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Polish-Hungarian border exchange?



gregy741 3 | 860    
19 Apr 2017  #31

wishes to REMAIN, she'd better spruce up her act:-)

you talk BS.
if those illegals have any problem,there is legal way to resolve it in EU court
since they dont have a case,they,you and EU can FOKoff


Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
19 Apr 2017  #32

There are degree, gregy:-)

After all, Hungary must respect certain laws and even if it's Hungary's right not to allow migrants into her country, perhaps the entire EU ought to convene as a body and ask itself how it can make Europe less attractive to undocumented foreigners, instead of more! If foreigners find it less desirable to settle in countries such as France, Germany, Austria, Hungary, Slovakia etc., perhaps the governments of Syria, Saudi Arabia etc. will be induced to build up their own economies and there will be greater employment for all at home rather than always aboad!

Worth considering anyway.
OP Fehervary 1 | 9    
19 Apr 2017  #33

@Lyzko
You know, the Euro is a suitable currency only for very strong economies like Germany or France, we don't need it yet. Besides the Eu has no legal rights to kick any of its members out.
Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
19 Apr 2017  #34

I concur roundly, Fehervary! Hungary though is no slouch when it comes to productivity, in fact, she had a stronger economy during the 90's when I was last there, than Poland:-)

Someday, I'm sure that the forint will go the way of the lira, franc, and deutschmark, taking her rightful place among the relics of a bygone era!
gregy741 3 | 860    
19 Apr 2017  #35

forint will live long after Euro death.am sure about it
Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
19 Apr 2017  #36

I'm not!

There'd have to be a pressingly cogent reason for a return to pre-Euro times. Don't think we're there as yet, much as I'm continually skeptical of PM May's Brexit strategy.
delphiandomine 57 | 15,334    
19 Apr 2017  #37

forint will live long after Euro death.am sure about it

Doubt it. Hungary has had huge problems with currencies throughout the 20th century, and there's no reason to believe that the forint will be any better.

Hungarian kroner = abandoned due to rampant inflation in 1927
Hungarian pengo = abandoned due to unbelievable hyperinflation in 1946
Hungarian forint = suffered huge losses in the early 1990's.

Orban himself is talking about Euro entry, and if the EU starts to tie cohesion funds to Euro membership, Hungary will be first in line to join.
Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
19 Apr 2017  #38

That's true, Delph.

I believe most countries which have undergone numerous currency shifts, such as Brazil etc, yearn for a common currency to unite them to their neighbors.
delphiandomine 57 | 15,334    
19 Apr 2017  #39

Exactly. You could see it with Slovenia, the Baltic States and Finland, all of whom had good reason to push quickly towards the Euro. Even several of the other currencies in Europe are tied to the Euro - the Bosnian convertible mark, the Bulgarian lev and the Danish krone for example.
Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
19 Apr 2017  #40

And let's not forget our dear Polish zloty:-)
DominicB - | 1,822    
19 Apr 2017  #41

@Lyzko

It's not tied to the Euro.
Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
19 Apr 2017  #42

Oh, I realize that, DominicB. However, there are currencies which exists side-by-side with the euro, while not using the euro for daily transactions, in the shop etc., but only on the financial exchanges.
Ironside 42 | 7,793    
19 Apr 2017  #43

This statement is not right.

Look here Fehervary. That is a matter of opinion. You do realize that in such matters legal, juris and rights or whatnot is mostly a political issue with different people/sides having different views and standing on issues.

In this particular case the issue is murky at best and no nearly a clearly cut as you imply.
I'm honestly surprised that such a small territories would even be worthy to rise it as an issue. There is no Hungarian minority there and never has been - so what gives?

First you would have to regain Slovakia - which is at the present is not a very likely.
Second those territories are inhabited with people who own properties there.
Third I don't know exactly the way of the land there but it could be that for strategically reason those territories are important to Poland's interest.

Fourth - you are talking about pre-war border - you're awe that those territories where exchanged not given to Poland.

Meaning there are few conditions that need to be met first:
1,Hungary in a permanent position of Slovakia.
2, Territories exchanged.
3. An ample compensation paid - that could be a quite a sum.
Summary - by the time you fulfil the first condition you might find that you cannot be bothered to go into all those trouble and expenses just because some Hungarian pouring over historical maps has an OCD.

You make no sense dawg! No politically, not strategically. Unless we're talking about huge oil or gold deposits.
Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
19 Apr 2017  #44

You know, Ironside, there is still a small, yet significant, faction within Hungary that wants to regain its former territory presently (and for the last century) prior to the Trianon Treaty, part of Romania aka Transylvania or "Erdely" meaning simply "forest"!

You might laugh, but these people are dead serious, possibly willing and able to back up their strong emotions with the requisite force:-)
Ironside 42 | 7,793    
20 Apr 2017  #45

Well, nothing wrong with it but we are talking here about a relatively small, insignificant mountains region with predominantly polish populace. Is not worth of the effort and money needed to get it.
Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
20 Apr 2017  #46

Yep, you're right about that in the end.
OP Fehervary 1 | 9    
28 Apr 2017  #47

@Ironside
You are absolutely right, but I was curious abot your viewpoints. You know, we Hungarians have a very sick obsession with territories. :)
jon357 57 | 11,346    
28 Apr 2017  #48

Slovakia is Slovakian, not Hungarian. The people aren't Hungarian, so no chance of any change, nor is Poland likely to cede any territory.
Ironside 42 | 7,793    
28 Apr 2017  #49

Yes, you have been robbed Treaty of Trianon and all that. I get it.
Poland has been robbed by Soviets quite recently.
To my mind Poland and Hungary have no territories claims against each other and both countries have much to gain to keep it like that.
mafketis 16 | 4,027    
28 Apr 2017  #50

"Slovakia is Slovakian, not Hungarian"

Officially, about a third of the population is historically more Hungarian ethnically and cultrually.

