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How do you add and 'ing' to the end of the verb in Polish? If you do.


drsxyc 1 | -
9 May 2010 #1
Is there an ending to make things from "I am watch TV" to "I am watching TV", "I am write" "I am writing"?
z_darius 14 | 3,968
9 May 2010 #2
No such thing in Polish as -ing or equivalent as Polish does not have the present continuous tense.
Lyzko
10 May 2010 #3
Instead, practically enough, Polish uses verbal "aspects" in order to register the various permuations of the mannifold English tenses:

Piszę list do mojego ojca. = I'm writing a letter to my father. (present continuous)
Napiszę jutro list do mojego ojca. = I will write a letter to my father tomorrow. (future simple)

Pisywuję list do mojego ojca. = I am constantly writing (THE SAME LETTER!!!!) to my father.

etc....
Lyzko
10 May 2010 #4
The gerund equivalent in Polish of our '-ing' DOES exist however, in order to indicate e.g. English 'Running down the street, the man saw a policeman....' or something like this, Polish uses '-ący' which shows a type of action in progress, but this is more common in writing than in speech, at least in my experience:-)
Lyzko
12 May 2010 #6
Dziękuję:-) Wzory konjugacjii są niełatwe LOL
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595
15 May 2010 #7
No such thing in Polish as -ing or equivalent.

This is the simple and correct answer. :)
Lyzko
15 May 2010 #8
What about those '-ący(a)(e)' endings though with certain gerund-style look-alike structures, e.g. 'Idący na ulice.....'. Sure, it's not super common, yet IS grammatically correct under given circumstances, no? Even Swedish, certainly closer to English than to either Polish or Spanish (Yo hablando = I am speaking vs. Yo hablo = I speak and both only '(Ja)mówię' in Polish cf. '(Ja) mawiam', possible yet unlikely.), has no '-ing' equivalent or even a continuous form.

Polish therefore has indeed its own "spin", so to speak, on English '-ing'. It's simply reflected differently.

For my two złoty worth-:))) lol
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 May 2010 #9
Siedzący na ławce would be sitting on the bench, right? I agree with Lyzko here, they just have a different way of looking at it. It certainly has a different character from how we contrast the infinitive and gerund, e.g I remember locking and I remembered to lock. A little differently, I stopped to smoke and I stopped smoking. Poles tend to use the ing form as more btw than we do, like when you start a story.
Lyzko
15 May 2010 #10
....and seemingly NEVER get it right in English, my countless ESL-students from Poland are/were ample testament to that:

"I stopped talking to Tomek yesterday on street, but not had many time...."

Likewise, "our" aspectial booboos (speaking primarily of myself here LOL), surely cause countless grimaces from Poles, PRAWDA???!!
enkidu 7 | 623
15 May 2010 #11
Lyzko:
Pisywuję

"Pisuję", I guess?

Well it's more like "I write a letter from time to time"
Lyzko
15 May 2010 #12
...as opposed to 'POpisać' (even 'popiSYWać'???)

It never ends, does it LOL
enkidu 7 | 623
15 May 2010 #13
popiSYWać

That's rather mean "to show off". You know - when somebody are trying to impress others with his/hers allegen awesomeness.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
15 May 2010 #14
e.g. 'Idący na ulice.....'. Sure, it's not super common, yet IS grammatically correct under given circumstances, no?

No, that should be 'Idąc ulicą' or 'Idąc po ulicy'

Yo hablo = I speak and both only '(Ja)mówię' in Polish cf. '(Ja) mawiam', possible yet unlikely.), has no '-ing' equivalent or even a continuous form.

Bag to differ 'Ja tu teraz przemawiam' I'm speaking now.

Polish therefore has indeed its own "spin", so to speak, on English '-ing'. It's simply reflected differently.

Indeed, that it does.
Lyzko
15 May 2010 #15
Ya never stop learnin' 'round here, do ya:-)

Good to know, gang!

'Bag to differ.."

You 'bag', and I'll 'beg' LOL
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
15 May 2010 #16
You 'bag', and I'll 'beg' LOL

Niceeeee! LOL Ya never stop learnin
Lyzko
15 May 2010 #17
:-))))) Touche there, pal!!

Sorta like the oldest known sentence ever discovered in the Polish language:
(freely translated!) "You rest, I'll grind."

LOL

P.S. A linguistics student from Spain recently gave a lecture entitled 'The Great Bowel Shift', for a course at the University of East Anglia. Who survived the laughing fit??


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