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Why have Poles contributed so little to Academics? (Particularly Science)


boletus 30 | 1,366
14 Oct 2011 #31
Bright as he is, he might win the Nobel prize pretty soon.

If this this is your objection, then you have to rephrase your original post. I am not claiming any Polish Nobel prize winners - for historical reasons given to you by the others before. But I am challenging you on the basis of your own loaded statement:

However, in modern times it seems Poles are lagging behind in fields such as astronomy, biology, chemistry, and physics.

Oh, oh - you are so wrong. So I understand that you are not challenging Żurek on meritorious grounds? Now, let me go to the next step from the same, or similar category:

Artur Ekert - Born in Poland, educated in Poland, Msc. in Jagiellonian University of Cracow (1985), Ph.D. Oxford (1991), now Oxford. Is he Polish/British/Jewish? I have no idea, but I would advice you not to personally ask him about it if you do not want to get slapped in the face. He is a famous theoretical expert in quantum cryptography.

Five Polish quantum cryptography gurus to go ...
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
14 Oct 2011 #32
someone with a ridiculous screen name i don't feel like typing out wrote:

America: hollywood/CNN/talkshows/arts = all polish jews :)

yeah, i'm just gonna go ahead and call BS on that one.
Davidson613
14 Oct 2011 #33
^It's no use arguing with you. How about you read usernames before you try to debate. That wasn't my quote. I'm not the OP.

My bad, that last post was aimed at boletus.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
14 Oct 2011 #34
someone with a ridiculous screen name i don't feel like typing out wrote:

America: hollywood/CNN/talkshows/arts = all polish jews :)

yeah, i'm just gonna go ahead and call BS on that one.
cornel
14 Oct 2011 #35
Poland was partitioned for what, 250 years? They weren't a nation until approximately 1920 so of course scientific research doesn't go on in such an environment. In order to have research you have to have political stability.
a.k.
14 Oct 2011 #36
If that would be a real question I would answer it. But since it's just a provocation I won't.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Oct 2011 #37
Copernicus was not fully Polish and nobody can claim he was. To deny any German side is ludicrous.
Cornelius
14 Oct 2011 #38
Poland was partitioned for what, 250 years? They weren't a nation until approximately 1920 so of course scientific research doesn't go on in such an environment. In order to have research you have to have political stability.

Yet Jews did just fine during that time.
boletus 30 | 1,366
14 Oct 2011 #39
Cornelius

Yet Jews did just fine during that time.

And you are wrong again.

Ever heard about famous Polish Polish School of Mathematics and Logic during interbellum?
Then take a look at its Polish/Jews distribution.
Lwów School of Mathematics:
Banach, Mazur, Orlicz, Barański, Saks, Karczmarz were Poles
Steinhaus, Ulam, Kac, Schauder, Auerbach were Polish Jews

Warsaw School of Mathematics:
Sierpiński, Kuratowicz, Janiszewski, Mazurkiewicz, Borsuk, Marczewski, Knaster, Sikorski - Poles
Aronszajn, Eilenberg - Polish Jews

Lwów-Warsaw School of Logic:
Twardowski, Leśniewski, £ukasiewicz, Mostowski - Poles.
Tarski, Lindenbaum - Polish Jews

So stop trolling..
polmed 1 | 216
14 Oct 2011 #40
Copernicus was not fully Polish and nobody can claim he was. To deny any German side is ludicrous.

So stupid !!!!!!!! Better claim he was a woman
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,849
14 Oct 2011 #41
Better claim he was a woman

She was, silly.
boletus 30 | 1,366
15 Oct 2011 #42
Jan Czochralski (1885-1953), studied metal chemistry in Berlin, later moved back to Poland in 1928 and became Professor of Metallurgy and Metal Research at the Chemistry Department of the Warsaw University of Technology. He discovered "Czochralski method" of crystallization of single crystals of lead, zinc, and tin that were a millimeter in diameter and up to 150 centimeters long. The method was rediscovered in 1950 by Bell Labs to grow single germanium crystals, which began its use in producing suitable semiconductors.