"The people aren't Hungarian"

A concentrated campaign by the Slovak government to weaken Hungarian is starting to bear fruit. I was briefly there with a Hungarian last summer and while there plenty of adults who still spoke Hungarian not many younger people did....

"so no chance of any change, nor is Poland likely to cede any territory""

Probably true since borders won't change in Europe now without bloodshed and only crazed and deranged freaks want wars.
delphiandomine 57 | 15,334    
28 Apr 2017  #51

A concentrated campaign by the Slovak government to weaken Hungarian is starting to bear fruit.

Quite sensible really, given Hungarian revanchism and the rise of Jobbik. There's plenty of idiots in Hungary driving around with stickers on their cars showing Hungary as it was pre-WW1, so a policy of Slovakisation (is that a word?) makes absolute sense in this context.

It's always fascinated me how Bratislava went from being a Hungarian-German city to a Slovak city.
mafketis 16 | 4,027    
28 Apr 2017  #52

"Quite sensible really, given Hungarian revanchism and the rise of Jobbik"

This predates that back to the early 90's (and possibly helped fuel the likes of Jobbik, Hungarians in Hungary tend to be concerned about their co-ethnics in neighboring countries much more than Poles care about Poles in Lithuania, for example).

"It's always fascinated me how Bratislava went from being a Hungarian-German city to a Slovak city."

Poznań (Posen) went from being Prussian to Polish which is also pretty interesting.
delphiandomine 57 | 15,334    
28 Apr 2017  #53

Yes, the Slovaks were quite scared in the early 1990's of what Hungary could do, especially as they had been stirring the pot in Romania. I can't remember where I read it, but there was some real concern in Romania that Hungary would attempt to seize what they considered theirs, similar to the Lithuanian fear of Poland in those early days. Slovaks are also pretty nationalist, unlike the Czechs.

I'm pretty sure if Poland and Hungary had a border today, they'd be squabbling over it in some way.

Poznań (Posen) went from being Prussian to Polish which is also pretty interesting.

Wasn't Posen still very much a Polish city despite being in Prussia? I thought the German presence there was only a minority?
mafketis 16 | 4,027    
28 Apr 2017  #54

"Yes, the Slovaks were quite scared in the early 1990's of what Hungary could do, especially as they had been stirring the pot in Romania"

Considering what Romania had become in the late 1980s (and the fact that Romania largely actually resembles what Polly claims Poland is) what's the problem?.... one of the signs of communist collapse was the Hungarian communists accepting ethnic Hungarians from Romania as refugees, almost important as the breakthroughs in Poland.

Tensions between the Slovak authority (representing a very small language without much literary or cultural history) and the Hungarian minority go back to the 1980s at least.

"Wasn't Posen still very much a Polish city despite being in Prussia? I thought the German presence there was only a minority?"

I think that's largely propaganda talking. The uprisings made it part of Poland (rather than Germany) after WWI but it also arguably has the most Germanized population (in terms of culture and habits) in Poland (one reason it gained a reputation as being better run than most cities in the commie days and 1990s).
Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
28 Apr 2017  #55

Poles typically prefer a foreigner struggling with the native pronunciation of their cities such as Szczecin, Wroclaw etc. to try saying it correctly, even if it's hard, rather than call them by more familiar, perhaps easier to pronounce, German counterparts:-) When I once said that I was in Stettin, a older Polish gentleman refuse to acknowledge the city I had mentioned until I said "Szczecin"LOL
Nesquik    
28 Apr 2017  #56

The uprisings made it part of Poland (rather than Germany) after WWI but it also arguably has the most Germanized population (in terms of culture and habits) in Poland

The most Gemainized population(in term of culture and hibits) of Poles
Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
28 Apr 2017  #57

Above all, present-day Slask:-) A majority of Poles I've encountered, try to downplay the "Germanness" in their history, not to even mention, their language borrowings!
NoToForeigners 5 | 583    :-(
28 Apr 2017  #58

It's because most Poles don't like Germany. There are many reasons for that including history, an awful and ugly language, ugly women etc...
Lyzko 13 | 2,716    
29 Apr 2017  #59

No, the reason is that the Poles clearly resent a bullying neighbor who slaughtered many of her citizens and arrogantly proceeded to typecast the Slavs as "subhumans", backward peasants who could only benefit from the superiority of Teutonic organization and "efficiency"LOL

Furthermore, German is conversely, indeed ironically, the universal language of culture aka scientific research, classical music, art, and a considerable amount of the the greatest literature of the Occident:-)

As to the language and the women, German is exceedingly beautiful and her women considered to be among the most bewitchingly striking in all of Europe!!!
Ironside 42 | 7,793    
29 Apr 2017  #60

I think that's largely propaganda talking

You think wrong. Should learn a thing or two about history.

No, the reason is that the Poles clearly resent a bullying neighbor

Poles who are interested in politicks don't like Germany due to the recent development with the EU and such. Contrary to popular belief majority of Poles like Germany although they don't like Germans that much.

Don't like Russia much but quite like Russians.




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