The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered [6]  |  Archives [1] 
 
Witamy, Guest  |  Members
Home / History   31

German history of my new home in Poland



abaper 1 | 2    
18 Nov 2016  #1

I recently become a happy owner of a house on Polish Pomerania. I love the house architecture and the place it's settled. I would love to know about the history of the house. I've got one small photo made in 1930's and as I'm going to remodel the house, would be great to reference original style. Maybe there are some successors of the previous owners could share some history.

Where would you start with no German language knowledge?


Atch 13 | 1,844    
18 Nov 2016  #2

Do you know when the house was built? That's your starting point. If you have the rough date you can read up on the history of how it should look inside and out, if you want it have some authentic features.
Atch 13 | 1,844    
18 Nov 2016  #3

If the house has substantial German influence you can find information on the net about German houses. If your house is a farm house for example, lots of images here of authentic interiors which you could adapt for modern purposes:

maggieblanck.com/Germany/HousesIn.html

You can also get a good idea of the kind of furniture etc to choose. I can see that there are several 1930s pieces in the rooms alongside much older pieces.

Here's a link from the same site showing exteriors, can you spot anything like your house?

maggieblanck.com/Germany/Exteriors.html
Ziemowit 8 | 2,636    
18 Nov 2016  #4

happy owner of a house on Polish Pomerania.

Do you know when the house was built?

If the house has substantial German influence

The term 'Polish Pomerania' is amiguous. In Germany the terms they used for 'Pomerania' were "Vorpommern" and "Hinterpommern". What is now 'Województwo pomorskie" in Poland which may be what you have referred to as 'Polish Pomerania' was for major part "Westpreussen" for the Germans. The term 'Polish Pomerania' was never really used in history. The Poles simply called it "Pomorze" between 1920 and 1939.
Crow 137 | 5,906    
18 Nov 2016  #5

What German history? Are you deluded? Germans are Serbians who tragically mistaken under the pressure and I sincerely apologize to Poles for all the sh** that Germans done to them.
Atch 13 | 1,844    
18 Nov 2016  #6

The term 'Polish Pomerania' was never really used in history.

Perhaps the OP is American? They do tend to use their own terms for Polish things. I really don't like to hear Germanic or Anglicized forms of Polish place names. For example, I hate hearing Silesia for Śląsk or Masovia for Mazowieckie. But the worst is when Americans translate Polish street names into English such as referring to Ulica Piękna as Beautiful Street. Would they call the Champs-Élysées the Elysian Fields? No, they wouldn't so why do they take liberties with Polish names. Having said that I am guilty of calling Warszawa, Warsaw :))
Ironside 46 | 8,406    
18 Nov 2016  #7

Polish Pomerania

What Polish Pomerania?
TheOther 5 | 3,017    
18 Nov 2016  #8

Where would you start with no German language knowledge?

Go to the nearest District Court (Sąd Rejonowy?) and try to obtain copies of the old pre WW2 land records. They will tell you the history of the house and its previous owners. You'll have to be very lucky though since many of these documents were deliberately destroyed by the Soviets and the Polish commies right after the war.
smurf 39 | 1,997    
18 Nov 2016  #9

I hate hearing Silesia for Śląsk or Masovia for Mazowieckie

Really?

But sure Atch with that logic you'd never call Dublin Dublin, it's be Atha Cliath and Wexford would be Loch Garman etc.

I call it Silesia and any Silesians I speak to about Silesia call it Silesia too...there's even sports teams down here that use Silesia instead of Slask, I don't think it's a big deal for Poles to use the different versions...anyway Sileisa is more likey the German name that then English one and Silesia was German for a long, long time
OP abaper 1 | 2    
18 Nov 2016  #10

Ironside middle of zachodniopomorskie
Ziemowit 8 | 2,636    
18 Nov 2016  #11

Perhaps the OP is American?

Perhaps. I wonder why the OP wrote "owner of a house on Polish Pomerania". Do they say "owner of a house on California" in the US?

anyway Sileisa is more likey the German name that then English one

Silesia is not the German name. The German name is "Schlesien".

and Silesia was German for a long, long time

Only for slightly more than two hundred years (1741-1945), Mr I Know What You Don't Know.
smurf 39 | 1,997    
18 Nov 2016  #12

Only for slightly more than two hundred years

Actually:

After World War I, Upper Silesia was contested by Germany and the newly independent Second Polish Republic. The League of Nations organized a plebiscite to decide the issue in 1921.