The most common technique used for growing crystals for the development of wafers is the Czochralski growth. There are other methods of growing crystals but the Cz is most common. The material used in growing a single crystal silicon ingot is electronic grade silicon(EGS), which is refined from MGS and must have 99.999999999% purity.

people.seas.harvard.edu/~jones/es154/lectures/lecture_2/materials/materials.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Czochralski
isthatu2 4 | 2,703
15 Oct 2011 #43
Bronislaw wottits, the guy from the 70s TV show and the book every middle class and a hell of a lot of working class homes in Britain had a copy of..........come on,some one fill the name in for me :)

EDIT
er.... Jacob Bronowski.... The Ascent of Man;

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ascent_of_Man
modafinil - | 418
15 Oct 2011 #44
Jacob Bronowski.... The Ascent of Man;

According to this thread Jews don't count...well, separately listed. I got the dvd set, I'm sure there was a scene where he visited Auschwitz and tearfully walked barefooted through the ash-bog. If he was plain Polish he would have said 'Hey, nothing to do with us, it was those Germans', while shaking a fist in whichever direction Germany lay.
boletus 30 | 1,366
15 Oct 2011 #45
If he was plain Polish he would have said 'Hey, nothing to do with us, it was those Germans', while shaking a fist in whichever direction Germany lay.

This thread was started by a troll and is visited by some trolls, who insist that native Poles gave no contribution to world science, and if they did then they must have been of Jewish origin. Which is not entirely true. Now you are off topic, modafinil, with your comment here. So let me remind you that "others deported to Auschwitz included 150,000 Poles, 23,000 Roma and Sinti, 15,000 Soviet prisoners of war, some 400 Jehovah's Witnesses and tens of thousands of people of diverse nationalities." Or whatever, I just quoted wikipedia. Thus your comment was not called for.

My great uncle perished in Buchenwald, presumably of typhus(*). And he was only a young boy, just a Pole. My great grandmother miraculously survived five and half years of Ravensbruck. Luckily she was not selected as one of those "medical rabbits" for experiments with gangrene bacteria, etc. And she was only a Polish teacher. So I expect from you the same kind of respect as you expect it from me.

(*)The camp was also a site of large-scale trials for vaccines against epidemic typhus in 1942 and 1943. In all 729 inmates were used as test subjects, of whom 154 died.

So now back on topic, attempting to fight away standard trolls.
Polish inventors

Stefan Drzewiecki (1844-1938): invented cab odometer, precise plotter of ship routes, worked on propeller-driven (1-4 men) submarines, invented precise method for manufacturing ship and plane propellers, developed theory of gliding.

Józef Stanisław Kosacki (1909–1990): Polish professor engineer, inventor, and an officer in the Polish Army during World War II. He is best known as the inventor of the Polish mine detector, the first man-portable mine detector, whose basic design has been in use with various armies for over 50 years.

Stefan Kudelski (1929-) is a Polish audio engineer, famous for creating the Nagra series of professional audio recorders. The company is still going fine.

Jan Józef Ignacy £ukasiewicz (1822–1882) was a Polish pharmacist and petroleum industry pioneer who in 1856 built the first oil refinery in the world. Among his other achievements were the discovery of how to distill kerosene from seep oil, the invention of the modern kerosene lamp (1853), the introduction of the first modern street lamp in Europe (1853), and the construction of the first oil well in Poland (1854).

Henryk Władysław Magnuski (1909 -1978) was a Polish telecommunications engineer who worked for Motorola in Chicago. He was the inventor of one of the first Walkie-Talkies and one of the authors of his company success in the fields of radio communication.

Kazimierz Prószyński (1875 - 1945). He patented his first film camera, called Pleograph, before the Lumière brothers, and later went on to improve the cinema projector for the Gaumont company, as well as invent the widely used hand-held Aeroscope camera, powered by compressed air. Hundreds of light and relatively compact Aeroscope cameras were used by British Army combat cameramen on the battlefields of World War I and later by newsreel cameramen until the late 1920s, when more modern spring cameras like Eyemo and later Bolex took over.

Zygmunt Puławski (1901 - 1931) was a Polish aircraft designer and pilot. He invented a gull-wing aircraft design, also known as "Puławski wing" and constructed a series of Polish PZL fighters

Michał Sędziwój (Michael Sendivogius, Sędzimir) (1566–1636) was a Polish alchemist, philosopher, and medical doctor. A pioneer of chemistry, he developed ways of purification and creation of various acids, metals and other chemical compounds. He discovered that air is not a single substance and contains a life-giving substance-later called oxygen -- 170 years before Scheele and Priestley. He correctly identified this 'food of life' with the gas (also oxygen) given off by heating nitre (saltpetre).

Jan Szczepanik (1872-1926) made over 50 discoveries, many of which are still used today, especially in the motion picture industry, photography, and television.
modafinil - | 418
15 Oct 2011 #46
Boletus, Yes the second part of my post was callous and irrelevant. I knew he was Jewish by other deductions.
(he wasn't actually barefoot)

Anyway, I mention Prof. Włodzimierz Koskowski to add a British slant and regard humane human pharmacological experiment. He had Chairs in Lwów, Edinborough and Paris served and twice decorated in WW1 born in Poland and died in Wales where he semi-retired to work as a GP.

