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My Grandfather was born in Poland and migrated abroad - Can I get a Polish Passport?


arkkasal 1 | -
28 Feb 2012 #1
Hi,

Somebody may easely help me.

My grandfather (fahter of my mother) was born in Wierzchowce, Brzesc in 1907. He migrated to Argentina around 1924.

I have his original passport issued in the Buenos Aires Poland Embassy in 1924, and has a special page with an authorisation to be used in the USA during 1924 too. I live in Buenos Aires, and I suspect that if his passport was issued in Buenos Aires, the Embassy must have most of the required info.

I need to know if in principle I am elegible to get a Polish Passport.

I am quite sure somebody in this forum may cooment / help.

Thanks in advance!

Ariel
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
28 Feb 2012 #2
I need to know if in principle I am elegible to get a Polish Passport.

When did he acquire Argentinian citizenship, and did he ever serve in the Argentinian military?

Also, your mother - when did she acquire Argentinian citizenship?
gumishu 11 | 5,335
28 Feb 2012 #3
My grandfather (fahter of my mother) was born in Wierzchowce, Brzesc in 1907. He migrated to Argentina around 1924.

I don't think so - according to the law of that time your dad lost Polish citizenship on assuming another citizenship (the law only changed in 1950 - after that date taking some other citizenship didn't mean renouncing Polish citizenship) - but there were some changes made quite recently so you should take a closer look at it with the help of a professional

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_citizenship
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
28 Feb 2012 #4
It's pretty much certain that he would have lost it - even the 1951 law (article 11, point 5) makes it clear that obtaining foreign citizenship results in the automatic revocation of Polish citizenship.

Only in 1962 was it finally changed to stop this happening.
Mleko 1 | 20
27 Jun 2012 #5
Merged: Grand dad born in Ireland, Grand mom in Poland. May I apply for a Polish citizenship?

Not sure if I said that right but here is my info.
Grand dad = Born in Ireland
Grand mom = Born in Poland

They both came to America and got married, I believe my grandma came around WW2 but she died when I was young :\

Am I eligible or do I have to find the birth certificates and all of that stuff?
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
27 Jun 2012 #6
or do I have to find the birth certificates and all of that stuff?

Yes. Chances are that you aren't eligible anyway, but they will need "all of that stuff" to make a decision.
4 eigner 2 | 831
27 Jun 2012 #7
Yes.

I thought you were English. You seem to be very well informed though.;-)
Mleko 1 | 20
27 Jun 2012 #8
ok thanks, I guess it's time to start looking around for something I probably won't find.. -.-
MoOli 9 | 483
27 Jun 2012 #9
I thought you were English. You seem to be very well informed though.;-)

dont forget they are living a cheap high life in Poland:)
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
28 Jun 2012 #10
Grand dad = Born in Ireland

Get an Irish passport. If your grandad was irish.

Q. What is Citizenship by Descent?
A. A person whose father or mother was an Irish citizen at the time of his/her birth is automatically an Irish citizen. A person whose grandfather or grandmother was born in Ireland may become an Irish citizen by registering in the Foreign Births Register at an Irish Embassy or Consular Office or at the Department of Foreign Affairs. A person whose great-grandfather or great-grandmother was born in Ireland may register for Irish citizenship provided that their parents had registered in the Foreign Births Register at the time of the person’s birth

You'll find the Irish more accomodating then the Poles. Once you have your Irish passport then you can travel/work anywhere in the EU.
Harry
28 Jun 2012 #11
Get an Irish passport. If your grandad was irish.

+1
The process is much easier. Although you will need birth certificates and "all that stuff".
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
28 Jun 2012 #12
gdyniaguy: Get an Irish passport. If your grandad was irish.

Trust me the Irish are a fantastic bunch of people. The have great Craic and the little irish girls are great. But beware in Dublin everything is 12 euros!
jon357 63 | 15,170
28 Jun 2012 #13
Am I eligible or do I have to find the birth certificates and all of that stuff?

You never know. The presidents of those two countries might be reading this thread and decide to give you passports. Diplomatic passports if you're really lucky. Or just turn up to their embassies, they might believe you even without "birth certificates and all of that stuff".
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
28 Jun 2012 #14
Mleko

Bear it in mind that Poland doesn't allow Dual-Nationality..so would you want to give up your US nationality for a Polish Passport?
MoOli 9 | 483
28 Jun 2012 #15
Poland overlooks US citizenship:)One dont have to giveup US citizenship!
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
28 Jun 2012 #16
Grand dad = Born in Ireland

Get his birth cert, marriage cert and death cert(if hes passed). Get your parents birth cert, and a copy of yours too.

