we use this word pretty often. I'm just curious that other part of poland also use it.

* kartofel (z niem. Kartoffel) – zwłaszcza dialekt śląski, ale także w całym kraju

ok. thx for answer :)

And other words? Migawka, krańcówka? it's hard to believe that rest of Poland don't know these words...
Paulina 8 | 1,437    
24 Aug 2010  #40
iść na pole zamiast na dwór??? Poważnie?!

I think a teacher told us about this at Polish classes in high school ;)
We say "na dwór" in Kielce :)

There's only one "migawka" I know: pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Migawka
Ekspres - pociąg ekspresowy? o_O
Ja pierdykam - we say "ja pierniczę" :)
I don't know the meaning of the rest of these words ;)

also do you use word kartofel (which is not part of £ódzka Gwara)

I'd say "ziemniak" is more common in Kielce.

Btw, have you ever heard word "sztyngiel"?

Ten tramwaj jedzie na krańcówkę, masz ważną migawkę?

;D
I would look like this: O_O
But we don't have trams in Kielce... ;)
NorthMancPolak 4 | 649    
24 Aug 2010  #41
for sure it isn't a gwara śląska :) idę na dwór it is. idę na pole is rather gwara małopolska

zzzz. We've had this argument so many times before. I'm waiting for Seanus to come along and join us ;) (he's always welcome though! :D )

Do you not think it's possible for several regions in a country to use similar dialect words or phrases? People say "manky" round here, but that's also a Birmingham word :)

While I accept that those who say that it's used in Małopolska must be correct (I don't know from experience, and I don't know a single person from Kraków/Małopolska), but have known lots of people from Silesia (górny i dolny) - indeed, much of my family comes from there - and these are the only people I have ever heard using phrases like this.

I even remember a conversation which I was once involved in, between a couple who came from near Katowice, and my girlfriend at the time (who comes from Bydgoszcz). They were explaining to her what a lot of Silesian dialect/language words meant in standard Polish - and idę na pole was one of them. I learnt a lot that day.

However, my stepfather grew up around Bytom, and he used standard Polish and no Ślůnsko godka whatsoever.
Seanus 15 | 19,717    
24 Aug 2010  #42
Co Ty godosz? Ile mosz lot? I play footie with a guy from Ruda Śląska and he seems to be understood only by himself. I bet he even foxes himself on occasion :) Grumy grumy :)
NorthMancPolak 4 | 649    
24 Aug 2010  #43
Well, I once tried talking to my mum in my best south London (this was quite some time ago, obviously ;) ) and she said "that's a completely different language to me" lol :D
Seanus 15 | 19,717    
24 Aug 2010  #44
Yeah, a bit like when I speak Polish or Japanese to my parents. They get lost when I start, really. Polish has that great potential for disastrous embarrassment with cases. I have largely avoided that but I'm not gonna get complacent in my old age :)
NorthMancPolak 4 | 649    
24 Aug 2010  #45
lol. It was even worse whan I spoke Czech to her, she thought toaletni ubrousky were toilet tablecloths lol, she thinks because she knows Russian that she can understand every Slavic language, but I've managed to convince her that this isn't really true :) but she still wonders where I get all these "Russian" words from lol :D
Seanus 15 | 19,717    
24 Aug 2010  #46
Oh, there are plenty false friends and I'm sure we know most of them :)
md06jnk - | 3    
26 Aug 2010  #48
i like

teskine ze toba in polish. language..and kocham and many more..its easy to learn
Polak89 1 | 13    
26 Aug 2010  #49
Interesting...my girlfriend is from Dvor located in Croatia... meaning the same thing and also they say Polje for our Pole.
stank702    
5 Apr 2011  #50
Jestem rodzony w Polsce. Ojciec bul rolnikiem, wojewudstwo Krakowskie. Now I live in the USA. I am not a language expert by any stretch, I just like to make an observation. When I was growing up(in Poland) I always used 'na pole' but 'na dwor' seemed to be preferred by the older generation such as my grandparents. I've noticed that whether you're in Poland or the US there is a generational gap not only in ideas but also in speech, that might have been what I experienced growing up.
Polmag    
6 Feb 2019  #51
Język polski jest najłatwiejszym językiem na świecie! (I'm a native English speaker btw.....)
Rich Mazur 5 | 2,507    
6 Feb 2019  #52
Kocham język polski.

