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Defying Germaniztion in 1901 Polish boy writes 'German girls are ugly'


TheOther 5 | 3,711
22 Jul 2011 #91
Des Essientes -- how can you claim to know from his remarks about German girls, which are disdainful rather than angry, that he wasn't also enraged by the forced Germanization in his school's religion classes?

How can you prove that he was enraged by the attempted Germanization? Maybe he was just pissed off because he was rejected by a German girl? The title of this thread is totally misleading.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,436
22 Jul 2011 #92
How can you prove that he was enraged by the attempted Germanization? Maybe he was just pissed off because he was rejected by a German girl?

How can you prove that he wasn't?
Nathan 18 | 1,363
22 Jul 2011 #93
how can you claim to know from his remarks about German girls, which are disdainful rather than angry, that he wasn't also enraged by the forced Germanization in his school's religion classes?

It is my guess. But humans usually attack that side of the enemy which caused us pain. His obsessive writing about women at that tender age and in the most Catholic environment ever couldn't have just appeared like that.

Nathan me and most Polish men will wholeheartedly agree that German girls are nothing to look at.

Depends on shallowness and your intentions. If you are interested on just looking - then yes, Polish gals are amazing. But if you are interested in living with her, having kids or all together, then I think the situation drastically changes :)
TheOther 5 | 3,711
22 Jul 2011 #94
Pennboy --- How can you prove that he wasn't?

Comparing Polish and German girls (read post #63, by the way) is defying Germanization?

Des Essientes -- being the unrealistic German that you are

ROTFL! Are you sure I'm German?
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,436
22 Jul 2011 #95
If you are interested on just looking - then yes, Polish gals are amazing.

There's your answer Nathan. Kids are shallow and look at looks alone most of the time. Here in Philly we have Russian bars and clubs where Russians, Ukrainians, Poles hang out together I've heard at least a couple times from Polish girls when they said they're Polish a guy he answered with amazement 'Ahh Polachka' so they must have found them to their liking.
Ironside 50 | 11,056
22 Jul 2011 #96
His obsessive writing about women at that tender age

Are you an expert ? Is that your diagnosis? Nay, you are writing obsessively about heroes from UPA(mostly BS), family of yours?

Where did I say that?

You were implying .
TheOther 5 | 3,711
22 Jul 2011 #97
Ironside --- You were implying .

That's your interpretation, Iron, and I assure you you are wrong.
Nathan 18 | 1,363
22 Jul 2011 #98
Kids are shallow and look at looks alone most of the time

I always thought that is what adults are after. Plastic operations are done well after 14.

Is that your diagnosis?

Yes, it is my diagnosis, in a way. He suffered a blow on a love field and made that single step which separated love from hatred.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
22 Jul 2011 #99
Yes, it is my diagnosis, in a way. He suffered a blow on a love field and made that single step which separated love from hatred

Your diagnosis foolishly dismisses his patriotic feelings as a Pole in German occupied Poland.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
22 Jul 2011 #100
Except he wasn't living in occupied Poland - which is a term exclusively used to refer to the 1939-1945 period.

In fact, it's rather insulting to compare the brutal occupation of 1939-1945 to the relatively harmonious annexation of 1795-1919.
Nathan 18 | 1,363
22 Jul 2011 #101
Your diagnosis foolishly dismisses his patriotic feelings as a Pole in German occupied Poland.

Neither you, nor I know about him and his feelings. There is nothing 100% in this world. I didn't say he hadn't felt some patriotic thoughts or cared about his country. But the way he expressed himself, IMHO, showed what hurt him the most at that time.
TheOther 5 | 3,711
22 Jul 2011 #102
Des Essientes -- Your diagnosis foolishly dismisses his patriotic feelings as a Pole in German occupied Poland.

Seriously, Des, read post #63 and then explain to me why a simple comparison of Polish and German girls by a 14 year old teenager amounts to "defying Germanization".
porzeczka - | 102
23 Jul 2011 #103
Except he wasn't living in occupied Poland - which is a term exclusively used to refer to the 1939-1945 period.

