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Cabbage and Noodles of Poland - Golabki?


Kristan1E
1 May 2007 #1
I am from US and my Babci always made cabbage and noodles. She called it Halushki. And Cabbage rolls are Halupki. Can anyone verify that is right?
Eurola 4 | 1,909
1 May 2007 #2
cabbage rolls are goląbki.
I know the cabbage and noodles dish, but I forgot the name. I never made it...
Peanut
1 May 2007 #3
Good. Because you are one of us. Greate to fide polish people. How can we meet each other?
OP Kristan1E
1 May 2007 #4
The Halushki(Cabbage and Noodles) has butter and onions and my Babci always puts salt pepper and vinegar in it. I live in an area in Pennsylvania that has quite a few of Polish people. At the festivals they make Halushki and They make Halupki( cabbage rolls) Is it possible that Halupki is an americanized namefor Golabki.
RemaxGirl
2 May 2007 #5
are you guys talking about lazanki? I think it's the same dish, and that's what we called it where I lived
krysia 23 | 3,057
2 May 2007 #6
Halushki probably means "kluski" and Halupki is "gołąbki". Over the years the words changed a little.

Polish Noodles (Kluski z Kapusta)
Boil egg noodles medium thickness
Sauté in 1/4 pound of melted butter:
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 large onion chopped
1 very large head of cabbage (green) shredded medium when the vegetables are limp, add 1 Tablespoon of caraway seed and salt and pepper to taste. Drain noodles. Pour vegetables over noodles. Stir in 1 pint or more of sour cream.
Dagmara 1 | 38
13 May 2007 #7
Lazanki are made with noodles, cabbage, onions and bacon.
Nowski
25 Jun 2007 #8
When I was growing up my mother used to make a dish that was egg noodles, butter and cottage cheese and she called that halushki. Is anyone aware of that meal and does it go by a different name maybe?
nepa
13 Jul 2007 #9
nowski, that is polish mac and cheese, at least in carbondale pa it is.
sixpfeifs
20 Jul 2007 #10
Yes, you are correct. I come from a polish background and grew up with these foods. They are the best aren't they?
Lady in red
20 Jul 2007 #11
Halushki probably means "kluski" and Halupki is "gołąbki"

I loved both those dishes..........mmmm and pierogi :)
spiritchsr1 - | 4
16 Dec 2007 #12
Quote May 1, 07, 20:01 ¦ #1

I am from US and my Babci always made cabbage and noodles. She called it Halushki. And Cabbage rolls are Halupki. Can anyone verify that is right?

Oh MY! You are talking some GOOD COOKIN HERE.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I am from the U.S. also. My Mom used to make Haluski alot. It was to die for. So Good! My Mom did not use regular noodles though. She used elbow macaroni instead. I still love it, my wife makes it once in awhile. After we found out how fattening noodles are we cut back on a lot of the noodle dishes.

The Hulupki, that's special in our house. My Mom always made a big pot of this for New Years Day and always had a house full of people to eat it all up. She made it with sauerkraut and added tomatoe soup. My wife now makes the same recipe and it is just out of this world for taste and flavor. We are planning to have it for New Years Day. It has become a tradition.

Spiritchsr1
KUCHCIK
9 Apr 2009 #13
Golabki are stuffed cabbage (stuffing is made of meat and rice and packed into soft cooked cabbage leaves, than backed shortly in tomato based souce) depandable on Babcia it can taste bit diffrent, however alaways GOOOOD :)

Now Lazanki can be prepared for both vegetarians and meat eaters (simply by adding some crispy bacon, try no nitriate.) Polish kitchen is quite flaxible so you can cook your lazanki with fresh cabbage and/or add some sauer craut, just make sure it is all soft.

by staing close to fresh cabbage you will get to "sweeter" Lazanki. Adding some sauer craut you will get on the "Bigos" side of the dish ( I like it sweet) you can use fresh moshrooms however dried forrest moshrooms are better (just poor hot water over them and let absorb it, than add to mix before cooking it all in oven) All the dishes are seasoned with salt, pepper, sweet dry paprika, cumin. Once we are around cabbage

I mentioned "Bigos" traditionally hunters dish, there is also a lighter version of it "kapusniak", than "pierogi z kapusta" etc. There is one more dish that not many people know, it is from southern Poland and is called "Duszonki". Anytime we had like gethering with some fire and vodka (biwak) I used to take my large pot with top that I could bolt together, pressure sealed/hermetic. You have your big fire and than you dip your pot into it for the rest of the night till morning, you start another fire and have fun for next couple of hours. In that pot you put all you have. Cabbage, herbs, carrots, onion. Kielbasa,Boczek-bacon, parsley, selery, any left over meat. The next morning you have a melting pot of all the tastes. Kilebasa tastes like cabbage, cabbage like moshroom, moshroom like carrott etc. All soft all so GOOOOOOD :) That is some treat (super for hangover as well)
LMJguy
29 Jul 2009 #14
My buddies Mom from upstate NY made something called Halupki (Russian)..anyway, whatever you call them, they were delicious. lol

