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What "YOU" is the correct one? Polish language question.


pawian 163 | 10,300
8 May 2019 #31
I wonder if enough native speakers of Polish have confirmed

When one person says you are drunk, you can laugh at it. When the second says so, think about it. When the third does so, you should go home and to bed right away. :):)
Lyzko 25 | 7,384
8 May 2019 #32
According to that logic, if one native speaker confirmed to me what I posted, then that person must either be drunk, crazy, or was merely trying to humor me!

For what reason is anyone's guess:-)
Przelotnyptak1 - | 538
8 May 2019 #33
that my example drawn was rare indeed!

Why don't you admit, it is easy, just say it I " was wrong" .Why do you think almost every response, counters your opinion?
Not to know is not a crime, stop protesting and you will discover ,people are much more tolerant ,understanding
Lyzko 25 | 7,384
8 May 2019 #34
If a Pole tells me that I might be right, such is worth more than all the nay-sayers out there merely trying to give me a hard time.

How about YOU admitting that maybe, just maybe, YOU might be wrong, huh?

We're not talking fact question here, where if I were to say, "Radom is the capital of Poland!", but a helpful native told me. "Hey, Marku, you're WRONG, dude! It's

WARSAW!!".

Experience is always subject to interpretation and if one was there at one particular time, what actually occurred, could be easily confirmed.
pawian 163 | 10,300
8 May 2019 #35
then that person must either be drunk, crazy, or was merely trying to humor me!

Also , yanking your chain.

E.g. if a non-Pole asked you to tell him how to say goodbye to a hospitable Polish family e..g, I had a great time, you were such wonderful hosts, you could say: Pocałujta mnie w dupę. and teach him how to pronounce it.
kaprys 2 | 2,111
8 May 2019 #36
Which Pole told you you might be right, Lyzko?
All I can see here is a bunch of native speakers (and a Scot living here for years) who keep telling you are wrong.
And I'm sorry but you are wrong.
Lyzko 25 | 7,384
8 May 2019 #37
...hence embarrassing the bloody pants of the person.

Uh-uh, paw! I know the score by now, I've been to Hungary and ain't gonna be "duped" twice, no pun intended! I was almost tricked by some local chaps into wishing the assembled group "Cheers!" vs. "Kiss my butt!" in Hungarian (the two phrases sound nearly identical to foreigners!!), but I outsmarted 'em

all and said nothingLOL

@kaprys,
Glad you asked:-) A female (non-Forum) acquaintance from Poznan as it happens.
kaprys 2 | 2,111
8 May 2019 #38
@Lyzko
Oh, so that makes two 'Polish' people who confirmed you might be right. First, it was that manager from Warsaw, now a lady from Poznan.

It's always so convincing to read you 'know' Polish people who 'confirm' you're right.
I guess we need to rewrite books on the usage of Polish now.
And I seem to know so many homosexual guys. I didn't know they were gay. I wonder if they do.
Przelotnyptak1 - | 538
8 May 2019 #39
How about YOU admitting that maybe, just maybe, YOU might be wrong, huh?

O.K. Just show me where I am wrong, and you can be sure I will admit it .Do you really think people derive sick pleasure by giving hard time?

In conclusion ,Delph may interpret any word as a come on, From Delph it is understandable

Glad you asked:-) A female (non-Forum) acquaintance from Poznan as it happens.

Probably Ukrainian hardly speaking Polish,::))I know, I know Some Ukrainians use excellent Polish, some of them are Polish
Lyzko 25 | 7,384
8 May 2019 #40
Scarcely, rather a native Pole who happens to have studied linguistics at the local U.
:-)

Bottom line, przelotnyptak et al. You're being professional contrarians, that's all. Have encountered your
ilk before, Often, we simply call ya'll "wise guys", sometimes, "characters"!
kaprys 2 | 2,111
8 May 2019 #41
@Lyzko
Yeah, they don't exist.

That guy will never learn Polish.

There's this Polish saying: Uderz w stół, a nożyce się odezwa' - mind you, there's no 'Niech Pan uderzy'.
As for lying, I'm sure you know when you are.
And if you're trying to convince the mods to give a warning /ban someone who actually knows a thing or two about Poland and the Polish reality and tells the truth, it's quite telling.

There's nothing homosexual about using 'Ty' when addressing another man. :)))
'Thick skull' - can you explain this subtlety to me, please?

It's a thread about the usage of ty. As several native speakers of Polish (I believe most of them, if not all, with university degrees) have openly stated there's nothing homosexual about using it.

What about that thick skull of mine?
Miloslaw 6 | 3,177
8 May 2019 #42
It's a thread about the usage of ty.

How the hell can "Ty" have homosexual connotations?????
Lyzko 25 | 7,384
8 May 2019 #43
"Ty" connotes intimacy, yes? Fine, we're on the same page!

Stands to reason therefore, that it's entirely possible one of two male adult
strangers addressed by their first names right off the bat, be it in Poland, Germany or France,
to wonder to themselves (or out loud) why the heck this other forty-something dude is
calling the other person by their first name by getting up close and personal!

Poland is Europe, NOT the US.:-)

Let's just say, it MIGHT be construed as such, even if the encounter is entirely innocent.
Przelotnyptak1 - | 538
9 May 2019 #44
Scarcely, rather a native Pole who happens to have studied linguistics at the local U.:-)

I hope you are aware that ,you don't answer ,you dodge, you evade .
Rich Mazur 4 | 4,825
9 May 2019 #45
Polish "pan" and that fake Polish respect are not only useless. They ruin things.
I married my wife in 1970. Her father died in 1983. For 13 years, he never said this simple thing: Rich, call me Marian. Four words that would have made our interactions simpler and friendlier. My mistake was that I still had that idiotic sense of respect for an older guy only because he was older. On the other hand, there was no way I would ever call him "father". I didn't come to "America" to continue with this crap.

The result: I never addressed him in any way - although he felt free to call me Rich - and avoided all contacts with him where it would be necessary. Instead, our relationship was fake, stiff, and unfriendly. That is why when it was my turn, the day I met my first future son in law, I said: Michael, call me Rich, and never anything else. The relief on his face was immediate.
kaprys 2 | 2,111
9 May 2019 #46
Intimacy doesn't equal sexuality. 'Ty' has no homosexual connotations.

As for addressing the in-laws, Polish people hardly ever use Pan /Pani. They use another form :))))
Lyzko 25 | 7,384
9 May 2019 #47
I'm aware of that.
Nonetheless, I stand by what I've experienced in Poland as well as among Poles heretofore, accept the truth or nor:-)
Most of my dealings with Poles, both here and abroad, have been on a business basis, therefore I use "Ty" with exceeding
infrequency.

@Rich,
That happens to be your opinion to which you are entitled. Just don't promote it as gospel, ok?
:-)
Przelotnyptak1 - | 538
9 May 2019 #48
As for addressing the in-laws, Polish people hardly ever use Pan /Pani.

People mixing apples and oranges and trying to pretend that apples and oranges are the same Rules for using Pan and Ty in Poland and USA

Are vastly different, only an idiot would argue the point, or someone trying to stir the sh*it
OP Nightshadow
9 May 2019 #49
Thank you guys!
I enjoyed your debate too! :))
Lyzko 25 | 7,384
9 May 2019 #50
We as well.
To be continued:-)


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