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Polish - Absolute Beginner Questions. Study plan.


RealPolish - | 11
12 Mar 2011 #31
I'm using this range of books (with a teacher) and like them very much

My husband, on the other hand, prefers to focus much more on listening

Yeah, the most important thing in learning anything is to have fun with it!
Darek Polish
23 Apr 2015 #32
Merged: Polish alphabet

Hi guys. I bet you know Polish alphabet, but does everyone know how to really speak it? This is my tip for you: youtube.com/watch?v=_RIB15ZjuYo

It's 100% on YT
jon357 74 | 22,469
23 Apr 2015 #33
Given that some immigrants/expats/whatever have lived here for decades and speak nothing else at home, plus read books, write lectures and function entirely in Polish for long periods, you bet right, people do "know the alphabet". And yes, some people here "really speak it". It isn't exactly an obscure or rarely learnt language like Basque, Wymysorys or Caucasian Gothic.
vvs_shank - | 2
25 Mar 2017 #34
Merged:

Study Polish



how can I study polish easily ??
mafketis 37 | 10,880
25 Mar 2017 #35
First there is no such thing as learning or studying Polish "easily" unless your first language is another Slavic language.

Your first language and any foreign languages you know and your learning style all have to be taken into consideration.

What are your languages (native and learned) and how do you learn things? (are you more analytic? intuitive? can you make inference or do you want everything to be explicit?
Lyzko 45 | 9,513
25 Mar 2017 #36
Learning a language such as Polish, unlike French, Spanish, even basic German, requires nearly monastic concentration and almost laser focus, especially at the beginning!

Whereas with certain of the above three other languages I mentioned, it's remotely possible to pick up the occasional vocabulary, phrases etc. while, say, listening on a CD while in the shower, over morning coffee, driving to work or some such deal, Polish ain't gonna afford most such luxury of learning leisure:-)

For a rank novice such as what most beginners are, I'd stress simple yet consistent dictation practice, right from day one!!! Like calisthenics for dine tuning one's body, dictations will strengthen your comprehension as well as oral skills at the very start, Slavic sounds often being so, so different from Western ones.

Mind-numbingly repetitive as this advice sounds, it worked for me, as no other language actually prepared me for the Haunted House ride that was Polish until at least a year of serious study.

Hope this helps a trifle.
tarsape@gmail
Lyzko 45 | 9,513
27 Mar 2017 #37
Addendum to yesterday's message.

If you're an aboslute beginner, you can also try labeling certain basic objects in your house/apartment in Polish, for instance ściana" (wall), "drzwi" (door), "stół" (table),"krzesło" (chair) etc. and this way everyday things will become anchored in your brain:-)

Just a thought!
Polonius3 990 | 12,349
27 Mar 2017 #38
certain basic objects in your house

Good idea but should be expanded. In a notebook (or on the computer) set up different categories: family members, vehicles, fruits, livestock, wildlife, buildings, occupations, emotiosn, ideologies, countries, -- the sky is the limit. And as you run across a new word add it to the proper column. That is an excellent way of vocabualry building.
Lyzko 45 | 9,513
27 Mar 2017 #39
Agree, Polonius! Furthermore, it goes without saying that such labels should ONLY contain the Polish word, zero translation, otherwise the poor learner will continue to do little but keep translating back into their native language and won't really learn to think in Polish:-)

Famous Russian-American language buff/pedagogue, Boris Shekman, just passed yesterday. What I as a career language instructor found fascinating in his obit. was his method of getting ordinary Joes, along with top US-diplomats, to converse in "real" colloquial Russian, something they never learned in college courses.

He stressed the "be thrown into cold water head first" approach, that is, being tossed into a solely target-language speaking situation where NOBODY speaks or understands English.

Sink or swim!
Polonius3 990 | 12,349
27 Mar 2017 #40
thrown into cold water

That's called the Berlitz total-immersion method. At lunch if you don't say "Darf ich um den Pfeffer bitten" or "Czy można poprosić o pieprz" you eat a bland and insipid lunch. Or find yourself a non-English-speaking girlfriend which is doubly motivaitng. You don't want to come off as a moron so you really try. Except that their wives didn't appreciate such advice! (LOL)
delphiandomine 88 | 18,116
27 Mar 2017 #41
Polonius, just out of interest, how do you handle language in your own home? Do you speak Polish first, or English, or a mix?
Lyzko 45 | 9,513
27 Mar 2017 #42
Yep, sort of the same way I learned SwedishLOL

Two semesters at grad school behind me, knew squat before I went over to the country, and had a good enough accent I guess so that literally NOONE in all of Goteborg spoke to me in English for nearly the entire week of my initial stay:-) My conversational ability took off like a rocket and remains fairly active until today.

By the time I got to Poland, some ten years later, I was savvy enough to have learned both the language as well as the basics of the culture. There though, the difference was that I had to communicate in Polish as nobody in Szczcecin at the time would even admit to speaking English (or German)!
Polonius3 990 | 12,349
27 Mar 2017 #43
handle language

Speak Polish with the Mrs, English with our son and German, French and Russian with others as needed. And when I'm back in Polonia I say things like: Nasza nejberka klinuje ofisy, a jej mąż wczoraj zostawił karę na hajłeju bo mu gazoliny zabrakło. Also: Bojsy się fajtują na sajdłoku. 'Oh yes, I speak Swahili with the "daughter" your guru LL claims we've got (LOL)!
Lyzko 45 | 9,513
27 Mar 2017 #44
Your son is quite fortunate, Polonius! My mother too insisted that I grow up with at least two languages.
NoToForeigners 9 | 994
28 Mar 2017 #45
Nasza nejberka klinuje ofisy, a jej mąż wczoraj zostawił karę na hajłeju bo mu gazoliny zabrakło. Also: Bojsy się fajtują na sajdłoku.

