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What British unit liberated Poland in 1945??


Ksysia 25 | 430
6 Dec 2009 #1
It's the second time, when I was giving blood, when an English paramedic told me that his Father was in the unit liberating Poland in 1945?? I am not aware of any British unit in Warsaw in 1945, not that I'm well versed in History.

I know about the Warsaw Concerto in 1944 (thank you Britain), but 1945? That's when the Soviets were doing the liberating...
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
6 Dec 2009 #2
I am not an historian, but neither have I ever heard of any British unit liberating Poland. The Russians also did not liberate it, they merely replaced the Nazi occupation with their own.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
6 Dec 2009 #3
Ask the guy next time, which 'Poland' had he on mind:
- the one with 'polar bears'
- or the one with windmills and tulips (:
Mr Grunwald 20 | 1,554
7 Dec 2009 #4
Good question

Although you should consider he maybe having some Russian or soviet ancestors! :)
polishcanuck 7 | 462
7 Dec 2009 #6
British unit in Warsaw in 1945

I doubt it. I don't think "uncle joe" would have allowed "evil capitalists" in poland in '45...
Bratwurst Boy 6 | 10,592
7 Dec 2009 #7
It's the second time, when I was giving blood, when an English paramedic told me that his Father....

What nationality was his father? We all assume it was english but...
OP Ksysia 25 | 430
7 Dec 2009 #8
he said English...
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
7 Dec 2009 #9
Our GIs made it only as far east as the River Elbe. To the east of there the Soviets held sway.
Borrka 37 | 594
7 Dec 2009 #10
The only more or less proven fact of allied troops' presence on today's Polish territory were general Patton's tanks seen in Swieradow April,1945 .

regioset.pl/mapkagif.php?x=121&y=618
According to prof.Lojek who investigated the local population of Swieradow, Patton's tanks were withdrew after two days because of Soviet political intervention.

However there are no reports on this "raid" in Patton's memories.

From April 17 Patton occupied western Czech Republic and probably south-western corner of Lower Silesia, acting against orders of Eisenhower. We can only guess what were his intentions. Without a doubt, he saw the possibility of liberating large areas before the Soviets would conduct them. Does he also considered the realization of his idea according to which "after the defeat of Hitler, it has to be deal with Stalin"? Well known for his aversion to the Soviets, but the most capable and most erratic of the American generals, he was close to establishing contact with the army, which he saw as an enemy rather than an ally. Was he close to provoke - conflict or major incident between the superpowers? Patton alone does not solve the riddle of this book, published a collection of his war experiences. In fact, however, it does not contain general structured memories. He did not manage to write it down, since in the autumn of 1945., near Mannheim, he had died in a mysterious car accident. Perhaps there are archives, and maybe also a credible reports that could shed more light on the Patton activities in the area of Świeradów Zdroj. Meanwhile, we are left to remember that one of the corners of our country was liberated in 1945 by the United States Army.

insomnia.pl/II_woj._światowa:_US_Army_w_1945r._na_Dolnym_Śląsku_-t573687.html
Harry
7 Dec 2009 #11
There were no units of British land forces in Poland at that time. There were a couple of case of British escaped POWs rejoining the fight against the Nazis (one took part in the Warsaw Uprising) but those were rare and in no way organised.
Mr Grunwald 20 | 1,554
7 Dec 2009 #12
Even Harry has it all right.
I wonder if Britts feel they liberated all Europe?!
Harry
7 Dec 2009 #13
Who knows? But I'm sure that very many Brits know that they provided a nice safe place for the King of Norway and his minions while Mr Quisling provided the most lasting of Norwegian contributions to WWII.
Steveramsfan 2 | 306
7 Dec 2009 #14
Father was in the unit liberating Poland in 1945

The Royal Air force flew some missions to Warsaw from Italy to parachute supplies to the Warsaw Uprising in August 1945. Maybe this is what he meant?

My Grandma's first boyfriend is burried in Krakow when his plane was shot down.
Borrka 37 | 594
7 Dec 2009 #15
to parachute supplies to the Warsaw Uprising in August 1945. Maybe this is what he meant?

