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How hard is it to get a Polish passport?


BornInTheUSA 2 | 41
5 Jul 2007 #1
Odd question, but having an EU passport would help immensely, so I'm thinking of a dual-nationaliy position. My maternal grandparents were both from Poland and emigrated to the US in the very early 1900s. I have some documentation, but should I even bother? What percentage would I need to prove to be able to attempt a polish passport?
Puzzler 9 | 1,089
6 Jul 2007 #2
It shouldn't be hard for you to get a Polish passport. I would find out the details but am too busy at present. Maybe somebody else can help this guy? And if you get the passport, I'd advise you to stick to Poland; don't settle anywhere else in Europe. Whether it's in EU, or not, Poland is the country that shall do well in the future.

:)
i_love_detroit 1 | 69
6 Jul 2007 #3
I have no idea... but have you seen that discussion on the same topic?

polonia-expat

Hope that helps.
OP BornInTheUSA 2 | 41
6 Jul 2007 #4
Ah - I've not seen this. Thanks - from what I can glean, it was a bit difficult to get it, but that might have changed recently.

It shouldn't be hard for you to get a Polish passport. I would find out the details but am too busy at present. ... And if you get the passport, I'd advise you to stick to Poland; don't settle anywhere else in Europe. Whether it's in EU, or not, Poland is the country that shall do well in the future.

On that, we agree. Poles are industrious, hard-working, and only now starting to assert what they're worth across the continent. Besides, as I said before, when I go to Krakow, I see people that look like my family so I feel so much more at home.

And the girls are hot. Like I need another reason.
Lady in red
6 Jul 2007 #5
icharsky.com/english.asp

seems to be an informative site..........it is a solicitors site though !
OP BornInTheUSA 2 | 41
6 Jul 2007 #6
Hmm...and they're in Krakow. I have to talk with family and see if I can get some supporting paperwork shipped to me first.
rachvt - | 25
6 Jul 2007 #7
Would it be harder than to get a British passport?? (just curious...)
Lady in red
6 Jul 2007 #8
Hmm...and they're in Krakow. I have to talk with family and see if I can get some supporting paperwork shipped to me first.

I think it's all very interesting. I never realised I could get Polish Citizenship.

But, why would I want it and would I then lose my British Nationality because I thought Poland didn't allow you dual citizenship. All a bit confusing really. Wonder if someone can explain it to me, what are the advantages of Polish Citizenship, if you are born in the UK ?
sapphire 22 | 1,241
6 Jul 2007 #9
there are no advantages at all as far as I know.. but the guy is from USA isnt he?
Lady in red
6 Jul 2007 #10
but the guy is from USA isnt he?

Yes he is Sapphire. So, there's some advantage there and I understand there's some advantage the other way round too......Polish citizens wanting to work in USA.

I just wondered what being a citizen of a country meant ?

My parents were both Polish, born in Poland and remained Polish till they died so I think it's easy enough for me to get Polish citizenship. But I'm one of these people that want to know all the advantages and disadvantages , wonder if that's a Polish trait or a British trait <grin>
sapphire 22 | 1,241
6 Jul 2007 #11
well I dont think you are allowed dual nationality so I would hold on to your British passport if I were you, unless you can have both.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163
6 Jul 2007 #12
My maternal grandparents were both from Poland

Well, If your parents were Polish citizens then that would be only formality, but they weren't, even your grandparents weren't and looks like even your great-grandparents weren't because when they left Poland didn't exist, so honestly you rather don't have much chance to get It.
Lady in red
6 Jul 2007 #13
well I dont think you are allowed dual nationality so I would hold on to your British passport if I were you, unless you can have both.

Don't think it can be taken away Sapphire I was born in the Uk. My parents lived in the UK too........and I sound very British as well :)

Joking apart would be nice to get some more information.
Ranj 21 | 948
6 Jul 2007 #14
My maternal grandparents were both from Poland

When he says maternal grandparents, G, he means his mother's parents, hence, his grandparents. :)
Lady in red
6 Jul 2007 #15
My grandparents were Polish too ")

Lol
sapphire 22 | 1,241
6 Jul 2007 #16
Don't think it can be taken away Sapphire I was born in the Uk. My parents lived in the UK too........and I sound very British as well

but if you choose to take citizenship of a country that doesnt allow dual citizenship then dont you have to give up your British passport to do so? Im no expert so correct me if Im wrong, but thats my understanding.
Lady in red
6 Jul 2007 #17
I don't know, that is why I am asking the questions. I plead ignorance and am sure someone knowledgeable will be able to assist with some answers .