You are wrong....

the relatively harmonious annexation

This phrase should be always used instead 'the Polish occupation'.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
23 Jul 2011 #104
Seriously, Des, read post #63 and then explain to me why a simple comparison of Polish and German girls by a 14 year old teenager amounts to "defying Germanization".

I suggested that it would be foolish to assume that his patriotic feelings as a Pole in German ruled Poland did not color his opinions regarding German girls. I never said the boy's disdain for German girls' looks and his belief in their inability to love constituted defiance of Germanization. The defiance of Germanization that this thread's title refers to is the refusal of Polish youth, in his school, to pray in German.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
23 Jul 2011 #105
You are wrong. 1, 2, 3, 4 ...

They are wrong - occupation and annexation are two totally different things.

If you want to split hairs, it would be more appropriate to use the Germanic "anschluss" - the country was initially occupied by military forces, then formally annexed into Prussia. But in English, as the territory was part of Prussia and Poland's claims recognised by no-one - you simply cannot use the term "occupation".

This phrase should be always used instead 'the Polish occupation'.

Why? It wasn't occupied.

It might not be what Poles want to hear, but facts are facts.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
23 Jul 2011 #106
But in English, as the territory was part of Prussia and Poland's claims recognised by no-one - you simply cannot use the term "occupation".

The defiant Poles in the territory considered it occupied and rejected the legitimacy of its annexation, but it seems that in the Polonophobic poster's mind these folk were "no-one".
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
23 Jul 2011 #107
In terms of international law and recognition (and according to the usual definition of sovereignty) - they were nothing but a minority living within Prussia. Nothing more, and the land certainly wasn't occupied.

As for "defiant" - I don't call a vast amount of collaboration with them "defiant".

Certainly, they rejected the annexation and considered it occupied - but that was in their mind, not in the world's mind.

(by the way : accusing someone of polonophobia when they quote facts is the domain of the right wing racist in Poland, Des - perhaps you might want to finally admit your LPR-love)
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
23 Jul 2011 #108
As for "defiant" - I don't call a vast amount of collaboration with them "defiant".

This thread is about Poles defying Germanization.

Certainly, they rejected the annexation and considered it occupied - but that was in their mind, not in the world's mind.

So you think that the world has a collective "mind" whose judgement regarding the status of Poland supercedes that of the Polish people, and that is why you are both delusional and Polonophobic.

(by the way : accusing someone of polonophobia when they quote facts is the domain of the right wing racist in Poland, Des - perhaps you might want to finally admit your LPR-love)

I am neither right wing nor racist. I do not feel affection for any contemporary Polish political party, nor do I vote in Polish elections. This thread is about events that occurred in the school system of German occupied Poland in 1901 and my mother's grandparents were enrolled in that school system.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
23 Jul 2011 #109
So you think that the world has a collective "mind" whose judgement regarding the status of Poland supercedes that of the Polish people, and that is why you are both delusional and Polonophobic.

I think you have problems with the idea of sovereignty. Not a surprise, seeing as your own country has frequently abused it.

I am neither right wing nor racist.

Yeah, yeah. The term "Polonophobia" is used exclusively by right wing racists in Poland - what makes you different?

nor do I vote in Polish elections.

Don't have citizenship, huh?
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
23 Jul 2011 #110
The term "Polonophobia" is used exclusively by right wing racists in Poland - what makes you different?

I am different because I am not a right-wing racist, nor am I in Poland. I also doubt your assertion that the term "Polonophobia" is used exclusively by right wing racists in contemporary Poland. You should also be aware that you are taking this thread off-topic by making this assertion about the use of the term "Polonophobia" in contemporary Poland which is 110 years removed from the time being discussed. If you don't believe Poland existed in 1901 shouldn't you on principle refuse to post upon this thread which is after all in the "History of Poland" section of this forum?
Pierdolski - | 31
23 Jul 2011 #111
Germany is a great nation because of all the Polish blood in its veins.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
23 Jul 2011 #112
I am different because I am not a right-wing racist, nor am I in Poland.

