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My Grandfather was born in Poland and migrated abroad - Can I get a Polish Passport?


gdyniaguy 1 | 281
28 Jun 2012 #31
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizenship_of_the_European_Union

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passport_of_the_European_Union

gdyniaguy: As an EU citizen and passport holder
You have an EU passport do you? What does it say on the front cover?

maybe you should change my original post to ' as an eu passport holder and passport holder ' ! idiot!
Harry
28 Jun 2012 #32
You have to show US passport

Precisely. You show the US passport when checking in, not when leaving Poland.
I remember you once posting about the time you didn't feel like telling the check-in staff about your US passport.

Then again poking nose in someones business will get ur nose punched just be carefull batty boi!

Do forgive me for not being particularly intimidated by a 50-something shopkeeper.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
28 Jun 2012 #33
Technically, you are a royal subject.
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
28 Jun 2012 #34
Yes.

Whatever! maybe now you are just looking for an english-irish 'them and us' argument.

Well mate with a surname (irish) and ancestory (irish) like mine you wont get one. Tough!

Now p off!
Mleko 1 | 20
29 Jun 2012 #35
Yeah I am who I say I am, wouldn't lie where my grandparents were born :P And all I need are the birth certificates, marriage cert. and death cert. and I'm all good?
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
29 Jun 2012 #36
Yes. Go to your local Irish embassy or consulate first off to register your birth, with your paperwork(originals and copies), then take it from there.

See here:

citizensinformation.ie/en/moving_country/irish_citizenship/irish_citizenship_through_birth_or_descent.html

Avoid the embassy in Boston, Ive helped people in your situation obtain citizenship and the staff in Boston are very abrupt and rude. Others will help you along the process and actually work with you in a courteous and friendly manner.
MoOli 9 | 480
29 Jun 2012 #37
Precisely. You show the US passport when checking in, not when leaving Poland

Harry are you that thick brained?When one comes to Poland he has to enter legally showing Polish passport and thus not stamped,and show US passport & Polish passport when leaving and then again depending o the border guard he may or maynot stamp your US passport(one has to show US passport as to show that you will be allowed to enter US)is it so hard to unerstand this? Then again one can expect that from a career elderly man with a english teaching career:)))[

quote=grubas]You have to show US passport or you won't be allowed on a plane as there is no visa in your Polish passport nor being US citizen you have PRC card.Simple[/quote]

Correct while leaving Poland.
Mleko 1 | 20
29 Jun 2012 #38
Yes. Go to your local Irish embassy or consulate first off to register your birth, with your paperwork(originals and copies), then take it from there.

I will when I get a car, I'm only 14 :P thanks
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
29 Jun 2012 #39
Jaysus!

Smart kid. Thinking ahead and giving yourself options.

You will go far.
Mleko 1 | 20
29 Jun 2012 #40
Thanks, I hope you're right!
gjene 14 | 204
8 Jul 2012 #41
Mleko

If you want to attempt at getting Polish citizenship and passport based on your grandmother take a look at the website: I found my Poland.

Once there, click on forums and look for Poland, once in there look for pt 3 of the Polish citizenship. Ask for Poland expat. He will direct you to a previous post of his as to the paperwork you will need in order to try and prove connection to Poland and thereby citizenship. Also, look into the citizenship acts of 1920 and 1951. Chances are if your grandmother married a foreigner and moved to the U.S. prior to 1951, you may be out of luck. While on the website you can also look into the Irish forum and see what people there have to say about what your chances are for obtaining Irish citizenship based on your grandfather.

But in order to do that, you will need to find out when and where he entered the U.S. and then when he naturalized as an American citizen. Then from there to check when which ever parent is his child was born. Was your parent born before or after your grandfather got naturalized as an American? By knowing that as well, will help to determine if you might be eligible or not.
Mleko 1 | 20
9 Jul 2012 #42
Thank you giene I'm looking at the thread now
silam - | 1
4 Jan 2013 #43
Merged: Citizen of Poland through grandparents - Confirmation of Polish Citizenship (located in the US)

I'm located in the United States and after speaking with the consulate in my city, it appears that I am most likely a polish citizen through my grandparents (currently only my grandmother is alive). My situation is a little strange though.

