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Witamy, Guest  |  Members
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Poles and Russians -- love-hate relationship?



rohit21sa 1 | 8    
9 Dec 2007  #61

I live in a house with a polish family and we have a girl from russia and she share room with another polish girl. They are very good friend


witek 1 | 588    
9 Dec 2007  #62

and we have a girl from russia and she share room with another polish girl.

do they have a web cam?



Lukasz 49 | 1,751    
11 Dec 2007  #63

I dont think that Poles hate Russians, We have more problems on state level (mentioned here), but when we look on people relationships it looks much better.
PoleAmerican 2 | 12    
1 Jan 2009  #64

Crow, Russia has used and abused her fellow Slav's in the past and will do the same in the future. Russia is a member of the Slavic family that has repeatedly robbed and victimized it's fellow family members and has lost it's place in the family. Russia would readily use Panslavism as an excuse to rob and bully her Slavic blood brothers again if given the chance. Poles and other non-Russian Slavs are smart to be vigilant towards Russia.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259    
2 Jan 2009  #65

Really? And how about Russo-Turkish wars for independence of Bulgaria, Romania, Serbs? And how about first Greek republic on Korfu?
Borrka 37 | 594    
3 Jan 2009  #66

Living in the past is Russian SPÉCIALITÉ DE LA MAISON, Kostik.
Who cares about Shipka pass battle today?
Once, I asked Bulgarian teens about "liberation" and they thought Stoletov was a Russian cosmonaut lol.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259    
3 Jan 2009  #67

Really? Ha-ha! Borrka, Borrka. If you asked them correctly, you would obtain better results. May be Stoletov was cosmonaut, I don't know, but general who liberated Bulgaria was Skobelev. Sko-be-lev, do you remember?

BTW, we have other names in our history, Su-vo-rov for example. Do you know him?
Borrka 37 | 594    
3 Jan 2009  #68

Saaay Kostik, are you trying to test my brilliant intellect and knowledge ?
I do not care much about any Russian generals (with exception of Starynkiewicz).

Stoletov peak is a place in Bulgaria where the Shipka monument is located lol.
Enjoy !
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259    
3 Jan 2009  #69

But you should care about them, because otherwise they shell take care about you upon them.
Borrka 37 | 594    
3 Jan 2009  #70

There is something I'm deeply ashamed of.
About 1/3 commanding officers (regular, not the draft) fighting this campaign were Poles.
For me traitors like your Vlasov.
But keep it top secret, Kostik...pls.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259    
3 Jan 2009  #71

Certainly, Alexander II and Skobelev were Poles as well. Our Lord Jesus was Pole too.
Prince 15 | 592    
3 Jan 2009  #72

And for British members of this forum who like to look on nationality using different keys...

British foreign affairs minister. Brit? Jew? or Pole ?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Miliband

Born in London, David Miliband is the elder son of Polish-born Marion Kozak and the late Belgian-born Marxist intellectual Ralph Miliband.

Both paternal grandparents lived in the Jewish quarter of Warsaw.

Borrka 37 | 594    
3 Jan 2009  #73

Our Lord Jesus was Pole too.

I would rather say Polish Jew.
But for sure Polish Patriot and russophobe as well.
No way around it.
celinski 31 | 1,260    
3 Jan 2009  #74

About 1/3 commanding officers (regular, not the draft) fighting this campaign were Poles.

During what time line?
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259    
3 Jan 2009  #75

Borrka you are blasphemer! Jesus hardly might had been -phobe! You risk to be excommunicated from Catholic church!
Borrka 37 | 594    
3 Jan 2009  #76

ou risk to be excommunicated from Catholic church!

Thanx God not from the ROC !

During what time line?

Maybe two years ?
I don't know exactly.
jwojcie 2 | 763    
3 Jan 2009  #77

Past, past, past... Current Polish-German relationships shows that even the worst past can be overcome. Twenty years, and maybe not in love with each other but in relative good cooperation. There are current problems which are mostly producing tensions. Poland and Russia have just opposite geopolitical interests. And it is about Ukraine, Belarus and Baltic States. Poland wants them to be like Poland -> independent, democratic and... in EU or at least in good relationship with EU. Russia wants them to be like Russia, which means to be in Russia... Both countries see that interests as the most important ones. So both countries are in never ending wrestling. And because of that sometimes some not very good statements shows up on our goverments level, and this sometimes look like hate...

