The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Food  % width posts: 39

A request for WHEETABIX to be stocked in Polish Tesco's


Maud
14 May 2007 #1
I live in Poland, and would love to buy the well-known cerearl product, WHEETABIX here. In Krakow (Wieliczka Street) the information desk assistant was of no use "not my department" so who do I contact?

Thanks for the advice! Maureen
szarlotka 8 | 2,209
14 May 2007 #2
They had Weetabix in Warsaw some years ago. Write a snotty e-mail to Tescos customer service people!!
Sylvio 15 | 111
9 Mar 2017 #3
Marmite wouldn't go amiss either
Harry
9 Mar 2017 #4
I live in Poland, and would love to buy the well-known cerearl product, WHEETABIX here.

Marks and Spencer do a very passable version, think it's about 12 zl for pack of 24. You can buy the original version in Kuchnia Swiata but for more than 30zl a pack. Or the original version online from alright but that's about 40zl for a pack of 48.
Marsupial - | 888
10 Mar 2017 #5
Vita brits and promite are better. Much better.
Harry
10 Mar 2017 #6
Vita brits and promite

I've never seen promite in Poland, although I have seen Vegemite. Have you ever seen Weet-Bix here?
johnny reb 18 | 3,683
10 Mar 2017 #8
Promite /ˈproʊmaɪt/ is the registered brand name for a dark brown, salty food paste mainly used as a spread on sandwiches and toast similar to the better-known Vegemite and Marmite.

Promite was invented in the 1950s by Henry Lewis & Company and marketed under the Masterfoods brand.
jon357 63 | 14,148
10 Mar 2017 #9
I prefer Bovril. Makes a nice drink, that and a pie takes me straight back to the kop.

As for weetabix, a few places sell it in PL and Marks and Sparks sell their own brand here.
SilesiaExplorer
10 Mar 2017 #10
Tesco is missing a golden opportunity in Poland to stock more British goods. Weetabix, Shredded Wheat, UK chocolates etc.

It's all a bit of a head scratcher why they don't.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
cms 9 | 1,272
10 Mar 2017 #11
Because space on their shelves is valuable and in high demand. There are maybe 10.000 people who would buy that stuff, spread all over Poland and often either English teachers with no cars, expats who fly home at the weekend or long term residents who have forgotten about Shreddies years ago.

You will not make money with this kind of importing - there are already specialist shops online and physical for French, Italian, Spanish and British expats.

A much better idea is to find some niche where you have expertise and you can roughly work out demand - I know people who made money here importing German bathroom fittings, Italian tiles, Japanese pens, scooter parts, expensive flooring etc. Dom's window blinds idea would be good but someone has beaten you to it.
Harry
10 Mar 2017 #12
It's all a bit of a head scratcher why they don't.

They did have quite a few when they first opened. Not many sold well. And that was before the internet made everything available everywhere.
Marsupial - | 888
11 Mar 2017 #13
Problem is when in Poland i never look for these things because i am stuffing my gut with Polish food. Only.
WhirlwindTobias - | 88
11 Mar 2017 #14
This whole "Tesco should be stocking English food" reeks of entitlement. Talk about fitting a stereotype. I don't get why anyone would move to a different country and want exactly the same shopping choices - learn to adjust. Where I came from I could step into any shop and stuff my bag with flapjacks, now I have to make them at home.

Learn to do the same - plus it's healthier.
Marsupial - | 888
11 Mar 2017 #15
This is making me hungry but i am away and the choices here are pathetic. Grrrr.
gregy741 4 | 1,204
11 Mar 2017 #16
i like wheetabix alot. very popular here in the UK.i got lots of em myself.
i think stocking polish shops with english food would work.lots of Polish ppl have been in the UK at some point.and many got use to english food.

baked beens, quarter ponders,fried becon, steak pies or trifle. i would buy em if in Poland
i just love english fried breakfast with tinned tomatoes,bean,egg bacon and sausages.
WhirlwindTobias - | 88
11 Mar 2017 #17
@gregy741

There are many, many Polish shops in UK cities because Poles can't stand our food. In fact generally Polish people think our cuisine sucks or it's so bad it can't even be considered cuisine. What planet are you on? :P

