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Polish insult that sounds kinda like " e sha vees ta" ?


mikkimae78 1 | 1
9 Oct 2011 #1
My grandma used to say an insult in polish to my jaja. I don't know how to spell it. In english it sounds kinda like " e sha vees ta" My sister said it roughly translates to go take a shit for yourself, but we are not sure if grandma was telling the truth!
WielkiPolak 58 | 1,024
9 Oct 2011 #2
It does not sound like anything that I can think of. It might be 'idz [ić?] sie wysraj,' that would mean go do a poo, but that does not sound like something many people say to each other, even to be rude, it just makes no sense to me whatsoever. Unless of course she said it to him when he was moaning that his stomach hurts or wants to go to the bathroom.
pawian 178 | 16,110
9 Oct 2011 #3
Yes, I know it, but I can`t tell, it is too vulgar.
Sorry.

But Wielki Polak said it already and it is correct.
hythorn 3 | 580
9 Oct 2011 #4
it sounds more like she was saying 'of course'
TheJamesDamon
9 Oct 2011 #5
My grandma used to say an insult in polish to my jaja

Jaja means testicle in Polish slang.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
9 Oct 2011 #6
My grandma used to say an insult in polish to my jaja.

She used to insult your testicles? Well... that's original.
pawian 178 | 16,110
9 Oct 2011 #7
Polish grandmas can be very nasty sometimes.
a.k.
9 Oct 2011 #8
" e sha vees ta"

I think it's simple szowinista (a chauvinist). Especially męski szowinista (male chauvinist) might fit the context ;)
pawian 178 | 16,110
9 Oct 2011 #9
His granma said it when he displayed his testicles?
a.k.
9 Oct 2011 #10
pawian

Maybe she wanted to say ekshibicjonista but forgot the word. That would explain this "e" at the begining :D
OP mikkimae78 1 | 1
10 Oct 2011 #11
so, i double checked with my mom and she said phonetically it was like e sha veestray. i think that is more like it. yes, it was vulgar- go take a shit? definately. but an insult nonetheless, no? i am saying/spelling it best i can the way it sounded in english (does that make sense?)

also, as far as ja ja being slang for testicles, maybe i have spelling wrong but that is what we called him. he and grandma both came as first generation polish to america, spoke fluent polish as well as read and wrote it. they refused to teach their kids because that way they could communicate without being "heard". im sure my grandfather would never allow us grandkids to say a bad word! he took it as a term of endearment, so obviously there is something lost in translation!
a.k.
10 Oct 2011 #12
ja ja

jaja means eggs in Polish and is pronounced yaya. In the same way as you refer balls to some male's intimate organs, in Poland we call them eggs.

Grandfather is dziadek and is pronounce like jadek

e sha veestray

WielkiPolak is right about translation but contrary to what he wrote, it makes a sense. It's quite childlish and yokel to say it. A person say it when he/she wants to manifest his/her disregard to things what someone just said or in a quarrel when someone called you a bad name you can say that in revenge. It's like saying you talk cr*p but it's beyond any level of a class. Even educated people curse sometimes but this kind of phares shows that the person who uses it is a simpleton (or a kid) and that would cause a real embarrasment around. I'm sorry to tell you that.
isthatu2 4 | 2,703
10 Oct 2011 #13
Sounds like they spoke fluent Russian when they arrived TBH.

/\ cont' or maybe a touch of Ukrainian (?) ,were they from the east of Poland?
I love hearing all these old hidden dialects that seem to have largely disapeared in todays Poland :)
Zazulka 3 | 129
10 Oct 2011 #14
Idź się wysraj i 100% Polish and dosn't come from some dialect.
This is not a nice reply to someone who according to us speaks crap. And it is still quite common in Polish language.

Mijimaes:
jaja pronounced yaya are eggs in Polish or testicles
dziadzia pronounced jaja is grandpa in Polish
gumishu 11 | 5,740
10 Oct 2011 #15
isthatu2

I love hearing all these old hidden dialects that seem to have largely disapeared in todays Poland :)

have you heard the Kurpian dialect (or generally northern Masovian dialects) - I guess you will love it - my grandparents from the side of my mum spoke that - they have a sound similar to 'th' in that - and other not quite typically Polish sounds
a.k.
10 Oct 2011 #16
dziadzia pronounced jaja is grandpa in Polish

Only very little kids (toddlers who learn to speak) would say it. It's like saying gaga, baba. The proper word for grandfather is dziadek.


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