1. We do not have copies of either of my grandparents birth certificates and they were lost/destroyed in WWII.
2. They entered the United States using papers from a displaced persons camp.
3. All of their paperwork, including US naturalization papers are consistent in the birth place in Poland.

After downloading the forms and attempting to speak with the consulate (I have no polish language skills right now, and his English was poor), I find myself somewhat lost since I don't have the typical paperwork. Do you guys have any suggestions on what to do or a local polish law firm to help? I'm reluctant to use a polish lawyer because I know nothing about the industry and don't want to get scammed, but it seems like that might be the best way.

Thank you in advance.
Harry's mama
4 Jan 2013 #44
Buddy don't. Get scammed polish lawyers you will find on line.i have seen lot of people who they take for ride.best is to come here and do it personally,will cost you same but you will know what are you getting and doing.This would patience and time butispossible....Good Luck
nico
17 Feb 2013 #45
One has to enter or exir Poland as a Polish citizen and produce Polish Id when asked by Polish authorities but to give up US citizenship is wrong

not true! u do not have to give up usa citizenship! false,, check online,, google citizenship by descent polish,, and read for yourself!
brightin - | 2
2 Apr 2013 #46
hi all !,

I was married to a polish citizen for 4 years but already divorced. I live in Poland legally more than 5 years now. I studied in Poland and now working here.

I have a temporal stay in Poland.

Can i apply to the President regarding the new law on citizenship which was established last year?
Monitor 14 | 1,820
2 Apr 2013 #47
Deadline was 2nd July 2012
brightin - | 2
2 Apr 2013 #48
- many thanks . but i was given the forms recently in the office to apply and submit in the office.
- my question mainly is am i eligible to apply?
gjene 14 | 204
8 Apr 2013 #49
Silam

Check into the website known as Poland Information. It will be found at 'information about Poland.' Once on the site click on 'forums', scroll down to where the list of countries are listed and click on Poland. Then when that comes up you will see where it talks about citizenship laws and that sort of thing. Click on that and then you will be taken into that part of the forum. In there you will find Polish citizenship pt3. There will be more informed people in there, since a lot of them have gone through what you are asking about in here. One lawyer I can recommend is Luckas Piotrowski. Chances are you may have to become a member before you can post, but it is free. While there, check the 1st 2 parts and read over the comments in there and see what you think and if it will be of any help.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
8 Apr 2013 #50
it appears that I am most likely a polish citizen through my grandparents (currently only my grandmother is alive

We need to know more details :

When did your grandparents obtain American citizenship?
David1933
26 Aug 2014 #51
Merged: Acquiring Polish Citizenship issue - My grandfather was sent to an orphanage in Russia during the WWII

Hi,

I am trying to get Polish citizenship but my case is a little complicated, so if anyone has any answers then please let me know.

My grand father was born in 1933 in Poland to Polish Parents. During the war he was separated from his parents and sent to an orphanage in Russia.

My understanding is that if he became Russian before 1951 he automatically lost his Polish citizenship. However he turned 18 in 1951 so if he did become Russian before 1951, does the fact that he would have been a minor alter these facts?

Also he is still alive today, so if he did loose it would he still be allowed to re-apply for citizenship? Could I then get it from him that way?

If anyone can provide any help it would be very much appreciated,

Thanks

David
gjene 14 | 204
26 Aug 2014 #52
Did you look up the Polish citizenship acts of 1920 and 1951? Also, check 'website to check passport in poland' click on forums, scroll down to the list and click on Poland. Click on the section that talks about citizenship confirmation. There is 3 sections to it and you will find others with similar situations. Good luck. Let us know what you find.
LisaLisa 1 | 8
20 Sep 2014 #53
Merged: My grandparents were born in Poland - can anyone help me in getting my Polish Passport?

