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"bibshite" Is this is an actual polish phrase and if so what does it mean?


emma c
15 Sep 2012 #1
hello!

i've recently started my first year teaching in england and have a few polish children in my class. one of the children answers something that sounds like "bibshite" instead of "good morning"... i was just wondering if this is an actual polish phrase and if so what it means? the children are only four and another english boy has started using it! just wanted to check as it sounds quite rude in english, dont want parents complaining! :)

thanks in advance :)
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
15 Sep 2012 #2
Good morning in Polish sounds to English ears like gin dobree or jen dobree

Hi sounds like chair-shhhhhed

Hello sounds like hallo or vitam (like the BE way of saying vitamin without the in)

I have absolutely no idea what he's saying - it would appear he's been watching reruns of Father Ted!

Yes, the case of Emma seems very dubious. Another stinking troll?

It's a fun one anyway, I really did LOL when I read that "word" used, and that ain't easy the way things are here!

btw Emma - I am not a Polish native - one might be along in a moment to explain that the child isn't corrupting the word gobshite and is actually saying something touching and rather beautiful in 18th century Polski ...
OP emma c
15 Sep 2012 #3
thanks for the reply InWroclaw... I was really hoping for it to be a nice phrase!! :/ I don't want to be ignoring the child if he's genuinely trying because at the moment his english is very poor and i'd love to include phrases in the class to get the other polish children involved!! think i might just 'correct' them now then and get them to say good morning... dreading monday morning if the other little boy has been saying it to his parents at the weekend..
delphiandomine 83 | 17,734
15 Sep 2012 #4
I don't want to be ignoring the child if he's genuinely trying because at the moment his english is very poor

Do you have any extra support in the class for him?
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
15 Sep 2012 #5
On condition they have the feking time machine. :):):):):)

I am going to greet my neighbours "Bibshite" tomorrow morning, it's the only way to test it if we don't get a native speaker to answer this thread.

If I were Emma I'd say "bibshite" to the child's parent when they bring him to school. See their reaction...

dreading monday morning if the other little boy has been saying it to his parents at the weekend..

It might mean "Miss you are lovely" for all I know! But I doubt it's that innocent! More like a confused fusion of words the child has heard. My mum used to say "ponce" to her nursery teacher!
OP emma c
16 Sep 2012 #6
delpiandomine No not at the moment, there are 3 in my class and 1 of them has better english so we're using him to translate!
I am tempted to ask his parents too see what he means by it, he might end up in trouble though! :( Think i might warn the english boy's parents that he is using it and explain he won't mean anything bad by it...
boletus 30 | 1,366
16 Sep 2012 #7
I am going to greet my neighbours "Bibshite" tomorrow morning, it's the only way to test it if we don't get a native speaker to answer this thread.

It sounds "pieprzysz" to me. :-)
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Sep 2012 #8
lol - you're right, it is!

:o) ale jaja!

translate.google.com/#pl/en/pieprzysz
pawian 161 | 9,971
16 Sep 2012 #9
It sounds "pieprzysz" to me. :-)

:):):)

Sorry guys,

I decided to delay my answers here till Sunday morning. Then, usually, mods are still fast asleep after a Saturday night fever binge. At 9 am Polish Grinicz Time you can write what you want and it doesn`t get binned till Sunday noon or even 2 pm!. :):):):):):):):):):):):):)
OP emma c
16 Sep 2012 #10
Jeez pawian...nonly asked for a bit of help not to get my english attacked... not here to write an assignment to get it judged :) had 4 years of that at university ;)
pawian 161 | 9,971
16 Sep 2012 #11
Come on.

I am only having fun.

Just like you. :):):):)

Aren`t you? :):):)
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Sep 2012 #12
Before the mod bins this one too -

I knew of at least 2 private school primary teachers who for real couldn't spell. One became a Head. Massive salary too.