It resulted in 60% of votes being cast for Germany and 40% for Poland. Following the third Silesian Uprising (1921), however, the easternmost portion of Upper Silesia (including Katowice), with a majority ethnic Polish population, was awarded to Poland, becoming the Silesian Voivodeship.

From here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silesia#History

It's it funny that after a democratic referendum where the people decided to remain part of Germany it was instead awarded to Poland. Funny that eh?

Oh those pesky League of Nations guys and their meddalling in world affairs. Just imagine a successful Silesia powering Germany in modern times, instead we have sh!tholes like Ruda Slask and Bytom, Chorzow and Myslowice

So, anyway from 1741 to 1921 it was German; 180 years.
It's been Polish since 1921; 95 years.
Pretty easy to see that it was German for longer, let's not bother counting pre-1741 becasue Poland wasn't a republic then and freedom wasn't really afforded to the common people.

Now, let's go back to ignoring each other, I think you're a flaming galah and you think I'm one too so please let's never speak again, it was so much better that way
dolnoslask 2 | 1,173    
18 Nov 2016  #13

we have sh!tholes like Ruda Slask and Bytom, Chorzow and Myslowice

Sadly a result of 60 years of Soviet occupation and oppression, but mindsets and the economy is improving.
Ironside 46 | 8,406    
18 Nov 2016  #14

Ironside middle of zachodniopomorskie

Ah, OK, thanks.
-----------------------

Silesia was German for a long, long time

Not that long.
-----------------------

So, anyway from 1741 to 1921 it was German; 180 years.

Wow Mr Genius in action again. From 1741 to 1871 belonged to Prussia. From 1871 belonged to the German empire hardly a democratic republic but I let it slide.

Not 180 years but 70 years when it comes to whole Silesia and when it comes to the upper Silesia you're talking about only
50 yearswhereas the same upper Silesia belonged to Poland as you noticed for at least95 years.
That is about as much as an Independent Ireland exist. Maybe should be merged with Britain again after all what is 95 years to a few hundred years, eh?

---------------------------

It's it funny that after a democratic referendum where the people decided to remain part of Germany it was instead awarded to Poland. Funny that eh?

You might have no heard about three Silesian uprisings which point out at the popular sentiment of people that wanted to be part of Poland. Also that 60% of referendum pertain to the whole upper Silesia but in 1922 that country has been spilt along lines of pro-Poland pro-German vote, some counties went to Poland and some remained in Germany.

----------------------------------------------------------------

Pretty easy to see that it was German for longer

No it wasn't. Pretty easy to spot an ignorant .....!
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Just imagine a successful Silesia powering Germany

Why don't move to Germany, eh?
------------------------------------------------

let's not bother counting pre-1741 becasue Poland wasn't a republic then and freedom wasn't really afforded to the common people.

Poland was a republic back then and was more free than any other country in the world. Geez ....you don't need a mule you can ride your own ignorance.

--------------------------------

You'll have to be very lucky though since many of these documents were deliberately destroyed by the Soviets and the Polish commies right after the war.

Who told you that BS? Most papers where taken by the Nazi German official when they were running west from the Soviets. If you have any evidence that such a destruction happened I would like to see it as I'm not familiar with it.
mafketis 16 | 4,837    
18 Nov 2016  #15

Sadly a result of 60 years of Soviet occupation and oppression

How do get 60 years?
Ironside 46 | 8,406    
18 Nov 2016  #16

That would be 44 years or 46 years. Depends how you're counting it. I would say 46.
Atch 13 | 1,844    
18 Nov 2016  #17

Dublin Dublin, it's be Atha Cliath

Dubhlinn Smurf, remember? The other Irish name for Dublin which is the Anglicized form of it, thanks to the Brits not being able to pronounce the original, easy though it is. The thing is that Irish place names in their English form are often just a corruption of the Gaelic because of the Brits not being able to get their heads around Irish, and some are direct translations from the Irish like Greystones, na Clocha Liath, so it's not so bad I think. Interesting point you made though!
TheOther 5 | 3,017    
18 Nov 2016  #18

Who told you that...?

A Polish district court, Iron. Most newer land deed records were worthless because they were only held for 50 years anyway unless there was a mortgage/ loan or something on the property. Politically motivated destruction of these records took place in both the "Recovered Territories" as well as in areas of Poland where ethnic Germans had stayed behind after the country regained its independence. The Russians did the same in East Prussia.

