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Is chocolate popular in Poland?


PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
27 Sep 2011 #1
I have a weakness for chocolate spoon cake and I wonder if chocolate is a popular flavor in Poland and if it isn't, what flavors do Poles prefer in desserts?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
27 Sep 2011 #2
There is quite a lot of chocolate here, yes. Wedel, Wawel, Milka, Alpen Gold etc etc. Desserts? Different flavours from Zott or Bakoma. You needn't worry about any lack of goods here in that respect. Wait, you're American ;)
teflcat 5 | 1,032
27 Sep 2011 #3
PP. Doesn't the chocolate spoon snap when you try to eat your cake?
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
27 Sep 2011 #4
Wow! A chocolate spoon!

The taste in PL seems to be for bars of filled chocolate. This sort of thing:

wedel
teflcat 5 | 1,032
27 Sep 2011 #5
The taste in PL seems to be for bars of filled chocolate. This sort of thing:

Very popular, but the best of the best, for me, is something from the Solidarność chocolate people (go on, get your own back pp). Chocolate-covered plums. You can get them in very attractive presentation tins, and shops sell them loose for about 23zł/kilo. They are fabulous. There are imitators who market inferior products, so beware. Accept nothing but Solidarność chocolate plums.
gumishu 11 | 5,326
27 Sep 2011 #6
Chocolate-covered plums.

yes, this is definitely the best Polish sweet - they are actually quite mildly sweet but mmm delicious
Seanus 15 | 19,706
27 Sep 2011 #7
I think I've tried them before. Very tasty :)

Poland has all types of flavours of chocolate. I once got hold of Cadbury's Orange and it was fantastic. The main bars are here such as Mars, Snickers and Twix. Oh, and Bounty too for coconut lovers.
gumishu 11 | 5,326
27 Sep 2011 #8
Oh, and Bounty too for coconut lovers.

who love things filled with chemicals - just read the package
Seanus 15 | 19,706
27 Sep 2011 #9
More chemicals over 'ere :) :) I don't care, I love to see such things as a treat :) PP, try Belcanto choco ice cream from Biedronka. I haven't tried Ben&Jerry's but I have tried Haagen-Dazs and I can tell you that Belcanto tasted every bit as good, if not better. I simply adore the stuff. Augusto and Belcanto are two very good Polish ice cream brands. Zielona Budka and Grycian are slightly more expensive but heavenly. Zielona Budka actually guarantee the quality of Belcanto so you are getting sth really special for 10PLN per 900ml. A big thumbs up here!
gumishu 11 | 5,326
27 Sep 2011 #10
I am not sure Polish ice creams are filled with chemicals but I once had some cheap stuff in England (would never buy it myself actually - just happened to be able to put my hands on it - not that I stole it though :) - that stuff had pretty strange taste and it was virtually packed with chemicals - and you just could positively taste it as well
OP PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
27 Sep 2011 #11
PP. Doesn't the chocolate spoon snap when you try to eat your cake?

No but my mouth melts into oblivion when I eat the cake, for better or worse...
Seanus 15 | 19,706
27 Sep 2011 #12
There are desserts with spoons here. They tend to be ice-cream based.
OP PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
27 Sep 2011 #13
Spoon cake is a rich, decadent, pudding cake that is soooooo good. It's too good. Nothing should be allowed to be that good because people want to eat too much of it.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
27 Sep 2011 #14
cheap stuff

...strange taste and it was virtually packed with chemicals

Hmmm.

Call me crazy but there might, just might be a link between these two statements : )
gumishu 11 | 5,326
27 Sep 2011 #15
true but only also - the main thing was it was not made of cream but based on ... vegetable oil (and a cheap one judging by my taste buds - I actually read what they had to say on the package)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
27 Sep 2011 #16
Haagen-Dazs is Jewish-Polish but they didn't skimp on the flavour :)
pip 10 | 1,661
27 Sep 2011 #17
Hagen daz was started by Polish Jews, however, it is all American- known as foreign branding. Poles do it here with Prince Polo...etc etc.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
27 Sep 2011 #18
True, there is a lot of that around. I'm surprised that Twix is still Twix. I think it's Radar in Germany.

It's hard to say if chocolate is popularly consumed in Poland but there is enough of it :)
gumishu 11 | 5,326
27 Sep 2011 #19
Poles do it here with Prince Polo...etc etc.

I don't get it - is Prince Polo a foreign product re-branded for Poland - somehow I doubt it
Seanus 15 | 19,706
27 Sep 2011 #20
I think, like Brackie, it is from Cieszyn. I seem to recall sth to that effect. It's most definitely Polish although Princessa might be giving it a run for its money.
modafinil - | 418
27 Sep 2011 #21
I'm surprised that Twix is still Twix.

It should be renamed Tvikz, really.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
27 Sep 2011 #22
Or Tłyks, LOL. Could you imagine that? That would be overkill.
OP PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
27 Sep 2011 #23
With a name like Haagen Daz I thought they were dutch.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
27 Sep 2011 #24
It's a made up name. The idea is that it evokes the idea of European sophistication.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
27 Sep 2011 #25
That's what I thought when I was 15 or so. It certainly looks Dutch or even German as they have the umlauts.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
27 Sep 2011 #26
...evokes the idea of European sophistication.

Just shows how wrong they can be LOL

It sounds like a piece of machinery or something to me

"Ooooooh sorry mate, your compressor is on the way out and looks like you'll need a new haagen daz soon as well"
OP PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
27 Sep 2011 #27
It's a made up name. The idea is that it evokes the idea of European sophistication.

I see. When I first saw the name, I thought of Amsterdam and how decedent a city it is and thought they would have this kind of ice cream there. The name reminded me of Amsterdam.
gumishu 11 | 5,326
27 Sep 2011 #28
ok - I didn't know what foreign branding was - and yes both Haagen-Dazs and Prince Polo are examples of foreign branding (after wikipedia)
pip 10 | 1,661
27 Sep 2011 #29
Prince Polo is originally Polish- who owns it now? It is foreign branding within Poland. Much like Reserved, Ginno Rossi, Royal Collection, Quazi and many other Polish owned companies.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
27 Sep 2011 #30
"Haagen Daaz" is a made up name meant to evoke pleasant childhood memories. The two words are modeled the words "noggin" and "Oz".


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