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No Nazi puppet regime in Poland?


OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
1 Oct 2010 #31
For those interested, here is a list of the Nazis' 'Polish' collaborators:
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kategoria:Polscy_kolaboranci_III_Rzeszy

In english: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Polish_collaborators_with_Nazi_Germany
nott 3 | 594
1 Oct 2010 #32
here is a list of the Nazis' 'Polish' collaborators:

all 20 of them... :))
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 12,345
1 Oct 2010 #33
Problem is if they really count as collaborateurs in the common sense.

...
The history of Poles in the Wehrmacht, the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany, began with the German invasion of Poland in 1939. More than 400,000 citizens of the Polish Second Republic served in the Wehrmacht,[1] and not many in Kriegsmarine and Waffen SS. The majority of these Polish citizens were Poles of German extraction (Volksdeutsche), Silesians, Kasubians, and Masurians. Some of other Polish citizens of Ukrainian, Belarusian, Russian, and Lithuanian origin serve in German military units, both in Wehrmacht and the Waffen SS.

Of course they supported the enemy of the nation they were citizens of but patriotic Poles did the same during the partitions, fighting against Prussia for France for example.

If those non-ethnical polish citizens felt allegiance to Germany I don't think it can be seen as collaboration or betrayal...IMHO....or what do Poles think?
nott 3 | 594
1 Oct 2010 #34
I think... could be seen as betrayal, as they were Polish citizens. But in a rather legalistic sense.

Collaboration is reserved for doubtless Poles.

And I still have that question of Volksliste III in Silesia. I heard, from witnesses, that Silesians were 'enlisted' automatically. You are positive about that absolutely voluntary thing?
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 12,345
1 Oct 2010 #35
Yes, as there was no automatically enlisting.

In the beginning 39/40/41 it might even have been quite hard to get onto the Liste I, you had to show papers and stuff.
But in the end they took really everybody...here also some not so voluntarily "recruiting" surely happend.

Not to mention that Silesia itself was splitted, the upper part with a majority of Poles and the lower part with a majoritiy of Germans...to treat Silesia as one just wouldn't had made much sense.

ID of a polish Volksdeutscher
nott 3 | 594
1 Oct 2010 #36
here also some not so voluntarily "recruiting" surely happend.

could be this. And there is some info of Silesians deserting from Wehrmacht, so like independent confirmation.

Not to mention that Silesia itself was splitted, the upper part with a majority of Poles and the lower part with a majoritiy of Germans...to treat Silesia as one just wouldn't had made much sense.

Right. I was speaking about Upper Silesia.

Edit:

Szczepaniak from Kattowitz-Sud... I am from there :)
Torq
1 Oct 2010 #38
Szczepaniak from Kattowitz-Sud

How could Germans put a fellow named Szczepaniak on a Deutsche volksliste is beyond me!

I can only imagine the pain of the German office clerk who had to write it to prepare the ausweis :)
...
nott 3 | 594
1 Oct 2010 #39
How could Germans put a fellow named Szczepaniak on a Deutsche volskliste is beyond me!

But see the first name: Franz. Full-blooded German, innit :)

Frantzischek. Sounds German enough to me. Or Czech...
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 12,345
1 Oct 2010 #40
How could Germans put a fellow named Szczepaniak on a Deutsche volksliste is beyond me!

Oh god thank you for this link Torqi...I searched for it for awhile now...always good for a laugh!
Torq
1 Oct 2010 #41
Franz. Full-blooded German, innit :)

Sure. Just like Franz Smuda ;)

Oh god thank you for this link Torqi...I searched for it for awhile now...always good for
a laugh!

Yes - an oldskool Polish comedy. I watched it about a hundred times when I was a kid :)
pawian 200 | 21,529
1 Oct 2010 #42
was there ever such an option?

To the best of my knowledge, there wasn`t.
Hitler never thought of creating a Polish puppet regime.

If he had tried, there would have been volunteers from pre-war Polish fascist parties.
nott 3 | 594
1 Oct 2010 #43

:) you may not know it, but Brunner had quite a crowd of fans in Poland. If you know what I mean :)

edit:

If he had tried, there would have been volunteers from pre-war Polish fascist parties.

Not quite sure. Fascist meant nationalistic, not pro-Hitler. Like ONR.
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 12,345
1 Oct 2010 #44
Fascist meant nationalistic, not pro-Hitler. Like ONR.

Fascists in Spain, in Holland, in France in GB and even as far as the USA etc. had been fans of Hitler...they took his national-socialism as ideal for their countries too...it was really a widespread alliance.

/wiki/Fascism

They were nationalists first but in following Hitler and in helping to make Nazi-Germany victorious
they hoped to be victorious at home too.
European and american Fascists saw Hitler as their best bet.
nott 3 | 594
1 Oct 2010 #45
Fascists in Spain, in Holland, in France in GB and even as far as the USA etc. had been fans of Hitler...

But Poles are, you know, different :) I mean, German aircraft didn't shoot at refugees on the roads of Spain, Holland, etc.


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