Obviously we can now start discussion like "is there any difference between EU and USSR?" or "is Ukraine a real country?" but maybe not in that thread.

For now problem is like this: Russia is trying to preserve current status quo till will gather enough power to grab what She things belongs to her. And because of that on Poland east frontier there is dictatorship in Belarus and always in some troubles Ukraine. And this is just not good for the bussiness. And no, unfortunatelly Poland can't let it go. Because putting aside all big fears about Poland own independence, in the current state of Russia, Belarus and Ukraine in Russia means, that for every little thing, even for changing little bolt, one would have to go to Moscow, and this is even worse for bussiness.

PS. err... my English... I know, pls don't crucify me :-)
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259    
3 Jan 2009  #78

We will crucify you for your thoughts.
jwojcie 2 | 763    
3 Jan 2009  #79

I hope you will have to go all the way to Moscow for bolts/nails to do that... ;-)
DtLebowski 1 | 26    
4 Jan 2009  #80

Witam!

I have been wondering about this question, and this seems a good way to ask number of Poles at the same time.

How would you say that do (or do not) Polish people in general feel _some_ similarity in cultural way with Russian people (in different way than you do feel similarity with some Western peoples)?

I ask this because of my interest towards ex-Eastern Europe, and cause I have notices similarities in manners and daily/social culture of Polish and Russian people (for examples: the old habit of hand-kissing of women for hello, everyone is given nicknames (po polsku: Maciej->Maciek, po rosku: Alexandr->Sasha etc. etc.), people celebrate the day of their firstnames (imieny?) in both countries, also in language there is lot of similarities (but maybe this is another subject as I have understood that the Slavic language families are the most closest to each other).

In this post I don't want to go to the conflict side (at least not at the beginning).

So please tell me what do you think. Prosze.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259    
4 Jan 2009  #81

I never kiss woman's hands as greeting. This custom is so bizarre and ostentation...., so polish. Moreover, it is unhygienic.
celinski 31 | 1,260    
4 Jan 2009  #82

Maybe two years ?
I don't know exactly.

I know that some were conscriped and first chance they got they bolted to Polish army, then the ones released upon amnesty from Siberia meet up under British command. Although Poland and Soviets were "allies" most from the east refused to fight with them. Poland was Poland's Army Under British command. I was just wondering what time line you were referring to and which Polish, in the east saw a differant side right away.

Putin is just a figment of the worlds imagination?

Putin is the one that is destroying the relationship with others outside of Putin's Kremlin.
Sasha 2 | 1,083    
5 Jan 2009  #83

I ask this because of my interest towards ex-Eastern Europe, and cause I have notices similarities in manners and daily/social culture of Polish and Russian people (for examples: the old habit of hand-kissing of women for hello, everyone is given nicknames (po polsku: Maciej->Maciek, po rosku: Alexandr->Sasha etc. etc.), people celebrate the day of their firstnames (imieny?) in both countries, also in language there is lot of similarities (but maybe this is another subject as I have understood that the Slavic language families are the most closest to each other).

You're mostly right. Russians and Poles have a lot in common but the actual state of affairs doesn't allow them to extend a hand to each other.

As for the language according to method of M. Svodesh we've got 77% of the vocabulary in common which ranks the Polish language #3 in terms of similarity with Russian (after Belorussian and Ukranian) among other slavic languages.
slick77 - | 127    
5 Jan 2009  #84

speaking of kissing and hygiene...
jwojcie 2 | 763    
5 Jan 2009  #85

DtLebowski, similarities are overestimated by foreigners... Of course they are, mainly in language field, but cultures are as different as any other two neighbouring cultures in Europe can be. And I would say even more, mainly because old and not so long ago very important distinction between latin Europe (where modern Poland originate) and Orthodox Europe (where modern Russia originate). As some Russian writer wrote in XIX century about Poles: "soul is stronger than blood". So, even if Poles share a lot of blood (genes) with Russians, their soul (culture) is different and prevails over blood. I don't say worse or better, just different. And last but not least, Russia is far to big to be compared in that way. It is after all multinational and postcolonial country.
DtLebowski 1 | 26    
5 Jan 2009  #86

Dziekuje i spasiba for answering my question Sasha i jwocie.