It was August 1944. I mean the Uprising.
Steveramsfan 2 | 306
7 Dec 2009 #16
yes :) I know I have the book in front of me :)

It was the 1945 in the quote that made me write the wrong date I think.
time means 5 | 1,310
7 Dec 2009 #17
Mr Quisling provided the most lasting of Norwegian contributions to WWII

Mr grunwald owned BIG time by Harry :-)
szkotja2007 27 | 1,499
7 Dec 2009 #18
safe place for the King of Norway

Carbisdale Castle - the worlds best youth hostel
carbisdale.org/virtualtour.htm
Mr Grunwald 20 | 1,554
8 Dec 2009 #19
Who knows? But I'm sure that very many Brits know that they provided a nice safe place for the King of Norway and his minions while Mr Quisling provided the most lasting of Norwegian contributions to WWII.

yeah thanks to that moron traitor he "saved" the Norwegian nation no death camps or anything here.

Mr grunwald owned BIG time by Harry :-)

You think that I think that the Norwegian contribution was any but great except of the trade fleet then your very wrong.
We Norwegians were so great we hanged him later too, then suddenly some years later we thought ey wait a minute... aren't we hanging our own countrymen? STOP!!!

Humanistics twats

Carbisdale Castle - the worlds best youth hostel

You know his wife was in the British family
Harry
8 Dec 2009 #20
^ You are too modest! You had your SS legion and your two SS regiments and your two SS battalions to go with the most famous Norwegian leader.
OP Ksysia 25 | 430
8 Dec 2009 #21
well maybe his Dad was in some raid in Poland, that's possible. But it is a SECOND paramedic who tells me that... That would give a very high percentage of people to randomly meet and learn they were sons of heroes...

maybe there was an operation but is now forgotten for some reason?
Harry
8 Dec 2009 #22
maybe there was an operation but is now forgotten for some reason?

No there wasn't. The only formal British operations which took place in Poland in WWII were air missions (unlike WWI).
1jola 14 | 1,879
8 Dec 2009 #23
But it is a SECOND paramedic who tells me that...

Strange pick up line, but hey...

That reminds me of the French resistance cell in the Warsaw Ghetto...
enkidu 7 | 623
8 Dec 2009 #24
Do you still remember Polish heroes in Battle of Britain?
Well: untreaty.un.org/unts/1_60000/1/11/00000504.pdf

Aparently they count every piece of ammunition, every gallon of petrol, every spitfire and then - They charge Poland for this.
Harry
8 Dec 2009 #25
Aparently they count every piece of ammunition, every gallon of petrol, every spitfire and then - They charge Poland for this.

Yet another tired old lie. Perhaps you'd also like to tell us about how Poles weren't invited to the London victory.

But seeing as you can't even be truthful about the academic qualification which you hold, I suppose it's a bit much to expect you to be truthful about important things.
time means 5 | 1,310
8 Dec 2009 #26
You think that I think that the Norwegian contribution was any but great except of the trade fleet then your very wrong.

I was not thinking anything of the sort i was just pointing out that you got owned. Which you did BIG time.
OP Ksysia 25 | 430
8 Dec 2009 #27
Aparently they count every piece of ammunition, every gallon of petrol, every spitfire and then - They charge Poland for this.

I'm not sure why that upsets you, enkidu? there was an agreement signed between ours and theirs commands, that we pay for ourselves. you should be proud that we didn't take money.
Harry
8 Dec 2009 #28
you should be proud that we didn't take money.

Say what? Do you have any idea how much money the Polish government accepted from the British and American governments?!!
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
8 Dec 2009 #29
I'm not sure why that upsets you, enkidu?

That’s not upsetting anyone; it is simply stating the facts which many Brits are not aware of. Some posters here like Harry would like everyone to believe that the Brits sponsored everything and paid for the Poles. He keeps repeating over and over how Britain was in debt till 70’s because of that. Once in a while a reminder is in order.
Harry
8 Dec 2009 #30
Poland paid for very little of what it used: the vast majority of material was a gift from the UK and the USA.

And for the record, the UK was still paying back its loans for, among other things, the equipment given to Poles until 29 December 2006. Which means that not only was it paying off Poland's war debt, it was at the same time gifting Poland bucketloads of money via the EU. Just a little reminder for you.

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