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Adjective endings for Polish surnames - the role of the suffixes?


Rudy5 13 | 36    
7 Jun 2012  #1
What is the rule for the suffixes? Like -ska -ski and all those. I understand that they change depending on if the person is male or female, would their legal last name be different then? Does it matter what surname it is? Could it be done with Duda for example(which is believed to mean "bagpipes" or "bad musician" and other meanings)?
strzyga 2 | 993    
7 Jun 2012  #2
if the person is male or female, would their legal last name be different then?

yes

Does it matter what surname it is?

it does- some surnames end in ski/ska and some don't

Could it be done with Duda

Dudziński/Dudzińska is the related ski/ska form of Duda, but it's a separate name, actually existing.
OP Rudy5 13 | 36    
  7 Jun 2012  #3
Duda is an existing surname, it happens to be mine. Could you just add the suffix?

If Duda is my surname could a suffix be added onto it? If so what are the rules?
strzyga 2 | 993    
7 Jun 2012  #4
Duda is an existing surname, it happens to be mine.

I know. I know some people named Duda too.

Could you just add the suffix?

No you can't. Ski/ska is an adjectival ending and you need to observe the rules of creating adjectives from nouns in Polish. So the adjectival form would be Dudziński. Dudaski wouldn't make any sense, it's against the rules of the language.
OP Rudy5 13 | 36    
  7 Jun 2012  #5
Thanks, what would Dudziński mean in Polish? Here in the US some people use last names as nicknames, and since nicknames in Polish use the adjective suffixes, could you go by both Duda and Dudziński, if Dudziński was a nickname?

I think I'm looking for diminutive form of Duda.

Ya I looked more on these forums and I now know that I'm looking for the diminutive or "nickname" endings, how would you add the endings onto Duda?
boletus 30 | 1,367    
  7 Jun 2012  #6
I now know that I'm looking for the diminutive or "nickname" endings, how would you add the endings onto Duda?

Forgive me for saying so but "duda" is one of these smile-invoking words; not really funny but the one usually generating friendly response - maybe because of its onomatopoeic sound, or maybe because various associations in people's minds. I listed some derivations from this word in another thread ( Duda Family ), so you should get some understanding why is it so.

Making diminutive words out of the basic ones is quite easy in Polish: kot (a cat) becomes kot-ek or better yet - kot-uś, pies (dog) becomes pies-ek, pies-io or about some other 10 diminutive versions - evoking all sorts of emotions towards that shaggy animal.

Following that pattern with "Duda" one ends up with at least two diminutives: "Dudek" and "Duduś". Problem is, these two words have special meanings by themselves, so they may produce unexpected effects and audience reactions. All positive, but sometimes comical. A loving mother could inadvertently make a young boy a victim of school jokes, by calling him "Duduś" in public, while his real name was Jerry or so. This could happen when a small child had problems with pronunciation of some word, and ended up making "tuta", "duda" or some other such sounds. Some boys carry such nicknames with pride, and later as a badge of honour.

One example is Jerzy "Duduś" Matuszkiewicz (born 1928), a Polish jazz musician and composer,
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerzy_Matuszkiewicz

I do not know who gave him this nickname; it could be an affectionate badge given to him by his fellow musicians.
Ach to był szał / Gdy Duduś grał / Na saksofonie
Oh it was a craze / When Duduś played / The saxophone
[Composed by Matuszkiewicz, lyrics and performance by Wojciech Młynarski (1941), a Polish singer, songwriter and translator. A known figure in the Polish musical scene, he is most famous for sung poetry and ballads.]

Another Polish figure with Dudek nickname was Edward Dziewoński (1916-2002), an actor, director, comedian.
He founded a satirical cabaret "Kabaret Dudek" (1965-1989), which he directed and where he performed with the best Polish actors of those times.

The official meaning of "Dudek" in Polish is a name of a middle size migratory bird (Upupa epops), notable for its distinctive 'crown' of feathers. Its English name is "Hoopoe". Like the Latin name upupa, the English name is an onomatopoetic form which imitates the cry of the bird (up-up-up). The Polish version "dudek" comes from the sound ud-ud-ud. The bird has several folk names in Poland, imitating its call: utek, hupka, ubek, wudwudek, wudwud. Russians call it udod, French huppe.

The word dudek is sometimes used in reference to someone foolish, not very smart.
Polish sayings:
"Każdy dudek ma swój czubek" - Every hoopoe has its crown (Indicating someone immodest, a braggart)
"Wystrychnąć kogoś na dudka" - to fool someone, to cheat.

The diminutive name "Duduś" has many uses. Some shopping centres, specializing in all things for kids, are called "Duduś".
"Duduś Wesołek" (Duduś the Cheerful One) is a very happy piglet who loves mischief and fun. He experiences remarkable adventures together with his friends: Tasia, Mela and Ferdek.

It is used as a dog name too. There are 388 people with surname "Duduś" living in Poland, And there are 46,150 people named "Dudek".
OP Rudy5 13 | 36    
7 Jun 2012  #7
Haha ya I get that a lot, I'm glad that I have it as my last name. Thanks for the info.
Lexus The Killer    
28 Dec 2018  #8
All names are CATASTROPHIC. For instance: Hell; Dorin; Gazda; Satan


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