Then again, question to Poles and Russians (and Ukrainians) (and why not to any other Slavs, but I try to keep this in shape): Would you say that you are 'brother' or 'cousin' nations with each other (for example the ancient Slavic story about the three brothers "Lech, Czech i Rus" is known _at least_ in Poland and Czech Rp., different version also at least in Croatia)? (Even if it means brothers or counsins who argue).

And do feel brothers with Ukrainians (obvious Russian influense combined with historical Polish influense) ?

Edit: Also the story about Baba Yaga is widely known in Slavic speaking world.
celinski 31 | 1,260    
5 Jan 2009  #87

Russians and Poles have a lot in common but the actual state of affairs doesn't allow them to extend a hand to each other.

Has anyone questioned the use of black masks by Russian police in the raid where the files on Stalin were stored? Seemed to me this is not like getting a warrant and ceasing material but rather a criminal act.

Memorial's St. Petersburg branch has been researching and documenting Stalin's crimes for 20 years, building one of the world's most complete archives of one of the darkest chapters in Russia's history.

ajc.com/services/content/printedition/2008/12/26/stalin.htm l

Could it be the Goverment of Russia puts a wedge between the Russian and Polish people?
Sasha 2 | 1,083    
5 Jan 2009  #88

Then again, question to Poles and Russians (and Ukrainians) (and why not to any other Slavs, but I try to keep this in shape): Would you say that you are 'brother' or 'cousin' nations with each other (for example the ancient Slavic story about the three brothers "Lech, Czech i Rus" is known _at least_ in Poland and Czech Rp., different version also at least in Croatia)? (Even if it means brothers or counsins who argue).

My friend this strongly depends on particular man. Speaking for Russian part I would say that Russians mostly don't care about any kind of "brethren" or smth... last years they've mostly cared about their personal wellbeing. I wouldn't say that Russians are hostile towards Poles even though there were lots of antipolish propoganda spitted out by Russian media (yet those are not comparable with antirussian propoganda of polish media). There're many groups and Russian internet resources dedicated to Poland and Poles. I'm the one of many who are attracted by Polish nation.

Just for your info... "liakh" (derived from "Lech") is I believe the oldest nick for Poles in Russian language (unlike to Polish Russian language doesn't have any offensive nicks for Poles).

As for Ukranians... I guess communists completely erased the boundary between two our nations. For me it's usually hard to say even by accent whether this or that man is from Ukraine or from Russia (even if one has specific pronunciation of "g" turning to "h" - for instance golova rus=hlava cze he could be just from the south of Russia). On the whole I don't know what's difference between us apart from colors of our passports.

Has anyone questioned the use of black masks by Russian police in the raid where the files on Stalin were stored? Seemed to me this is not like getting a warrant and ceasing material but rather a criminal act.

Celinski I don't see any connection between the words you cited and another your fit od madness. Sorry.
celinski 31 | 1,260    
5 Jan 2009  #89

don't see any connection

That is not very suprizing.

but the actual state of affairs doesn't allow them to extend a hand to each other.

Look you do get it. :)
Prince 15 | 592    
5 Jan 2009  #90

Sasha Poles are the purest Slavic nation on the world (if we look for ancestry connection). Russians are east Slavic nation so there are similarities.

"liakh" (derived from "Lech") is I believe the oldest nick for Poles in Russian language (unlike to Polish Russian language doesn't have any offensive nicks for Poles).

Pshek ?

On the whole I don't know what's difference between us apart from colors of our passports.

I see many differences and many smiliarities but one thing is sure... Poles are not Russians. Irish are not English. Belgians are not French. There are many similarities between this all nations but they are not the same. Poland has long tradition of fighting for its independence ... so lets make it clear.




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