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Heresy of Germanization and/or Anglicanization - The genesis; Polish, Slavic opinion


Crow 146 | 9,153
28 Jan 2015 #1
How much are Poles (Slavs) themselves guilty for allowing itself to fall as victims of Germanization, in such a vast numbers. Little of self-criticism can`t be harmful. Question is interesting, for yesterday Germanization, tomorrow Anglicanization. Yes? So, what is the genesis of the problem?
Monitor 14 | 1,820
28 Jan 2015 #2
We Poles are 100% guilty of that. Entering European Union was our free choice. That is the consequence of following money.
Harry
28 Jan 2015 #3
Heresy of Germanization and/or Anglicanization - The genesis; Polish, Slavic opinion

You really shouldn't use words you don't know the meaning of. Here's a hint for you: 'heresy' cannot be used in that way.

How much are Poles (Slavs) themselves guilty for allowing itself to fall as victims of Germanization, in such a vast numbers.

It's funny, but in two decades here I have never met anybody who would care even three-fifths of fcuk all as to that 'question'. Give up, Crow, nobody here gives a flying fcuk about your pathetic efforts to drive a wedge between Poland and her European partners.
Roger5 1 | 1,458
28 Jan 2015 #4
I have never met anybody who would care even three-fifths of fcuk all as to that 'question'.

To be fair to Crow, I once met someone who claimed to care the square root of fcuk all. OK, I made that up. Anyway, Crow's obsession keeps him off the streets.
OP Crow 146 | 9,153
28 Jan 2015 #5
'heresy' cannot be used in that way

it can. You see that it can

It's funny, but in two decades here I have never met anybody who would care even three-fifths of fcuk all as to that 'question'.

Interest for topic exist. Why else would some people hurry to ruin this thread?

nobody here gives a flying fcuk about your pathetic efforts to drive a wedge between Poland and her European partners.

In that partnership Poland seams to be eternal younger partner.

You are from Britain Harry. Who could know more about Britain`s loyalty to partnership with Poland, isn`t it Harry? Please...
Borek Falecki - | 52
29 Jan 2015 #6
The way of all heretics:

First they ignore you, then they say you're mad, then dangerous, then there's a pause and then you can't find anyone who disagrees with you.

Tony Benn

Knowledge of the English language, for example, occurs useful to get to know a liberating from dogmatism story of Neoliberalism:

youtube.com/watch?v=PkWWMOzNNrQ
Ziemowit 13 | 4,262
29 Jan 2015 #7
How much are Poles (Slavs) themselves guilty for allowing itself to fall as victims of Germanization, in such a vast numbers. Little of self-criticism can`t be harmful. Question is interesting, for yesterday Germanization, tomorrow Anglicanization. Yes? So, what is the genesis of the problem?

This is indeed an interesting questions. First, I don't think that Poland is in any way threatened by some sort of anglicization now or in the coming 500 years. To gain some good insight into the processes of anglicization, it would be better to ask why people such the Irish or the Scotish let English be imposed on most of them as their native language. Why the vast majority of them do not use the language of their Celtic ancestors at home now? What made them give up Scottish or Irish and adopt English in their place?

As for the germanization of the Polish people, we know quite a lot about why and how it happened in Silesia. And I mean today's Lower Silesia here since the province being purely Slavic in the Middle Ages has become ethnicly German later on. In year 1097 Wrocław (Breslau) - according to Gallus Anonymus, the most important maedival chronicler of Poland - was one the three main capitals (or seats - sedes regni principales) of the kingdom:

([says Ladislaus Herman about his son Boleslaus the Wrymouth]: Bolezlaus vero, legitimus filius meus, in Wratislaw et in Cracovia et in Sandomir sedes regni principales obtineat).

The crucial figure who (uintentionally) laid the foundations for the prospective germanization of Silesia was another Piast ruler, Henry the Bearded (1165 - 1238), great grandson of Boleslaus the Wrymouth, who brought numerous agricultural settlers from Germany (but also from Flanders, Frisland and Holland) to Lower Silesia, granting them land and exempting them from tax for a certain period of time.

One of the major factors behind the subsequent ethnicity change in Lower Silesia was that those German-speaking settlers were intentionally separated for economic reasons from the indogenous Polish population of the region. Thus - rather than mixing with the locals and subsequently adopting Polish as their first language in the following generations - these people who were commonly referred to as "guests" in the documents throughout the whole 13th century, became majority on the left bank of the river Oder in Lower Silesia. The land on the right bank of the river, however, remained Polish for a much longer time being accordingly described as the "Polish bank" of the river until, I think, the18th century or so.
Marsupial - | 886
29 Jan 2015 #8
You know crow those people have been free for a long time while Poland stagnated. I just see it as modernization. I see remaining just as slavs and only using their way as utter stagnation. World wide this is called globalization. You are either in it or you get left behind. the planet changes all the time, to win one needs to adapt. Germanization.....lol sure....if I know poles they will take all the best ideas and throw the rest in the bin.
Borek Falecki - | 52
29 Jan 2015 #9
In the longue durée of economic history, beyond, or beneath, the cycles and structural crises, lie old attitudes of thought and action, resistant frameworks dying hard, at times against all logic.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longue_dur%C3%A9e
OP Crow 146 | 9,153
9 Feb 2015 #10
few interesting books for reading, to those who seek to found out not only what hostile foreigners did to Slavs but, what Slavs done to itself and, after all, where is the genesis of modern day problems of the Slavic civilization.

slavs

One of the greatest Slavic traitors, pro-Germanic and Nazi heretic - Stepan Bandera, Ukrainian nationalist and fascist. Bandera was political activist and leader of the Ukrainian nationalist and so called independence movement, which as at the time nothing but satellite of the new German reich.

bandera

Stepan Bandera, great pro-Germanic heretic, proven Slavic traitor

read more:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepan_Bandera

On June 30, 1941, with the arrival of Nazi troops in Ukraine, Bandera and the OUN-B declared an independent Ukrainian State".

Massacres on Poles as part of Bandera`s and UPA`s contribution to the Drang Nach Osten

In late 1942, Bandera's organization, the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists, was involved in a campaign of ethnic cleansing of Volhynia, and in early 1944, these campaigns began to include Eastern Galicia.

Lyzko 29 | 7,263
11 Aug 2015 #11
"Germanization" would scarcely have been a Christianizing influence on Poland, not__Polish! In fact, there's been extensive historical debate still raging in some circles, I should add, that claims Germany never truly Christianized, as did Britain or France, for instance. With the success of the Nazis, one might think that the latter day Teutons remained what they always had been - a bunch of pagans who paid lip service to Christian values, but when the chips were down, reverted to their heathen roots in short order:-)
not_polish
11 Aug 2015 #12
Just as Germans were Romanized, so should Polish be Germanized. You become advanced by learning from the most advanced people.

You don't here Germans whining about how Ceasar "oppressed" them.
Lyzko 29 | 7,263
11 Aug 2015 #13
????? A wee bit of a history lesson on your part might well be in order. Not quite sure how to respond to your numerous inaccuracies:-)
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
11 Aug 2015 #14
Just as Germans were Romanized, so should Polish be Germanized. You become advanced by learning from the most advanced people.

What can they teach us, apart from how to lose two world wars in the space of 25 years? Perhaps they could teach us how to have our capital under occupation for 46 years?

Anyway, Germany already became rather Polonised, particularly in the Ruhr.


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