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Poland is a Catholic country


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
29 May 2013  #1
Poland is a Catholic country which does not mean every single citizen is Catholic. But its history, culture, tradition and lifestyles are permeated with Catholic substance. In some countries Chrsitmas is just one big Bacchic booze-up and pig-out with some presetns thrown in. In Poland the Yule celebrations are permaetd with Catholic substance. Even the food, number of dishes, time, table setting and related activities are all rooted in the nation's Catholic heritage. Poland's national motto is Bóg, Honor Ojczyzna. Poland is one of the few countries that celebrates the feastdays of one patron's saint: imieniny. Baptism, First Holy Communion and Confirmation as well as church wedding ceremonies are the norm for most Poles.

Yes, there are a few belonging to certain sects: Jehovites, Lutherans, etc., but it is Catholicism that sets the tone.
Poland's 500,000 Eastern Orthodox believers also have Apostolic Succession and theologically can effectively be regarded as a branch of the one true Church, albeit under separate jurisdiction.

re

Ger. itian" denominatio ns

re still the norm.
legend 3 | 664
29 May 2013  #2
Agreed and well said. I dont mind Orthodox Christians either. There are small amounts of decent Protestants too, but many of them are brainwashed to be antiCatholic.
Harry
29 May 2013  #3
Poland is a Catholic country

Poland is a secular state. Read the constitution sometime.

still the norm.

Surely those can't be your own words.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,626
29 May 2013  #4
As much as you're obviously trolling, Polonius, I'll bite.

Poland is a Catholic country

No, it isn't. Read the Constitution - how many mentions of Catholicism can you find?
Polson 5 | 1,771
29 May 2013  #5
Apparently, yes, most Poles are Catholics. But what is your point, Polonius?

In some countries Chrsitmas is just one big Bacchic booze-up and pig-out with some presetns thrown in.

Where? Many people celebrate Christmas because it's a nice occasion to meet and enjoy some time with family, but it doesn't HAVE to be Catholic.

I mean, my Christmas were always very nice, I loved the atmosphere, the food, and everything, but it had very little to do with religion.

as well as church wedding ceremonies are the norm for most Poles.

You didn't mention the fact that more and more young Poles don't want to get married, and also the increasing number of divorces ;)

Anyway, officially, Poland is a secular state, which means that, 'officially', the Church cannot interfere in the state issues and politics.
But of course, Polish culture was very influenced by Catholicism, and many people today are still quite 'religious'.
Foreigner4 12 | 1,769
29 May 2013  #6
Why anyone is even arguing this is not for me to say.
One can look at the number of people attending church on a regular basis here.

It may not be a law but if I had to describe the average Pole, I think the words "likely to be Catholic." just might be one of the descriptors I'd use.
Harry
29 May 2013  #7
One can look at the number of people attending church on a regular basis here.

Less than four in ten and falling every year as the older people die off.

The fact that you're resorting to ever more pathetic acts of trolling to get attention really makes one wonder about you.

Not as much as statements like this (made just after five in the afternoon, just a touch early really) make me wonder about him:

re

Ger. itian" denominatio ns

re still the norm.

legend 3 | 664
29 May 2013  #8
Of course Poland is officially secular, but what hes saying is that a large portion of people are Catholic. The religion plays a significant role in many peoples lives.

Look at the number of people attending church on a regular basis here. It may not be a law but if I had to describe the average Pole, I think the words "likely to be Catholic." just might be one of the descriptors I'd use.

Church audience is falling perhaps, but you dont need to go to Church weekly to be identified as a Catholic.
Even so Poland has one of the largest weekly church goers in Europe and still one of the more 'religious' countries in Europe.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
29 May 2013  #9
Tomrrow is Corpus Christi. Anyone who doubts they are in a very Catholic country needs only to look about. Not only the big central procession in Old Town but local ones at every single parish. But the nit-picking

Stooges will probably say something really profound like: 'Yes, but some people will go of grilling, cycling, picnicking, pub-crawling, etc.'
Harry
29 May 2013  #10
Not only the big central procession in Old Town but local ones at every single parish.

Strange that, given what Jesus had to say about people who pray in public to be seen by others. Perhaps the people who go on such parades don't want to get their reward from their father.
Polson 5 | 1,771
29 May 2013  #11
Tomrrow is Corpus Christi. Anyone who doubts they are in a very Catholic country needs only to look about.

This is traditions. My Polish teacher is not really a believer from what she told me, but she still goes to the church for Easter, because it's 'normal', it's the tradition.

Which doesn't mean that real Catholics are a minority in Poland, I wouldn't dare say that, but one has to be careful when just 'looking about'.
Harry
29 May 2013  #12
Which doesn't mean that real Catholics are a minority in Poland

Oh but they are a minority. Under 40% of Poles bother with church going and that number goes down every year.
legend 3 | 664
29 May 2013  #13
By "real" Catholics and the 40% figure you refer to weekly church goers?
sobieski 107 | 2,128
29 May 2013  #14
'Yes, but some people will go of grilling, cycling, picnicking, pub-crawling, etc.'