If your name is Grzegorz, you are an exception I promise you.
mafketis 21 | 7,390
11 Mar 2017 #18
Poles can't stand our food

How many non-indigenous Brits _can_stand British "cuisine"?
gregy741 4 | 1,204
11 Mar 2017 #19
There are many, many Polish shops in UK cities because Poles can't stand our food.

true to some degree..its all about getting use to.i use to hate fried breakfast when i cam to UK. beans were sweet,bacon too salty and tomatoes sour.

i couldnt eat it..now i eat it every second day.and love it. same with english gravy and lots other things.
after 2-3 years in the UK,you start liking english food.
Harry
11 Mar 2017 #20
baked beens, quarter ponders,fried becon, steak pies or trifle. i would buy em if in Poland

You can buy most of that at Marks and Spencer.
gregy741 4 | 1,204
11 Mar 2017 #21
M&S in Poland?
well M&S is very good but very expensive shop.wonder what the prices are in Poland.
and as for tradition.british traditional pies are great,with this mint gravy.

what british are rubbish at compare to polish couisine are soups.i dont like em
gregy741 4 | 1,204
11 Mar 2017 #22
ahhh..i know what would sell well in Poland.
them sausages with herbs inside.from midlands.they called cumberlands?or something like that

There are many, many Polish shops in UK cities because Poles can't stand our food.

as for this one..trust me 100% those shops are used by newcomers.after few years poles dont go to polish shops anymore.more likely they would go to lidl or british supermarkets
Harry
11 Mar 2017 #23
wonder what the prices are in Poland.

Cheaper than Carrefour for some things. A tin of baked beans at the Carrefour near my office is 5.99 zl, at M&S it's 4.59 zl.

cumberlands

M&S had those but they apparently didn't sell well (they were discontinued, now it's pork & Bramley and plain pork).
WhirlwindTobias - | 88
11 Mar 2017 #24
they called cumberlands?

Heh heh, you've adopted the local grammar as well as the terrible eating habits I see. Well, can't fault you on integration that's for sure.

As for your comment on soups - UK soups are closer to flavoured water from Evian than actual food. I still remember the first time my companion ordered soup and I opted out because I didn't want to waste money, only to see practically a main course given to them ^^
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
11 Mar 2017 #25
terrible eating habits

nothing wrong with a good fried breakfast...:) Agree about the beans though.
gregy741 4 | 1,204
11 Mar 2017 #26
i use to eat there everyday.for 2 years,back in 2008-2009..English pies,very trendy nowdays:

google.co.uk/search?q=bermondsey+pies+manze&hl=en&site=webhp&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwigr-q72s7SAhUmOsAKHVe-Br0Q_AUIBygC&biw=1280&bih=590

manze.co.uk
if you ever near bermondsey its place to eat
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
11 Mar 2017 #27
ewwww eels and liquor - got to be the worst food in the world! I tried it once and never again!
I am sure the pies are nice though. Will be in Bermondsey next week as well..
jon357 63 | 14,148
12 Mar 2017 #28
UK soups are closer to flavoured water from Evian than actual food.

Cullen Skink, Cock-a-leekie. Not flavoured water at all. The tomato soup and the oxtail that people make in the UK is actually quite a bit richer and more complex than the equivalent here. I sometimes make watercress soup and people here really like it.

eels and liquor - got to be the worst food in the world!

That's somehow never appealed, like flaczki there's the yuk factor. I see fish and chips is becoming more popular here and although frozen battered fish is only available (as far as I know) in Marks & Sparks and Makro, even Biedronka now sell a (sort of) British-style breaded type.
WhirlwindTobias - | 88
12 Mar 2017 #29
The tomato soup and the oxtail that people make in the UK is actually quite a bit richer and more complex than the equivalent here.

When I have soup in England I no longer feel thirsty.
When I have soup in Poland I could go without a Main and I'm no longer dehydrated.

That's why I compare English soup to water. Rich tomato soup here it may not be, but at least you have rice or pasta inside so you're paying for actual food.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
12 Mar 2017 #30
You need a good Welsh 'cawl'...:):)

Keep to the topic please


Home / Food / A request for WHEETABIX to be stocked in Polish Tesco's
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.