I disliked Polish language so much that I left the country. There is something in it that makes comprehension from a distance difficult. Not so with English.

Listening to that Polish rolling r is torture. And, then, kurwa this and kurwa that, or, alternately, kurwa mac. Do Poles hate women? At least, "f***ing" as an adjective is fairly neutral and not an expression of hate toward any specific person. Even "f***" is OK. "F*** you" is very personal and should be avoided unless addressed to a global warming moron or Pelosi.
pawian 144 | 7,546    
  10 Feb 2019  #53
I disliked Polish language so much that I left the country.

I hope you understand it is ridiculously implausible. Do you expect people to believe that you don`t know the Polish language because you once disliked it so much that you even left the country? You`d better change your profile story to sound more credulous. Who told you that Poles are so dumb? Your only hope now is that some foreigners might buy it and really think you are connected with Polishness.
Rich Mazur 5 | 2,507    
  10 Feb 2019  #54
Do you expect people to believe that you don`t know the Polish language because you once disliked it

No, I don't because I never said that I don't know the Polish language.
I just don't like it. Just as I don't like Polish food. I didn't like short summers and nasty winters. I didn't like waiting for the bus. I didn't like my cold bedroom with 6 ribs.

What is it about you and others here with that nonsense that just because a guy was born in Poland he somehow is obligated to like almost everything there.

That "I disliked Polish language so much that I left the country" was just to get your attention. The fact is that I listened to the VoA religiously and promised myself that one day I will speaking the American English rather than the British, which, by the way, I dislike almost as much as Polish. It's a shame that schools in Poland teach the British English.

Your only hope now is that some foreigners might buy it and really think you are connected with Polishness.

Would you want me to post my Polish passport or would you prefer my birth certificate?
Lyzko 20 | 5,967    
10 Feb 2019  #55
One can dislike a regime, but not a language!

I love the Polish language, although I'm not Polish either by birth or descent.
Rich Mazur 5 | 2,507    
12 Feb 2019  #56
One can dislike a regime, but not a language!

There are only three languages that deserve to be liked for the way they sound: American English, French, and Italian. The rest is somewhere between tolerable and painful.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,254    
  12 Feb 2019  #57
American English sounds rather painful to me, but British English sounds nice. This is probably because I started learning English in its British version, so when I heard American English for the first time, it did sound utterly strange to me.

I cannot comment on Polish (my mother tongue) because I am too much immersed in it. Thus it sounds completely neutral for me.

Czech sounds nice and - as for everyone whose mother tongue is Polish - often sounds funny. I like German with the exeption of German spoken in films where I find it strange and sort of unrealistic. Russian is undoubtedly a language which is an extremely 'musical' one.
Rich Mazur 5 | 2,507    
12 Feb 2019  #58
American English sounds rather painful to me, but British English sounds nice.

AE is simpler. Take "I know". The BE version makes that "ow" sound as if there were three vowels in it. Way too complicated and too long. In the AE edition, "know" sounds like "no" - short and easy to say.

Also, AE is more natural for the humans to sing in, even for the Brits. A British singer or a group may try to sing in the BE but they will sound more like they were Americans. At least, this is my impression.
Miloslaw 6 | 1,395    
  12 Feb 2019  #59
Most British singers sing with an American accent,though there are plenty of exceptions.
Not sure when this began but I'm guessing it was after the war when American Big Band Jazz and Rock'n'Roll took off over here.

Neither would sound right in a BE accent. :-)

Please focus on the Polish language only
Lyzko 20 | 5,967    
12 Feb 2019  #60
I hope you're not including German in your dismissal of "other" languages, Rich.


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