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Using Polish cooking books in an English version?


sobieski 107 | 2,128
31 Aug 2013 #1
Does anyone of your non-Polish guys ever tried to to use a Polish cooking book in an English version?
I came across a horrible example - Polish Heritage Cookery by a guy named Roger Strybel. Not only very bad-written but also unworkable

Are there any better examples which actually promote cooking?
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
31 Aug 2013 #2
I was recommended exlibris-pl.com/ksiazka.htm?id=281 - this one - "Polish Cooking" by Marzena Kasprzycka. It comes highly recommended by a German chef I know.
Harry
31 Aug 2013 #3
Unworkable meaning that the recipes simply don't work?

My Mrs bought the aged parent an English language cookery book which is apparently superb, I'll try to ask for details. But for you, why not try a Polish language book?
OP sobieski 107 | 2,128
31 Aug 2013 #4
Rather a combination of bad recipe structure - I wonder whether that Strybel guy even tried the recipes - and the language.
Of course we have at home the classic Polish cooking books. Nasza Kuchnia...
Harry, I think I am talking fluently in Polish, but analysing kitchen recipes is another matter.
The "unworkable" part comes from my wife. She is doing the Polish cooking in our home. She thinks that Strybel guy writes like an idiot
pam
31 Aug 2013 #5
I came across a horrible example - Polish Heritage Cookery by a guy named Roger Strybel.

A friend of mine has this book and much as I love cooking, I couldn't get to grips with it at all.
The layout is crap tbh, whatever happened to list of ingredients followed by method? Far too confusing.
It's certainly comprehensive I'll give it that, but terribly written!

"Polish Cooking" by Marzena Kasprzycka.

Hmm, might have to order myself a copy!
jon357 63 | 15,068
31 Aug 2013 #6
I suppose there are the two genres of cookbook. One that's mostly a list of recipes, and one that you can sit down with and read as a book. My favourite cookbook writer Elizabeth David is somewhere between the two, though no Polish recipes in her books since she disliked Polish food.
Astoria - | 155
31 Aug 2013 #7
delphiandomine: I was recommended exlibris-pl.com/ksiazka.htm?id=281- this one - "Polish Cooking" by Marzena Kasprzycka. It comes highly recommended by a German chef I know.

The book has only two customer reviews on Amazon.com, both negative:

amazon.com/Polish-Cooking-Traditional-Marzenna-Kasprzycka/dp/1928900615/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377976709&sr=1- 1&keywords=kasprzycka

Unfortunately, the faults of this book apply to most Polish cookbooks. Try Anne Applebaum's new cookbook:

amazon.com/Polish-Country-House-Kitchen-Ultimate/dp/1452110557/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377976266&sr=1-4&keyword s=anne+applebaum

Excellent.
OP sobieski 107 | 2,128
1 Sep 2013 #8
But for you, why not try a Polish language book?

I think using cooking books in any other language as your own is per definition is a challenge. I have a few Nigella Lawson's at home and Jamie as well, but I admit they are more for reading and getting inspiration. That being said and done, that guy Strybel does not have an inkling how to write a proper cooking book which actually works.
jon357 63 | 15,068
1 Sep 2013 #9
I think using cooking books in any other language as your own is per definition is a challenge

Fun though.

I find American recipes to be a bit of a challenge because of measurements given in 'cups'. I've got loads of cups at home and they're all different sizes!
pam
1 Sep 2013 #10
I find American recipes to be a bit of a challenge because of measurements given in 'cups'.

Glasses are quite often used in Polish cake recipes, which threw me a bit until I found out 1 glass is about 250mls.
Many recipes also use decagrams which I found quite strange.
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
1 Sep 2013 #11
Glasses are quite often used in Polish cake recipes, which threw me a bit until I found out 1 glass is about 250mls.

I call it the Communist cup - they seem to be standardised :D

Many recipes also use decagrams which I found quite strange.

Even stranger is when people order in decagrams :( I can't wrap my head around this at all, it's just impossible to count like that :(
pam
1 Sep 2013 #12
Even stranger is when people order in decagrams :(

I didn't know they did that!

it's just impossible to count like that :(

Agreed! I still can't get used to it!
OP sobieski 107 | 2,128
1 Sep 2013 #13
I find American recipes to be a bit of a challenge because of measurements given in 'cups'.

Flemish cookery books quote in measurements, e.g. 110 ml, 250 g....Whereas they explain somewhere which measurement contains what...for example a teaspoon is so much, a glass is so much....

I find Polish recipes on the whole (and I do like Polish cuisine) very time-consuming, elaborate, and lacking the use of half-products.
johnb121 4 | 184
2 Sep 2013 #14
First off, you can easily by a set of measuring spoons and cups - they make US-style recipes a piece of cake (groan)

I got a lovely book from Amazon, called Rose Petal Jam which is a lady's recollections of her youth in Poland, what she found when she returned many years later with her husband and of recipes. Not that many recipes, but it's simply a lovely book.

As we're in the country and in a good neighbours sort of thing (one lift into town = 6 eggs, loan the weed whacker = milk for a week) and I'm a better baker than most of the wives, we get savouries in return for sweet. So I just ask them how they made them. Easy!
Peter59 4 | 35
9 Oct 2013 #15
One Polish Cookbook that I enjoy, might not fit into the catagory you are referring to, in that it is not a translation from a Polish version but originally printed in English is the " Culinary Arts Institute - Polish Cookbook ". Very workable recipes that turn out some very tasty dishes. I wonder what you native Poles think of this books versions of your recipes??

I would also have to agree to some of the other comments on the Strybel book, it is not an easy read or presented in an attractive manner. If experienced in the kitchen though you should be able to follow it.
Concerned
24 Nov 2015 #16
My husband , head chef in uk was given that book from polish friends. The book was sitting in the shelf for few years until yesterday, when I started reading it.... To be honest , I couldn't be more embarrassed! Not only badly translated but also containing poorly thought through recipes. Is it another bestselling and only money making book? Yes! Would not recommend it at all


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