Emma probably wanted to suggest an informal tone and not intimidate anyone, so she wrote quite casually. The actual structure of her message shows a rather high degree of fluency and flow - she's succinct but she's managed to be casual. She could probably turn her hand to writing interesting fiction or features if she gets bored with teaching, although as ever a decent slice of luck is necessary.
Ziutek 9 | 160
16 Sep 2012 #13
Maybe „witaj/witajcie", roughly pronounced "VEE tie/vee TIE che", which mean the same as "vitam" in InWroclaw's first post. Just a thought.
Zazulka 3 | 129
16 Sep 2012 #14
It sounds "pieprzysz" to me. :-)

bibshite sounds more like spieprzaj to me.
spieprzaj = get lost
pawian 161 | 9,971
16 Sep 2012 #15
Maybe „witaj/witajcie", roughly pronounced "VEE tie/vee TIE che", which mean the same as "vitam" in InWroclaw's first post. Just a thought.

Ziutek, do you suggest that a British teacher writes bibshite when he/she heard VEE tie/vee TIE che"

Do you hold British education at such low esteem? :):):):)
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Sep 2012 #16
spieprzaj = get lost

Erm, that's not what Google says it means. All the possibles begin with F...

translate.google.com/#pl/en/spieprzaj
Zazulka 3 | 129
16 Sep 2012 #17
the translation Google is giving is for spierdalaj
Spieprzaj you can translate as get lost or piss off

spierdalaj is very vulgar, spieprzaj is just not nice

Try to google the famous "spieprzaj, dziadu" :)
Ziutek 9 | 160
16 Sep 2012 #18
Ziutek, do you suggest that a British teacher writes bibshite when he/she heard VEE tie/vee TIE che"

Well, joking apart, V and B are easy to confuse. Not really sure about the T sound at the end, that's why I included witajcie as an option.

And it might be the kid, not the teacher who is getting confused.
boletus 30 | 1,366
16 Sep 2012 #19
Jeez pawian...nonly asked for a bit of help not to get my english attacked... not here to write an assignment to get it judged :) had 4 years of that at university ;)

Emma, we are all having a bit of fun here, because we all came to a common agreement that your "little Polish angel" does in fact curses you - "fuck off" would be a good approximation what he says. Instead of guessing what this little devil did or did not say, just record that damn expression and confront his parents with it. Unfortunately, the reactions might vary: from a hostile atitude to a big feeling of shame.
jon357 63 | 14,169
16 Sep 2012 #20
Spieprzaj you can translate as get lost or piss off

It's almost certainly 'spieprzaj', pronounced a bit like 'speeyepshy' and literally meaning 'fuck off'; though as Zazulka says, it's closer in tone to 'sod off' or bugger off'. It is regarded as obscene and very offensive in Polish.

So, sorry, the little git is telling you to fuck off. If that happened in a Polish primary school, the parents would be informed and there would be something of a minor shitstorm. Just a shame you can't cane them any more ;-)
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Sep 2012 #21
If the Polish parent has been living in Britain for a while, he or she will of course immediately apologise for this embarrassing blunder and promise to get the child to only say "f***k off" in perfect English on future mornings.
sa11y 5 | 331
16 Sep 2012 #22
Spieprzaj DOES NOT mean f***off. F***off is "spierdalaj". Spieprzaj means get lost/ sod off etc, still offensive but nowhere near as bad as "f***off".
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Sep 2012 #23
bibshite sounds more like spieprzaj to me.
spieprzaj = get lost

Someone should tell Google Translate, then, because that's not what GT says ...





emiwis
16 Sep 2012 #24
something that sounds like "bibshite"

there is no way way to tell you what the boy is saying; whatever you hear, you didn't get the transcription right; the word may be 'babcia' - 'granny' if we assume that you've got the first sound right; or 'spieprzaj' - if we focus on the last syllable; or any other combination that matches words starting with 'b' or 'p' and ending with 'szaj' or 'sza' or 'sze' or 'cia' or 'cie'; I do not recall any Polish word that would end with 'szajt'-'shite'.
sa11y 5 | 331
16 Sep 2012 #25
InWroclaw, in the end sod off, bugger off and f*** off all mean the same thing. Similarily to spieprzaj, spadaj, spierdalaj. Goggle is obviously not very sensitive to subtle differences.


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