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If your ancestors were in the "Wehrmacht"...


Torq 32 | 2,897
17 Feb 2010 #31
Germans for hundreds of years in Lower Silesia and they call themselves Silesians and they got the right to do it.

Of course - we already established that. Everyone living in Silesia has right to call
himself 'Silesian'. However, you can also be a German living in Silesia or a Pole living
in Silesia, and still not an ethnic 'Silesian', meaning belonging to the Silesian culture
and ethnos which is distinct from both Polish and German (although being much closer
to Polish considering they speak a Slavic-dialect).

It's a same with you guys nowadays. If you're born in Poland you claim to be Polish.

I claim to be Polish because my parents and grandparents and great-grandparents
were Polish, I speak Polish and consider myself a member of Polish nation and culture.
The sole fact of being born here is far from sufficient to claim to be Polish.
matteroftaste
17 Feb 2010 #32
The sole fact of being born here is far from sufficient to claim to be Polish.

Are you saying that someone who's born in Poland can't really claim he's Polish?
Torq 32 | 2,897
17 Feb 2010 #33
I'm saying it's not enough. What if his parents are foreigners and he just happened
to be born in Poland during their stay here for example and doesn't feel any connection
whatsoever with Poles and Polishness. Why should I consider him to be Polish?
Simply because he happened to be born between Bug and Odra? Doesn't make sense
to me.
matteroftaste
17 Feb 2010 #34
What if he does? He might feel Polish because he was born here.
Torq 32 | 2,897
17 Feb 2010 #35
Well, I always say that your nationality is in your heart and your soul.
If someone feels Polish, speaks the language and loves the country
then I see no reason why I shouldn't consider him to be as Polish as I am.
beelzebub - | 444
17 Feb 2010 #36
I know the facts

Polish "facts" are often exaggerations. It's another one of those things you need to work on.
matteroftaste
17 Feb 2010 #37
If someone feels Polish, speaks the language and loves the country
then I see no reason why I shouldn't consider him to be as Polish as I am.

Nicely said indeed. I love your strict criteria. I wish people like you would be working here in our immigration offices.
THE HITMAN
17 Feb 2010 #38
Polish "facts" are often exaggerations. It's another one of those things you need to work on.

You need to work on accepting that you dont know everything, especially the facts. In person I can present you the facts, but as I said not on here.

Now stop being stubborn, by trying to have the last word.
Torq 32 | 2,897
17 Feb 2010 #39
Are you of Polish descent, Matteroftaste? Have you ever been to Poland?
beelzebub - | 444
17 Feb 2010 #40
Now stop being stubborn, by trying to have the last word.

You project a lot. Look that up.
Ksysia 25 | 430
17 Feb 2010 #41
Can you get rid of the poetic literary stuff?

no, there should be place in the world for a little ancient submergence in the myth. the enlightment was all the hype in 18th century, but that was long ago.
matteroftaste
17 Feb 2010 #42
Are you of Polish descent, Matteroftaste? Have you ever been to Poland?

NO, Lithuanian-German but Lithuanian goes back to 1800's. Yes, I was teaching in Poland.
THE HITMAN
17 Feb 2010 #43
You project a lot. Look that up.

kishman tohe same lohe, look that up !
beelzebub - | 444
17 Feb 2010 #44
no, there should be place in the world for a little ancient submergence in the myth. the enlightment was all the hype in 18th century, but that was long ago.

Tell the truth you are typing Polish into Poltran and posting the output here right?
Torq 32 | 2,897
17 Feb 2010 #45
NO, Lithuanian-German but Lithuanian goes back to 1800's.

Interesting ancestry! Of course you know that Poland and Lithuania were in union
for centuries (1385-1569 - a personal union and after that until 1795 an even closer
one). Isn't that German part of your ancestry Silesian by any chance? Because if that's
the case then Silesian-Lithuanian ancestry would make you practically Polish ;) ;) ;)
Bratwurst Boy 6 | 10,423
17 Feb 2010 #46
For the Berliners my family was "die Polen" as they came to live here after the war as my mom remembers!
matteroftaste
17 Feb 2010 #47
Isn't that German part of your ancestry Silesian by any chance?

no, as I said above my mom is from "Freie Stadt Danzig", you would say Gdansk. As far as the Lithuanian - Polish union, maybe you'll be surprised but according to some Lithuanians I've met, it was an occupation period back then more than a friendship.