Are you Polish Sapphire ?
sapphire 22 | 1,241
6 Jul 2007 #18
no Im 100% English, my only tentative connection is that my partner is Polish...so thats why I lurk around here sometimes.
Michal - | 1,865
6 Jul 2007 #19
But, why would I want it and would I then lose my British Nationality because I thought Poland didn't allow you dual citizenship. All a bit confusing really. Won

Yes you can have two passports if you want to. It is not a good idea to have two passports if you are British in Poland as if you have Polish nationality and you are in trouble with the police or they want to to undertake national service you will have to do it and the British Consulate will do nothing to help you. If you are an American, I do not know though I suppose that it is a nice way to get around all the bureaucracy and be able to work your way around Europe without having to apply for work permits and visas, after all, Poland is in the EU and it gives privileges now.
Lady in red
6 Jul 2007 #20
Thanks for the info. Maybe Poland will have to change now it is in the EU because I understand most EU countries allow dual nationality.Its an outdated law, now in Poland, leftover from the Communist rule.

I hope so, I'd like to have dual nationality.
Michal - | 1,865
7 Jul 2007 #21
I hope so, I'd like to have dual nationality.

Why? I have explained to you why it is such a bad idea. It has nothing to do with Communism. My eldest son got a Polish passport when he was about six months old and had never even been to Poland. Anybody of Polish origin can have one but what for?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,386
7 Jul 2007 #22
My eldest son got a Polish passport when he was about six months old and had never even been to Poland. Anybody of Polish origin can have one but what for?

This seems a strange thing to say. Didn't you have to sign the documents on behalf of your son.
Michal - | 1,865
7 Jul 2007 #23
What has that got to do with anything?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,386
7 Jul 2007 #24
It's OK I understand. Your six month old child made a decision to take Polish nationality and just went for it. All this despite his father's better judgement.

Lady in red, you might have to surrender your British passport before getting a Polish one. You can then re-apply for your British passport.
National service doesn't apply to women and if you are in trouble with the police it's the law of the land that dictates what happens not your passport.
Lady in red
7 Jul 2007 #25
Why? I have explained to you why it is such a bad idea.

Yes, and I listened to your comments and thank you for them. But I am very, very proud of my Polish heritage and therefore would like to hold dual nationality. Why not ?

Anyway, think it's down to the individual person, don't you ?

This seems a strange thing to say

I agree.
Daisy 3 | 1,227
7 Jul 2007 #26
LIR you're trying to reason with a man who marries a Polish woman then constantly slags of Poles
Lady in red
7 Jul 2007 #27
Thanks for that Wroclaw. I am definitely going to look further into it.

I would have told them I was a pacifist anyway (coward really <grin>) if they made me fight. Lol.

LIR you're trying to reason with a man who marries a Polish woman then constantly slags of Poles

I like to think of it as debate, Daisy. We all have different views. I wonder, sometimes if Michal is either, Russian or German descent. Would explain a lot. I certainly don't think he he is Polish or British.

Anwyay, i always welcome healthy discussions so long as Racism or bullying isn't on the topic.

Thanks anyway Daisy. Hope you are feeling better ?
Michal - | 1,865
7 Jul 2007 #28
t have to surrender your British passport before getting a Polish on

Rubbish-you do not know what you are talking about. My boy still has both passports though the Polish one is now out of date and unused.
ukinpoland 5 | 338
7 Jul 2007 #29
You know I saw the saddest thing when I went to get my passport renewed in Warsaw yesterday.
In the consular office there was a married couple and for the whole of the 20 minutes I was there they didnt say one word to another. I couldnt believe it, I lived with my ex-girlfriend and also worked with her. We even took our lunch breaks together and went out together. Even though we did all of this we always had something to talk about. It made me think of what you said Michal about doing your shopping in silence.

I think thats really sad.
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510
7 Jul 2007 #30
how is his son entitled to a polish passport... is his wife a pole...?


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