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In WW2 Poland who was eligible to sign the Volksliste ?


TheOther 5 | 3,682
20 Jul 2012 #31
As I tried to explain before: your ancestor was a so-called "Schutzangehoeriger" - a citizen of an annexed territory who was neither considered a foreigner nor a German. Such people were usually put in either category 3 or 4, unless they were Jewish. Since you've said that some of your ancestors considered themselves Prussian-Germans, my assumption is that a German female from that side of your family married a Polish man with the surname Mackowiak. If this is true, Thadeus should have been in Category III of the Volkliste. For details, see #24 above.

HTH
OP Slavicaleks 8 | 98
20 Jul 2012 #32
thanks for that :)

if you only had 1 German grandparent and 3 Polish grandparents could you be on the volkliste?
TheOther 5 | 3,682
20 Jul 2012 #33
Well, he was listed as Schutzangehoeriger, so he was in the Volksliste, right? Maybe even in Category IV - Persons of Polish nationality considered "racially valuable", but who resisted Germanization (see #15).
OP Slavicaleks 8 | 98
20 Jul 2012 #34
yes thats true. i am thinking volkliste 3 because they volunteered.

I know for a fact his fathers mother was German.

I'm just trying to figure out what his mother was. Fully Polish or mixed Polish-German also.
All I know is she went to Germany with her kids. Both her first name and surname were also Polish.
TheOther 5 | 3,682
20 Jul 2012 #35
All I know is she went to Germany with her kids.

Before, during or after the war? Before the war and the family might have been on the so-called Optantenliste of 1920/2 (a list of people wanting to leave Poland for Germany, and vice versa). During the war and she might have been a slave laborer who was considered "racially valuable" (Category IV of the Volksliste). After the war and she was probably expelled by the Poles because she had been on the Volksliste.
OP Slavicaleks 8 | 98
20 Jul 2012 #36
During the first couple of months of the war she was living a normal life on the farm with her (husbands) family in Warthegau.

When she found out her husband died on the Russian front (he was a lieutenant in the German army) she voluntarily left for Germany (Reich).
TheOther 5 | 3,682
20 Jul 2012 #37
I'm not sure here, but I don't think it was possible for members of Volksliste Category 3 or 4 to move freely in the occupied territories or the Reich. Which means that they either allowed her to relocate because her children had a German father, or she herself had German ancestors. That's a wild guess, though.
OP Slavicaleks 8 | 98
20 Jul 2012 #38
I definitely know that her husband had a German mother.

Would having 1 German grandparent allow you to be on the volkliste ? or is more needed?
OP Slavicaleks 8 | 98
20 Jul 2012 #40
I am guessing she also has at least a German mother

because the most important thing is they all volunteered '' free will''
TheOther 5 | 3,682
20 Jul 2012 #41
I am guessing she also has at least a German mother

Why do you guess? Most relevant churchbooks of the Warthegau area should be available online either at the LDS or one of the Polish state archives, so you could easily check for yourself. Start with the marriage records and go from there.
OP Slavicaleks 8 | 98
20 Jul 2012 #42
I have no idea how to. I am not good with a computer and I can not read Polish
TheOther 5 | 3,682
20 Jul 2012 #43
If you want to research your family tree, you'll have to learn...

familysearch.org/search/records/index#count=20&query=%2Bgivenn ame%3AThadeus~%20%2Bsurname%3AMackowiak~
wbc.poznan.pl/dlibra
poznan-project.psnc.pl

Good luck.
OP Slavicaleks 8 | 98
20 Jul 2012 #44
thank you.

Is this just for Americans? I am Australian
Rautendorf1943
28 Apr 2019 #46
I was born in Poland in 1943 near Poznan. Father was ethnic German with German surname born in Poland. Mother was ethnic pole born in east end of Poland. Father was conscripted to serve in German army on western front. Following invasion of Poland in 1939, family signed on to the Volksliste. I am curious to know which classification they would have had. How can someone find any of these documents in the Polish archives?
terri 1 | 1,665
29 Apr 2019 #47
I gather from the document that the nationality was 'Pole' and beruf/profession was a 'farmer/farming hand. Many people who lived in the Kaszuby region had German ancestry.
Miloslaw 9 | 2,899
29 Apr 2019 #48
I had a Polish uncle who was conscripted to the German army because one of his grandmothers was ethnically German.....the rest of his grandparents were Polish.


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