I hope you won't get a wrong impression of me, I don't hate Poles or Poland it's just some historical facts that we'll never agree to it.
convex 20 | 3,978
17 Feb 2010 #48
For the Berliners my family was "die Polen" as they came to live here after the war as my mom remembers!

haha, that's awesome, we're the amis
matteroftaste
17 Feb 2010 #49
haha, that's awesome.

I bet BB's parents didn't see it that way.
Torq 32 | 2,897
17 Feb 2010 #50
no, as I said above my mom is from "Freie Stadt Danzig", you would say Gdansk

Oh, right - you said that before. It's my sclerosis playing tricks on me.

As far as the Lithuanian - Polish union, maybe you'll be surprised but according to some Lithuanians I've met, it was an occupation period back then more than a friendship.

Well, we were the dominating side of the Union, that's true - more male-like.
Lithuania was the more passive, female side, but all in all I'd say we were
a good marriage ;)

I hope you won't get a wrong impression of me, I don't hate Poles or Poland

Why, that's mighty nice of you (I couldn't care less if you did hate us, but still it's
nice that you don't :)).

it's just some historical facts that we'll never agree to it

Oh, well - life would be boring if we agreed on everything.
matteroftaste
17 Feb 2010 #51
but all in all I'd say we were
a good marriage ;)

I was told that they were really happy to be divorce from you :-)

Oh, well - life would be boring if we agreed on everything.

and here I fully agree with you for a change, lol
Torq 32 | 2,897
17 Feb 2010 #52
I was told that they were really happy to be divorce from you :-)

Women! *rolls eyes*
Ksysia 25 | 430
17 Feb 2010 #53
Tell the truth you are typing Polish into Poltran and posting the output here right?

Sorry, English is my second language, it may come across rather rough. But the effort is all mine, thank you.
beelzebub - | 444
17 Feb 2010 #54
Sorry, English is my second language, it may come across rather rough.

You are just trying to hard. Speak simply and clearly rather than trying to sound so "smart". Poles have a habit of trying to choose complicated words rather than just getting to the point. Simple is much better for communication :)
Ksysia 25 | 430
17 Feb 2010 #55
happy to be divorce from you :-)

That's a shame! I like to believe that the Jagiellonian period was very beautiful. Later it was not so great. But I hope you have good thoughts about that one, at least.

You are just trying to hard.

Never mind me, it's a uni habit. Always try to impress the promotor. Plus - English really does have all the richness that is not taught at school. Why would I not want it?
matteroftaste
18 Feb 2010 #56
But I hope you have good thoughts about that one, at least.

When I was in Poland I watched the movie "Krzyzacy" and yes it was very colorful, lol.
Ksysia 25 | 430
18 Feb 2010 #57
Don't you think that the Order was a common enemy?
matteroftaste
18 Feb 2010 #58
not really, I liked the costumes tho :-)
marqoz - | 195
22 Feb 2010 #59
Polish "facts" are often exaggerations. It's another one of those things you need to work on.

American have an irritating habit to admonish other nations. Want you to be a World Teacher as you have some troubles with being World Policeman? I'm afraid you need to work on this.
vetala - | 382
22 Feb 2010 #60
according to some Lithuanians I've met, it was an occupation period back then more than a friendship

Except "back then" it was not considered an occupation at all. Force was never used against Lithuanians, there were never any specifically anty-Lithuanian laws or restrictions. If they had complaints they were free to leave, rebel, or veto any legislation they didn't like. The Lithuanians today are simply bitter about the fact that a good portion of their nobility preferred the Polish lifestyle and culture to that of their own. My advice for them is to stop eating at McDonald's and to put on their national dress before complaining about the influence of foreign culture. If they want to claim Mickiewicz as a Lithuanian then they have to accept the fact that he loved Poland dearly.


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