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Why have Poles contributed so little to Academics? (Particularly Science)



ShortHairThug - | 1,104    
15 Oct 2011  #61

Link or it didn't happen.

brussels-innova.com/eureka/medals.aspx


delphiandomine 87 | 15,787    
15 Oct 2011  #62

Unfortunately, the link provided shows there to be not many participants, and also : Romania won a shed-load of medals too.

Do try harder.
Wroclaw 45 | 5,409    
15 Oct 2011  #63

the link provided shows there to be not many participants,

it says 450
ShortHairThug - | 1,104    
15 Oct 2011  #64

Romania won a shed-load of medals too.

For all the bad rap they get even Romanians prove to be smarter than your average Jew, go figure.
boletus 30 | 1,367    
15 Oct 2011  #65

Does this count as science?

Polish Cipher Bureau (Biuro Szyfrów) is comparable to National Codes and Cipher Centre (Blechley Park) or to modern American National Security Agency. So as such it is not science but organization, which however, employs people who conduct science per se - cryptography/cryptology, rooted in mathematics and computer science.

As a matter of fact, the article you linked, mentions three world-famous professors of mathematics, who used breaking Soviet codes — Stefan Mazurkiewicz, Wacław Sierpiński and Stanisław Leśniewski. They were in fact part of so-called Polish School of Mathematics. But I have already mentioned them before. To compensate for a disappointment, I attach a small fractal - Sierpinski's Triangle. Yes, this is the same guy. :-)

Jerzy Różycki, Marian Rejewski and Henryk Zygalski - the Enigma guys, initially trained at Poznań University - were already mentioned too in this thread. And again, they were mathematicians (but not from Polish School of Mathematics), employing mathematical principles - probability theory, graph theory and such. But the article you pointed out is interesting - as it shows all that background.


  • Sierpinski's Triangle
joepilsudski 26 | 1,394    
15 Oct 2011  #66

It seems Poles haven't contributed much to academia. Very few Poles have won a Nobel Prize in an academic subject. Even Poland's Jewish minority has won more Nobel Prizes than the Christian majority. What's the reason for this?

Poles have contributed much to academia...As far as the Nobel prize, a Polish mathematician won either last year or the year before.

Jews have made it a point to 'guerrilla' academia, and this is why you will find them prominent, in publicity terms, in 'affairs acameme'...Same for the the committees that award various prizes, including Nobel.

Jews are also 'prominent' in the at world, but show me a good Jewish artist, other than maybe Szyk...They produce ugly crap.
JonnyM 12 | 2,634    
15 Oct 2011  #67

They were in fact part of so-called Polish School of Mathematics. But I have already mentioned them before. To compensate for a disappointment, I attach a small fractal - Sierpinski's Triangle. Yes, this is the same guy. :-)

There are some amazing photos of those guys in the Academy of Sciences building. Stefan Banach too.
Amathyst 19 | 2,705    
15 Oct 2011  #68

Jack W. Szostak*, Physiology or Medicine, 2009

Jack William Szostak (born November 9, 1952)[2] is a Canadian American[3] biologist of Polish British descent and Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and Alexander Rich Distinguished Investigator at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. He was awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, along with Elizabeth Blackburn and Carol W. Greider, for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres.

"My grandparents emigrated from Poland to the U.S.A. I was born in London, and then lived in Canada. Unfortunately, I do not speak Polish, but I eagerly confess to my Polish roots"

He's on the the United Kingdom list....But is proud of his Polish heritage.
nynicki - | 31    
15 Oct 2011  #69

Here is another one,controversial but neverless contributed great deal to the society

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanislaw_Burzynski

burzynskimovie.com
Ironside 46 | 8,407    
15 Oct 2011  #70

This thread still going ?Do not tell me that some troll keep you going for weeks?
boletus 30 | 1,367    
16 Oct 2011  #71

There are some amazing photos of those guys in the Academy of Sciences building. Stefan Banach too.

You know, it still continues to amaze me that Polish School of Mathematics started as a vision of a well planned and executed program that actually succeeded.

The ... article `On the Needs of Mathematics in Poland' by Zygmunt Janiszewski outlined the plan for what was to be the Polish School of Mathematics. He urged that a commission should be formed to undertake the organization of mathematics, that an effort should be made to identify and retain talented students as early as secondary school, and that a center for mathematical research should be created; he felt that it was important to create a stimulating mathematical atmosphere and to foster contacts between mathematical co-workers (One effect of this was that many Polish articles were multi-authored; today, Internet collaboration is having a similar effect).