Does anyone have any experience or know of anyone who can help me in getting my Polish Passport? I currently only have my US passport, but I am very serious about obtaining my Polish Passport. Both of my grandparents were born in Poland, but my parents were unfortunately born in US. Any help is greatly appreciated!
gjene 14 | 204
20 Sep 2014 #54
I am sorry to say that you can not get a Polish passport just like that. You have to go through some hoops by getting all the documentation you can as to when your grandparents were born, when they immigrated to the States, when your parents were born. When did your grandparents get naturalized in the States? Was it before or after the parents were born? If it was before you have a very slim case. There is the 1920, 1951 and the 1962 citizenship acts for Poland. There has been some updates to the act within the last 10 yrs, but that may or may not help in case. look up the website known as 'talk for expats in poland' and the forum under Poland. if u were to read the 3 sections that they have in regards to polish citizenship you will learn what others have gone through and what you will need in order to try and get a passport.
LisaLisa 1 | 8
20 Sep 2014 #55
Thanks so much, I am on a mission here, and even though I know it will be difficult and probably costly, I will pay and try anything and everything to get my goal. Thanks so much again!
TheOther 6 | 3,692
20 Sep 2014 #56
my parents were unfortunately born in US

Seriously? You think communist Poland would've been better?

I will pay and try anything and everything to get my goal.

Why?
LisaLisa 1 | 8
21 Sep 2014 #57
were

Yes, It WILL be better than US.
I don't think the rest of the world knows what it is truly like in the States.
It isn't as great as people think it is.
It is bad here too, and getting worse.
Taxed to death and work our fingers to the bone invaded by violent South American gangs, serious violence, drugs, guns, murders, and we have to give them money, housing, food, medical treatment.

Simply horrible. The US government doesn't care about the hard working people just taxing us to death, telling us what we can and cannot do, putting more and more laws into place that help only themselves and making sure we have nothing.

So yes, I think it will be better, at least I wil have hope and be amongst the people I should have been with in the first place.

MY people, people I can be proud of no matter what trials and tribulations we face. I would rather be with the people of my own blood and stand with them!

Why would I pay and strive to be in my real homeland? Like I said, the US isn't as great as it used to be, it is failing and floundering thanks to the so called Liberals who have destroyed the country so that THEY would succeed in politics. They have beaten this country down to nothing. I feel nothing for a country that has turned it's back on me. And they have turned their back on me because of my heritage. So yes, I will pay anything to be able to come HOME, to where I should have been born in the first place.
Ihatechicago
21 Sep 2014 #58
Yeah,I agree that US is in a pretty bad shape but in my opinion it's still a better country to live in than Poland though it may change basically overnight.This is scary!For instance police force here is way worse than Milicja Obywatelska ever was.They basically shoot to KILL whenever they want without any consequences.In some states (e.g TN) they can confiscate your money without any due process or even investigation.Like I said this s**t is scary!
TheOther 6 | 3,692
21 Sep 2014 #59
Yes, It WILL be better than US.

On what facts do you base that assumption? Have you lived in Poland for a couple of years and can compare?

I don't think the rest of the world knows what it is truly like in the States.

I live there.

gangs, serious violence, drugs, guns, murders,

Yeah, Chicago sucks, doesn't it... :)

taxing us to death, telling us what we can and cannot do, putting more and more laws into place

You've never been to the EU, that's for sure.
LisaLisa 1 | 8
22 Sep 2014 #60
Yes I have been to EU Silly You!
I am there half the year or so.
Do you know they are now telling us what we can eat or not eat??
I am serious!
Now when I go to the shops I have to pay to receive a bag if I forget my own.
I am done with this mess. They can av it!
Now where can I go for help in getting a passport???
Arghhhhhhhhhhh!!
PS where are you?


Home / Genealogy / My Grandfather was born in Poland and migrated abroad - Can I get a Polish Passport?
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