That's disgusting beyond imagination. Makes me sick.
Polonius3 990 | 12,349
28 Mar 2017 #46
disgusting

Just joking. Jo tok nie godom... I don't really speak that way, but I am fully conversant in that jargon having been brought up in its midst.
Lyzko 45 | 9,513
28 Mar 2017 #47
It's "Angielpolski", that's all, like "Engleutsch" for the Germans, "Franglais" for the French.....
Ziemowit 14 | 4,258
28 Mar 2017 #48
Nasza nejberka klinuje ofisy, a jej mąż wczoraj zostawił karę na hajłeju bo mu gazoliny zabrakło. Also: Bojsy się fajtują na sajdłoku.

I find it quite amusing. But a Polish person who doesn't know English will find it uncomprehensible.

That reminds me of those Silesians who speak Silesian with many German words in it and claim it is a Silesian language. Likewise, many non-Silesian people may not understand it, but I doubt it will be the Silesian language because of those German words in it.
NoToForeigners 9 | 994
28 Mar 2017 #49
It's "Angielpolski

It's called "Ponglish". Nobody calls it "Angielpolski". I know you are an expert about "all things Polish" but sadly you're mistaken (yet again...).

To someone who loves Polish it sounds awful. I can just imagine it sounds same for Anglophones.
Ponglish basically is a mutilation of both languages that together create that abberation.

I find it quite amusing.

Many ex-Poles do.
Polonius3 990 | 12,349
28 Mar 2017 #50
Silesian

How do you say in Silesia "The train is hooting in the forest"?
Antwort: Wyje bana w lesie!
delphiandomine 88 | 18,116
28 Mar 2017 #51
bana

Isn't Bana (or banna) more of a Poznań word than Silesian?
Lyzko 45 | 9,513
28 Mar 2017 #52
...derived from the German "Bahn", and used solely among Silesian dialect speakers:-)
delphiandomine 88 | 18,116
28 Mar 2017 #53
and used solely among Silesian dialect speakers:-)

Not solely, gwara poznański is full of Polonised German words, including bana/banna.
Lyzko 45 | 9,513
28 Mar 2017 #54
NoToForeigners,

Indeed it does! For this reason, I "go ballistic", as the saying goes, whenever I read your, Crow's, Ironside's or Wulkan's English-language posts because they are typically littered with mistakes which they claim are not important:-) I at least admit to error when I'm at fault, even in my mother tongue(s).

Learning correct English requires the same degree of diligence as learning Polish. The former being an analytic language, simply reduced the morphological complexity of a language like Polish.

As I've often said, another excellent learning aid is watching Polish TV without English subtitles, but instead, with Polish captions in order to see what the speakers are saying!!

@Delph, thanks! I meant to indicate with "Silesian" any and all formerly German-speaking regions of Poland in which spillover loan translation words were/are still used.

I've done same for other languages and it really works.
NoToForeigners 9 | 994
29 Mar 2017 #55
Crow's

Even Crow's English is many times better than your Polish.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,854
29 Mar 2017 #56
Crow's, Ironside's or Wulkan's English-language posts because they are typically littered with mistakes which they claim are not important:

all those three speak/write excellent English. Have to agree with Notty here. It seems really provincial and arrogant to complain about this kind of learner making a few errors.
Polonius3 990 | 12,349
29 Mar 2017 #58
"Franglais"

In Montréal there is a sign on a cemetery fence: Défense de trépasser as a translation of No trespassing. In normal French it means "no dying allowed".
Lyzko 45 | 9,513
29 Mar 2017 #59
There you go! Such faux amis are the stuff which make language learning both fun and practical.

I must have mentioned my own similar (yet less invasive) false friend pickle I found myself in when in Czech Republic some years back, whereupon I totally innocently remarked, thinking in Polish, that I thought my host's beer was stale and that his house smelled:-)

Both never quite got over that one, but rest assured, yours truly never made the same mistake AGAIN!!!

@NoToForeigners,
Sir, you are nothing other than a contrarian. Certainly my Polish could stand continued improvement, yet so could the English of both yourself and some others here on PF. DIfference being that I'm grateful for correction, while you aren't.
NoToForeigners 9 | 994
29 Mar 2017 #60
DIfference being that I'm grateful for correction, while you aren't.

Rofl. How do you even know that? You have never tried to do it. Never seen you trying to explain things to the three you mentioned either. All you do is trying to insist that mine and the others English is poor by pointing out our errors which in fact are considered just minor by many Anglophones even in this thread while making HUGE and FUNDAMENTAL errors in Polish that make you barely understandable (like basically translating from Polish word-to-word. "Jaki jest kolor bluzka?" or "Prętkość nie oznaczy jakości").

I really doubt that Crow or any one else of the three would have any problems with "What color is that blouse?" and wouldn't ever confuse "Speed doesn't mean quality" with "Speed won't mark quality".

PS. Prędkość is spelled with "D" not "T".


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