His two main recommendations, however, were especially innovative, and would eventually prove to be highly effective: first, that Poland should have the majority of its mathematicians concentrate their work in a single branch of mathematics; second, that there be created an international journal of mathematics (accepting papers in English, French, German, and Italian) concentrating in a narrow area of mathematics.

wfu.edu/~kuz/Stamps/PolishSchool/PolishSchool.htm
czar 1 | 143    
16 Oct 2011  #72

jewish attorneys invented trolling

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_notation
Sebastian 6 | 108    
16 Oct 2011  #73

This thread is stupid. There were/are many Polish people who contributed to the sciences. Many of the posters listed a lot of them. I'll add one more to the list. Bronislaw Malinowski. He is the founder of social anthropology.
f stop 25 | 2,528    
16 Oct 2011  #74

the title of this thread is so trollish.
Sebastian 6 | 108    
16 Oct 2011  #75

I should have said that instead.
czar 1 | 143    
16 Oct 2011  #76

hes betting on that the casual observer will read the title alone and not bother reading the thread.

so then the title(s) itself becomes the thread.

it should read why am i trolling PF (history in particular)
pawian 127 | 6,555    
16 Oct 2011  #77

Oops, I forgot the Risings. Sorry.
isthatu2 4 | 2,710    
16 Oct 2011  #78

Bronislaw Malinowski. He is the founder of social anthropology.

thanks, I knew I wasnt cracking up...I just got my Bronislaw Malinowski mixed up with my Jacob Bronowski :)
pawian 127 | 6,555    
16 Oct 2011  #79

His best known book is Sex and Repression in Savage Society!

I read it when a child. Fascinating reading.

s
Seanus 15 | 19,748    
16 Oct 2011  #80

Polonthemeds, Copernicus was NOT fully Polish and that's just a fact. Neither was he fully German for those that claim he was.

Nobody has mentioned the great Jan Miodek. He has really raised the profile of Polish philology and linguistics. A deep thinker with an analytical mind.
Grzegorz_ 52 | 6,190    
16 Oct 2011  #81

However, in modern times it seems Poles are lagging behind in fields such as astronomy, biology, chemistry, and physics.

Astronomy in Poland is actually quite strong, maybe not top 3 in the world but definitely at least top 15.

The reason why Polish science doesn't have much international achievements is not really communism and especially not the war... but domestic pathologies like lack of pressure on scientists to actually make some real inventions, not just produce tonnes of useless papers... complicated procedures regarding patents, hardly any cooperation between scientists and business, hadly any venture capital etc. which all together create anti-innovation environment and when nevertheless Poles invent something, often someone else makes money on it, see blue laser for example. Once these things are fixed, we should easily make it to upper 2nd global leage within a decade as that's a natural place for Poland. More than that would be very difficult as a country is simply too small to be a super power of any kind.
Ironside 46 | 8,407    
16 Oct 2011  #82

Astronomy in Poland is actually quite strong, maybe not top 3 in the world but definitely at least top 15.

Yes, why do not tall him that you take shower everyday not twice a year and that you know what electricity is ?

Gee, you are an easy meat for a troll.

Why Poles contributed so little ? In comparison to whom?
pawian 127 | 6,555    
16 Oct 2011  #83

=Ironside]
Why Poles contributed so little ? In comparison to whom?

Germans?
Seanus 15 | 19,748    
16 Oct 2011  #84

Or Scots :)
Grzegorz_ 52 | 6,190    
16 Oct 2011  #85

I'm not really intending to discuss anything with this guy (Harry, Delphi or whoever he is) but people bringing up "Copernicus" or saying that Polish science is crap due to WW2 made me to write a few lines on real problems of Polish science...
Ironside 46 | 8,407    
16 Oct 2011  #86

Because they enjoyed life and others were struggling to survive on scraps !
isthatu2 4 | 2,710    
16 Oct 2011  #87

Or J.............ugoslavians ;)
boletus 30 | 1,367    
17 Oct 2011  #88

I'm not really intending to discuss anything with this guy (Harry, Delphi or whoever he is) but people bringing up "Copernicus" or saying that Polish science is crap due to WW2 made me to write a few lines on real problems of Polish science...

I know your intentions were good, but please stop apologizing. There is nothing to ashamed of. Your astronomy example is good, so let me expand a bit:

Scientists discover around 600 gravitational lensing events every year within the OGLE project, which positions them as world leaders in this field. The project, based at Warsaw University, uses a dedicated 1.3-metre telescope mounted in Las Campanas in Chile. The OGLE Web Site is available at ogle.astrouw.edu.pl.

Almost 300 extrasolar planets have been discovered so far, with as many as 13 objects by the OGLE team: lead by Udalski, Kubiak, Szymanski, Pietrzynski. Also other Polish astronomers made notable planetary discoveries, namely Aleksander Wolszczan (the first ever extrasolar planets), Maciej Konacki (a planet in a triple star system), Andrzej Niedzielski (a planet around a red giant) or Krzysztof Gozdziewski (who, by means of theoretical calculations, found a fourth planet in a system where other observers had seen only three objects), Kozłowski, Pojmański.

(There is an OGLE thread somewhere on PF, which I started long ago)

Personally, I was trying to keep my contribution to this thread at reasonably low profile - mostly responding to direct attacks from trolls, or expanding on some cases. But unfortunately this cannot be handled this way, because everybody has their own tactics: ranging from complete disregard of trolls, to apologizing, to giving trivial examples.
BBman - | 345    
17 Oct 2011  #89

The reason why Polish science doesn't have much international achievements is not really communism and especially not the war...

I wanted to post something like this, good post.

I also think that the partitions made life for scientists difficult. Some scientists, like skłodowska, pursued their studies/work regardless of the situation in Poland. I'm sure many just threw in the towel or succumbed to the policies of germanization or russification.
Seanus 15 | 19,748    
17 Oct 2011  #90

It unquestionably had an impact. Poland has great potential in this area.




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