We made them a couple of nights ago and the smell alone of them cooking on the stove, took me back in time. I observed his Mom making them one time, and was taught how to "roll and tuck" in the ends, to hold the meat mixture in place. I am also getting better (with practice), at removing the leaves from the cabbage head. lol

I also enjoyed something else she made..Perogi (sp?). Hers had a meat filling and I beleive she also made a potato version. (reminds me of a Empanada

Enjoyed reading the comments posted here.. thanks for sharing
Seanus 15 | 19,706
29 Jul 2009 #15
I agree with Dagmara above, it's likely to be łazanki. £azanki is one of those underrated foods.
dtrain the slav
5 Jan 2010 #16
No. Halupki is the slovak word for cabbage rolls.
yehudi 1 | 433
5 Jan 2010 #17
I used to take my large pot with top that I could bolt together, pressure sealed/hermetic. You have your big fire and than you dip your pot into it for the rest of the night till morning,

We do that here in Israel too. We call it "Poika". I have no idea where the word comes from, but young people do this at campfires (without the bacon).

It's funny to hear that stuffed cabbage is called Halupki. In Yiddish it's called "Holopches", apparently derived from Halupki. Among Jews there is "Polish" style Holopches which is sweet and sour, and "Galicianer" style which is less sweet and has more salt and pepper.
polkamaniac 1 | 482
6 Jan 2010 #18
I think this is the recepie you are looking for-------------

KLUSKI Z KAPUSTA (POLISH NOODLES AND CABBAGE
McCoy 27 | 1,269
6 Jan 2010 #19
Halushki. And Cabbage rolls are Halupki

sorry mate but it seems that your grandma wasnt polish but slovak. Halupki isnt americanized name for golabki but slovak name for the same stuff. halushki is slovak national dish but its not with cabbage but with cheese. maybe the one your granda made was some variation of the original recipe.
polkamaniac 1 | 482
6 Jan 2010 #20
Hej--kristen-read my post above-I know you'll like it.
tempo111
1 Sep 2011 #21
I am Slovak. You are right about Halushky. That's how it's pronounced but it's spelled with
no 'h' and the 's' has an upsidedown 'v' on top.
The cabbage rolls are holubky. You were close enough. Holubky means pidgeons.
Enjoy!
Sidliste_Chodov 1 | 441
1 Sep 2011 #22
It's funny to hear that stuffed cabbage is called Halupki. In Yiddish it's called "Holopches", apparently derived from Halupki. Among Jews there is "Polish" style Holopches which is sweet and sour, and "Galicianer" style which is less sweet and has more salt and pepper.

I've always known them as holishkes :)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
1 Sep 2011 #23
Tempo, it's pigeons in Polish too :)
scottie1113 7 | 898
1 Sep 2011 #24
And my second favorite dish after bigos.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
1 Sep 2011 #25
Hunter's Stew is really good. The ubiquitous cabbage shows up. Japan had amazingly good noodles with cabbage. Their ramen soups were sth to die for. God, I miss their noodles. The Poles could learn a thing or two from them.
beckski 12 | 1,617
2 Sep 2011 #26
Hunter's Stew is really good.

I have to agree with you 100%. I can't wait to have some at the Polish Bazaar, during the end of September.
SlovakSue
22 Oct 2011 #27
what is the meal that is shreded real fine potatoes then the water squeezed out of the potatoe and add flour and a tiny bit of salt, mix that all together and then drop little dumpling from that mixture into water, cook till they float then add that to finely shredded cabbage that has been fried in butter stir and heat through and eat! mmmmmmmm. that is what i am having tonight but what is it called?? my grandmom used to make it by the bucket full
MadejD
19 Mar 2014 #28
That sounds like Kopytka or Pyzy.
cochrantrc
20 Aug 2014 #29
I am originally from a Pittsburgh suburb where real haluski (halushki) are made from tiny egg dumplings and the haluski (cabbage) is made with onions, chopped cabbage sautéed in butter over a low heat until the cabbage is slightly browned seasoned with salt and pepper only. The dumplings are added half-way through the cooking when the cabbage is still barely tender. The Americanized version uses egg noodles, but nothing compares with the tiny dumplings! Stuffed cabbage are always referred to as Halupkis.
Cardno85 31 | 976
21 Aug 2014 #30
£azanki is one of those underrated foods.

Very much so, such a simple dish, so easy to make, and so tasty. Infact, even when you buy it pre made, it's pretty good.


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