Yet you still use the "Polonophobia" label?

I mean - anyone with an ounce of sense would seek to disassociate themselves from those LPR types - yet you seem quite happy to come under their umbrella.

You should also be aware that you are taking this thread off-topic by making this assertion about the use of the term "Polonophobia" in contemporary Poland which is 110 years removed from the time being discussed.

The use of the term has been around for decades - and yes, it was used by right wing racists then, too.

If you don't believe Poland existed in 1901 shouldn't you on principle refuse to post upon this thread which is after all in the "History of Poland" section of this forum?

Why? Polish history includes the history of the people - unless you believe that the Polans somehow magically changed into Polish people overnight.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
23 Jul 2011 #113
Yet you still use the "Polonophobia" label?

No one is putting me under their umbrella but you, an irrational poster who wont stay on topic and who engages in all sorts of fallacious nonsense such as falsely asserting only right wing racists use the term Polonophobia and I must thus be guilty of being a right wing racist. If you could show the posts wherein I have been right wing, or racist, you would have a point, but you cannot because I haven't made any such posts and so you try this idiotic guilt by association approach which, moreover, has nothing to do with this thread's topic. Neither this thread, nor this forum, is a place for cheap personally directed attacks of this sort, but it seems it is you that does not have an ounce of sense and so you continue to make them like a damn fool.
porzeczka - | 102
23 Jul 2011 #114
But in English, as the territory was part of Prussia and Poland's claims recognised by no-one - you simply cannot use the term "occupation".

If there was at least one country that didn't recognize the partitions of Poland and protested against them, would it mean that Poland indeed was under occupation?

Why? It wasn't occupied.
It might not be what Poles want to hear, but facts are facts.

What I meant was the use of the term "Polish occupation" in the following cases: "Polish occupation of", "lands under Polish occupation".

I don't call a vast amount of collaboration with them "defiant".

What is collaboration in such circumstances? Working in Prussian bakery to feed one's family?

Certainly, they rejected the annexation and considered it occupied - but that was in their mind, not in the world's mind.

For the record, the terms: "Prussian Poland", "Austrian Poland", "Russian Poland" were in use when Poland wasn't formally on the map of Europe, e.g. "Higher education in Russian, Austrian, and Prussian Poland (1896)", published by U.S. Government Printing Office; The encyclopædia of geography (1837) See more here.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
23 Jul 2011 #115
There was indeed one very large country that didn't recognized the partitions of Poland and it was called the Ottoman Empire.
Barney 15 | 1,476
23 Jul 2011 #116
Poland was occupied full stop.

A piece of paper doesn’t make it right.
TheOther 5 | 3,711
23 Jul 2011 #117
Every territory that at some point of time was independent or belonged to a different country, but is now a part of another nation, is occupied? So East Prussia, Silesia and Pomerania are actually German (or maybe Neanderthal, depending on how far you want to go back) territories which are occupied by Poland and Russia at the moment? Oppressors, all of them... :)

Or why is Poland different once again?
Barney 15 | 1,476
23 Jul 2011 #118
Every territory that at some point of time was independent or belonged to a different country, but is now a part of another nation, is occupied? So East Prussia, Silesia and Pomerania are actually German territories which are occupied by Poland and Russia at the moment? Oppressors, all of them... :)

No one asked permission it was quite rude really.
Terrible people thought they would never leave.

Edit

depending on how far you want to go back

You edited that to make a silly statement even sillier.
TheOther 5 | 3,711
23 Jul 2011 #119
You edited that to make a silly statement even sillier.

Yeah, sorry for the late edit.

I made it even sillier to show how silly your statement "Poland was occupied full stop" really was.
Ironside 50 | 11,056
23 Jul 2011 #120
Or why is Poland different once again?

if you don't know I will no help you, better tell us what is your problem?


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