Most papers where taken by the Nazi German official when they were running west from the Soviets

That's a myth. The Nazis didn't care too much about these documents for the above mentioned reasons. They even left most vital records behind, which were much more valuable.
Lyzko 17 | 3,676    
18 Nov 2016  #19

Older Germans still often refer to 'Vor- u. Hinterpommern' when referring even casually to post-War Pomerania:-) To many, it remains German.
dolnoslask 2 | 1,173    
18 Nov 2016  #20

How do get 60 years?

Depends if you take into account the transition period , so i might be 8 years wrong, stop being a argumentative little sod and contribute to the thread.
TheOther 5 | 3,017    
18 Nov 2016  #21

@ Iron

Forgot to say: most documents that have survived the war are now in Polish state archives. Some of them get published online, others require a visit, and many are still inaccesible to the public.
Observvver    
18 Nov 2016  #22

> I really don't like to hear Germanic or Anglicized forms of Polish place names.
>For example, I hate hearing Silesia for Śląsk or Masovia for Mazowieckie.

Well you wouldn't expect Poles to say 'London' instead of 'Londyn' when writing in Polish, would you? And don't tell me that you really say 'Roma' for Rome, Espana for Spain or use some Inuit word for Greenland? Macro-geographical names (regions, major cities, countries) always have a national form in each country. You'd only use the local name when it's too obscure to have made it into your own language.

And you'd have to Anglisize Śląsk anyway, bearing in mind the small matter that two of those letters don't exist in English...
smurf 39 | 1,997    
19 Nov 2016  #23

Not

That's where I stopped reading, go get in the sea.

Join Ziem and don't bother posting to me coz I don't read it

and some are direct translations from the Irish like Greystones, na Clocha Liath

Where I'm from the Irish translates as 'sleeping rock' into English but the English name is just a mess :P
Ziemowit 8 | 2,636    
20 Nov 2016  #24

It's been Polish since 1921; 95 years.

A - 345 years; Silesia is Polish since 990 until 1335 when Casimir III Great was forced to relinquish his claims to Silesia in the Treaty of Trentschin.

B - 191 years; Silesia is Czech since 1335 until 1526.
C - 215 years; Silesia is Austrian since1526 until 1741
D - 204 years; Silesia is Prussian and German since 1741 until 1945

Now, let's go back to ignoring each other

please let's never speak again

Schade, wirklich schade, mein lieber Smurf!
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

casmir

Poland (red) at the end of the reign of Kazimierz III (1370); Silesia (yellow) had been lost, but the Kingdom was expanding to the east
Wincig 2 | 148    
20 Nov 2016  #25

A - 345 years; Silesia is Polish since 990 until 1335 when ...

I do admire your precision Ziemowit; but then where was Silesia before 990??
DominicB - | 2,410    
20 Nov 2016  #26

@Wincig
From 935 to 990: Bohemia (loosely under the Holy Roman empire from 955 on.

From 902 to 935: Anarchy after Magyar raids devastated the area.

From sometime in the mid 800's to 902: Greater Moravia

From about 600 to the mid 800's: Several West Slavic tribes

From about 400 to 600: essentially depopulated after Hun raids drove the inhabitants away.

About 100 to 400: Germanic tribes, Goths and Vandals, including (probably) the Silingi, who apparently took their name from the hill just south of Wrocław.

500 BC to 100: Celtic tribes.

3000 BC to 500 BC: Indo-European tribes (proto-Germans and Proto-Celts, possibly Proto-Balto-Slavs mixed in).

4500 BC to 3000: Danubian Neolithic farmers (non-Indo-European, probably originally from Anatolia in Turkey).

9000 BC to 4500 BC: Scattered Mesolithic hunter gatherers.

Before 10000 BC: up to 2000 meters of ice covered virtually all of Silesia.
Crow 137 | 5,906    
20 Nov 2016  #27

No German history. Its just history of delusion.
Wincig 2 | 148    
20 Nov 2016  #28

@DominicB
Thanks Dominic!
Crow 137 | 5,906    
20 Nov 2016  #29

Before 10000 BC: up to 2000 meters of ice covered virtually all of Silesia.

Yes and back in those times ancestors of future Silesians lived in Balkan Ice age refugium and were Serbians (ie Sarmatians).
mafketis 16 | 4,837    
20 Nov 2016  #30

future Silesians lived in Balkan Ice age refugium and were Serbians (ie Sarmatians).

Is this a new hypothesis on the origin of humanity? The "Out of Serbia" hypothesis?




Home / History / German history of my new home in Poland
Click this icon to move up back to the quoted message. Bold Italic [quote]

 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary and unique username or login and post as a member.