Most families will indeed spend this day tomorrow cycling, having a bbq in their działka, picknicking in the park, having a late breakfast..and if they are lucky having Friday off as well. Pub-crawling? You seem to have an obsession with going out....

And yes some will take part in some kind of procession to show how catholic they are.
Foreigner4 12 | 1,769
29 May 2013  #15
Of course Poland is officially secular, but what hes saying is that a large portion of people are Catholic. The religion plays a significant role in many peoples lives.

Exactly. Is this seriously up for debate?
Ironside 48 | 9,705
29 May 2013  #16
Poland is a Catholic Country, Soviet Poland is not. I wonder why many foreigners support the Soviet- Poland.
Harry
29 May 2013  #17
There's a curious statement. I have always heard that a lot more Poles went to church every week during communism than they do now. But then I wasn't here during the Soviet days, so I don't know for myself. Perhaps somebody who was here then can comment on it?
Polson 5 | 1,771
29 May 2013  #18
Poland is a Catholic Country, Soviet Poland is not. I wonder why many foreigners support the Soviet- Poland.

That's a funny logic, Iron ;)
Ironside 48 | 9,705
29 May 2013  #19
Just an observation, maybe I should add - foreigners on PF.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
29 May 2013  #20
Anyone with an ounce of sensitivity for what Polishness is all about is invariably moved by the Boże Ciało
celelebrations. Over the years people from all over -- US, Canada & Western Europe have expressed awe and admiration for what they have witnessed. The little girls strewing the way for the Blessed Sacrament with flower petals, the bielinki -- teenage girls in white robes bearing icons and feretories, the beauiful old hymns soaring heavenward, the haunting scent of incense and the jangle of altar bells. And many of the pirvate flats along the procession routes are decorated with holy pictrues and flowers. Of course, we all know there are those who may find the syphlitic tarts gawking out of the windows of Hamburg's St Pauli and other such venues to be culturally and aesthetically more pleasing. À chacun son goût!
Polson 5 | 1,771
29 May 2013  #21
Just an observation

Nope, that's a fallacious statement, no objective, logical observation ;)

The little girls strewing the way for the Blessed Sacrament with flower petals, the bielinki -- teenage girls in white robes

And the little girls (and boys) laughed at because they decided not to do it.
The power of traditions. As beautiful as they can be.

À chacun son goût!

Joli ;)
Ironside 48 | 9,705
29 May 2013  #22
Nope, that's a fallacious statement, no objective, logical observation ;)

nope, your statement is fallacious
Polson 5 | 1,771
30 May 2013  #23
Come on, you're not a kid from what I heard. We could play this little game, but we'll get bored soon.
If you know what a fallacy is, you probably know -I dare hope- you did one.
jkb - | 198
30 May 2013  #24
Poland is a Catholic Country, Soviet Poland is not. I wonder why many foreigners support the Soviet- Poland.

They support neither. I'd be happy to see a truly secular Poland in my lifetime.
Meathead 5 | 470
30 May 2013  #25
As a matter of law Poland is secular but Poland is culturally Roman Catholic. England, The United States are culturally Protestant.
jkb - | 198
30 May 2013  #26
Historically, Poland is Roman Catholic. By law, it's secular. Now it's time to start applying that law.
sobieski 107 | 2,128
30 May 2013  #27
Anyone with an ounce of sensitivity for what Polishness

The majority of Poles are glad they are having a day off - weather is brilliant today - and if they are lucky, a long weekend. And no more. Warsaw Old Town will be full of people enjoying a beer in the sunshine. £azienki and Wilanów will be equally full of people. They have to be PO :)

Here in Bielany there is not a single window putting pictures and flowers on display. Nor in Żoliborz...Maybe I am living in an atheistic enclave? Or maybe you are out of touch with everyday Poland?
jon357 63 | 14,122
30 May 2013  #28
syphlitic tarts gawking

What makes you think they're syphilitic? Experience?
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
30 May 2013  #29
we all know there are those who may find the syphlitic tarts gawking out of the windows of Hamburg's St Pauli and other such venues to be culturally and aesthetically more pleasing. À chacun son goût!

please Polonius,this is hardly an appropriate place to share your dark fantasies!
Ironside 48 | 9,705
30 May 2013  #30
Come on, you're not a kid from what I heard. We could play this little game, but we'll get bored soon.

Well, my thinking is not erroneous, my observation skills are fine so maybe you just do not understand what I mean by Soviet Poland.

he majority of Poles are glad they are having a day off - weather is brilliant today - and if they are lucky, a long weekend.

Are they working? No!

They support neither. I'd be happy to see a truly secular Poland in my lifetime.

At least they are fellow travelers.
That the problem with secular country - Catholics tended to see it as a tolerant country where everybody would be t equally while atheist are seeing it as a invitation to impose their ideology and to build society without religion.


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