His many key contributions here -

swindonbackgarden.wordpress.com/zzzzing-on-the-lawn/professor-wlodzimierz-koskowski-leading-polish-researcher-and-swindon/

Part of the text of the eulogy given by Professor of Nueroscience Colin Blakemore, Oxford Univeristy, at the celebration of Włodzimierz Koskowski's life, at the Swindon Polish Centre, May 2011 -

The decades after the First World War were an exciting period in research on pharmacology - the chemistry of bodily processes and of the action of drugs. Poland was strong in its contribution to medical research in general and to pharmacology in particular. The young Dr Koskowski, clearly influenced by that tradition (and, no doubt, by his father), was attracted to the burgeoning field of pharmacology. Even while he was serving as an Army doctor in the Polish campaign, he was still actively conducting his research at the University of Lwów. At that stage, he was fascinated with the control of the heart and the influence of natural bodily chemicals and drugs on heart function and on blood pressure.

alphagalileo.org/AssetViewer.aspx?AssetId=49634&CultureCode=en - Obituary Koskowski

^BMJ Obituary from 1965^
padfan - | 2
15 Oct 2011 #47
Just go Wikipedia // List of Polish people and you will have a sample of what Poles contributed to science and other realms of knowledge.

No further comment because I would have to offend seriously the author of the question....
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
15 Oct 2011 #48
Hillary Koprowski and the Polio Vaccine.
patrick 6 | 113
15 Oct 2011 #49
Consider this.

When I worked at a Polish university, I saw professors working in one or two other places besides their original place and earning lots of money. What do you think life is like in Poland for lecturers? THEY work two or three jobs just to keep the family fed and the lights on. Don't look to me for sympathy for those poor Polish professors.
MediaWatch 10 | 945
15 Oct 2011 #51
However, in modern times it seems Poles are lagging behind in fields such as astronomy, biology, chemistry, and physics.

There is a tendancy among some people to think that just about any great invention was from somebody who was Jewish.

According to some people, famous inventors like the Wright brothers, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford were Jewish. Sorry they were not.

I doubt Polish Jews got all these Nobel prizes. But if they did, it was because they lived in Poland which gave them all their opportunities to be the best that they could be, which they did not get in most other countries. This is why most Jews CHOSE to live in Poland for ONE THOUSAND YEARS.

As for people of Polish ancestry, the co-founder of the great company Apple Computer, which has revolutionized the world with its technology, is of Polish ancestry.

Enough said.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Oct 2011 #53
Ah, Ludwig :) The oculist :) He had a great idea which didn't quite come off but it had a lot of potential.
polmed 1 | 216
15 Oct 2011 #54
Most of you who are not Polish - why do you post here if you hate Poland so much . Go to your ethnic forums and spread news about your country men . Why are you infesting this forum ?
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
15 Oct 2011 #55
hate

You should check out the difference between hating and being objective. It seems you have a problem with objectivity, Moania...
isthatu2 4 | 2,703
15 Oct 2011 #56
According to this thread Jews don't count...well, separately listed.

My bad,sorry, just not used here in the savage west to sub dividing people into their religions......
patrick 6 | 113
15 Oct 2011 #57
Most of you who are not Polish - why do you post here if you hate Poland so much .

There's definitely an edge to a lot of the comments on this forum, mine included. I lived and worked in Poland for eight years, and was often times frustrated there. Sometimes I have to remind myself of all the nice things that I experienced there.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
15 Oct 2011 #58
I see OP is not up on current events he just cast his Trolling net again as usual which is typical for a Jew on this Forum. Just last year an International Eureka Contest was held in Brussels, it showcased more than 20 countries, some 150 participants and more than 400 inventions in diverse areas to present their patented inventions and new ideas. Poland took 107 awards leaving all other participants in the dust so to speak. Funny though, I don’t recall any representatives of Israel there, Not fu**** One.

EDIT To OP: For all the interest you show in innovations you keep reading wrong material, Daily Mail will never get you up to speed.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,849
15 Oct 2011 #59
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_Cipher_Bureau
Does this count as science?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Oct 2011 #60
which is typical for a Jew on this Forum

Jew-envy again, have we?

Poland took 107 awards leaving all other participants in the dust so to speak.

Link or it didn't happen.


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