Job done.

If you cant get a copy of his birth cert, get in touch with the parish he grew up in. They will probably have a copy of his baptismal cert and are very accommodating.

so would you want to give up your US nationality for a Polish Passport?

Wrong.

Am I eligible or do I have to find the birth certificates and all of that stuff?

You wont need to pass a test, undergo health checks, undergo extensive vetting, process 100s of pages of paperwork and swear an oath of fidelity like America makes new wannabee citizens.

Proving you are who you say you are and that your paps actually was born here, is all that is required.
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
28 Jun 2012 #17
Poland overlooks US citizenship:)One dont have to giveup US citizenship!

Polish law does not deal with the issue of dual citizenship. Therefore Poland will view a dual citizen as if he or she was solely Polish. Thus, Poland does not recognize the foreign citizenship of its nationals when they are on Polish soil.
MoOli 9 | 483
28 Jun 2012 #18
Agreed!One has to enter or exir Poland as a Polish citizen and produce Polish Id when asked by Polish authorities but to give up US citizenship is wrong.....the benefit of Polish citizenship is buying and selling commercial and agricultural property without going through hassels of permissions and loans esp EU grants:)))
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
28 Jun 2012 #19
As an EU citizen and passport holder i find the Poles insular towards foreigners.
sa11y 5 | 331
28 Jun 2012 #20
Poland overlooks US citizenship:)

Not just US. You can have dual citizenship, the only thing is that if you come to Poland on Polish passport you are considered Polish in all extent of the law.

Usually nothing terrible unless you do something illegal and get arrested...
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
28 Jun 2012 #21
As an EU citizen and passport holder

You have an EU passport do you? What does it say on the front cover?
Harry
28 Jun 2012 #22
One has to enter or exir Poland as a Polish citizen

Interesting you say that. Who was it who claims to have both passports but recent said that when he leaves Poland he always shows both this Polish and US passports?
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
28 Jun 2012 #23
You have an EU passport do you? What does it say on the front cover?

European Union - United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Island.... passport!

does that answer your question?
grubas 12 | 1,391
28 Jun 2012 #24
Not just US. You can have dual citizenship, the only thing is that if you come to Poland on Polish passport you are considered Polish in all extent of the law.

Seems to be sensible policy.I can't imagine it any other way.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
28 Jun 2012 #25
does that answer your question?

So you are a British citizen not an EU citizen.

Thanks for clearing that up.
grubas 12 | 1,391
28 Jun 2012 #26
Who was it who claims to have both passports but recent said that when he leaves Poland he always shows both this Polish and US passports?

You have to show US passport or you won't be allowed on a plane as there is no visa in your Polish passport nor being US citizen you have PRC card.Simple.
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
28 Jun 2012 #27
So you are a British citizen not an EU citizen.

Thanks for clearing that up.

I am english citizen because of where i was born and a citizen of the street in that town.
i am a british citizen because england is a member of the island of great britain...
I am a Uk citizen because britain and northern ireland make up the uk
I am a european citizen because the uk is a member state of the eu.

My passport is issued by a member state of the EU... it therefore is an EU passport. To somebody from outside of the EU a passport to enter and work in any EU state should they get one.

As a member of the EU I can be afforded protection of another EU member states consulate should i need it outside of the EU.

I hope that clears it up for you.

If you want to be the funny guy by splitting hairs go and do it with somebody of a lower intelligence.
MoOli 9 | 483
28 Jun 2012 #28
Interesting you say that. Who was it who claims to have both passports but recent said that when he leaves Poland he always shows both this Polish and US passports

Harry make it clear if you are jealous or something do something about it as I have said before...or learn to live with it.I am not responsible for your underachievement in your life being a career english teacher in Poland:))or buying a junk car from States idiotically:)And Nope I consider you a nincampoop asking me to post my documents in here similarly when I made you run from AMCHAM meeting to bradelys to hard rock to mariott looking for me sitting across the atlantic:)

Then again poking nose in someones business will get ur nose punched just be carefull batty boi!
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
28 Jun 2012 #30
You are a citizen of an EU state, a British citizen.


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