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Which ingredients/vegetables/fruits/meats are nonexistent in traditional Polish cuisine?


jon357 64 | 14,382    
16 Apr 2019  #91
There are certainly fusion restaurants in Warsaw.

Interesting about culinary continua. Some things like kielbasa, cabbage soup, kasza gryczana etc.are popular from Western Poland right the way to Vladivostok.
DominicB - | 2,645    
16 Apr 2019  #92
The word "kiełbasa" is of Turkic origin, and buckwheat originated in Yunnan, China.
jon357 64 | 14,382    
16 Apr 2019  #93
Yes. It's still the staple food of DPRK and of course as the old saying goes, Russia too.
10iwonka10 - | 383    
16 Apr 2019  #94
To broaden the subject- Which dishes are not nonexistent in Poland. What about sandwich with chips or with fish fingers:-) ?
DominicB - | 2,645    
16 Apr 2019  #95
Bułki z frytkami are a signature dish in Szczecin. And fishburgery are quite popular, especially with kids.
10iwonka10 - | 383    
16 Apr 2019  #96
These are not traditional Polish dishes but just copied lately from English spoken countries...followed by 'quality entertainment' shows.

polandin.com/37248352/polish-child-obesity-numbers-scaling-fastest-in-europe
DominicB - | 2,645    
16 Apr 2019  #97
The bułka z frytkami was thought up by Polish customers of a Kebab stand in Szczecin in 1992, and became a cult hit. Pretty much a well established local tradition now. No connection to British chip butties.
jon357 64 | 14,382    
16 Apr 2019  #98
fish fingers:

Very big sellers in PL, probably more than anywhere else. I've never seen them in a sandwich though (fortunately).

Mixing sweet and savoury isn't something that goes down so well in Poland.
DominicB - | 2,645    
16 Apr 2019  #99
Very big sellers in PL, probably more than anywhere else.

A lot of Polish kids won't touch any other kind of fish, even the same fish breaded and fried in a different shape.

I've never seen them in a sandwich though (fortunately).

I have. A lot. Kids love them.

google.com/search?q=fishburger+z+paluszkami
OP RandomUser    
16 Apr 2019  #100
What about tofu in Poland? Is tofu nonexistent, or growing trend, or popular in Poland?
10iwonka10 - | 383    
16 Apr 2019  #101
Tofu- I think it is growing trend especially in vegan-vegetarian places.
jon357 64 | 14,382    
16 Apr 2019  #102
Tofu

Plenty of restaurants have it now, and all decent-sized supermarkets.

A friend of mine (with a small farm) near warsaw grows goji berries. He says they're the coming thing.
pawian 150 | 7,905    
16 Apr 2019  #103
What about tofu in Poland?

It isn`t placed on best, reach shelves in Polish supermarkets. I once tried regular and chilli, but both were too bland, too rubbery and too unfatty.

He says they're the coming thing.

Advertised as the healthiest fruit in the world.
delphiandomine 85 | 17,602    
16 Apr 2019  #104
but both were too bland, too rubbery and too unfatty.

There's a trick. You need to squeeze all the water out of it, preferably by first squeezing it and then leaving it with something heavy on top for an hour or so. After that, marinate it with whatever spices/herbs you like, and leave it overnight in the fridge. Next day, it'll be perfect.

I'm quite fond of it because it's very filling and yet it doesn't leave you feeling bloated.
pawian 150 | 7,905    
16 Apr 2019  #105
squeeze water out, with something heavy on top for an hour.

Oops, delph, at my age, I am certainly going to forget that I put it there and it will rot like hell. :):) Or, is rotten blue tofu better than fresh?
delphiandomine 85 | 17,602    
16 Apr 2019  #106
Ah come on, give it a try ;) It works well enough as long as you squeeze all the water out first, so for instance, I was sometimes cooking it with onions, garlic, turmeric and whatever other spices I felt like adding.
Lri 4 | 38    
16 Apr 2019  #107
What about tofu in Poland? Is tofu nonexistent, or growing trend, or popular in Poland?

I'm picturing tofu pierogis (or at least I'm trying to)...
jon357 64 | 14,382    
16 Apr 2019  #108
I'm trying not to ;-)
Lri 4 | 38    
17 Apr 2019  #109
Have any of you ever tried preparing traditional Polish dishes using international ingredients like crab, lobster, leeks, bean sprouts, bok choy, kohlrabi, chick peas and others? And also traditional Polish desserts using international fruits like papaya and others? I think someone on here already asked about use (or non-use) of coconut, mango, pineapple in traditional Polish recipes
pawian 150 | 7,905    
17 Apr 2019  #110
using international ingredients

Nice list but leek and kohlrabi have been used in Polish cuisine for a few centuries.
jon357 64 | 14,382    
17 Apr 2019  #111
And also traditional Polish desserts using international fruits like papaya and others?

Yes; there's a lot of scope. If you don't have your own fruit in the garden or you're doing something out of season, there's no reason not to try something else from the shop.

leek

I find that leek's used less in PL than I was used to back home.
OP RandomUser    
17 Apr 2019  #112
Which dishes are not nonexistent in Poland

How about Mexican/Latin American cuisine (in the fast-food sense) in Poland? Tortilla dishes for example burritos, chimichangas, empanadas, enchiladas, fajitas, guacamole, nachos, quesadillas, (soft or hard) tacos etc. The largest (and only) international Mexican fast-food chain is Taco Bell, I think some Taco Bells in Europe but not (yet) in Poland
mafketis 17 | 6,752    
17 Apr 2019  #113
There were two or three of them in Warsaw in the mid 1990s but while they always seemed to do a brisk business whenever I was there they disappeared after a few years (corporate fvkkery I suppose).

Flour tortillas are widely available but not in any real Mexican incarnations... nachos are also available and occasionally fried corn tortillas are and that's about it. A few upscale stores have a few other things but usually overpriced...

Fresh corn tortillas are nowhere to be seen :( I love Mexican food but a lot of my favorite dishes depend on fresh corn tortillas so... (grnarl, grumble, rumble)

In the 1990s the city I lived in had a "Mexican" restaurant and I went there a time or two and it was not remotely Mexican (not that I expected it to be....)
Lri 4 | 38    
18 Apr 2019  #115
How about Mexican/Latin American cuisine

Has African-Caribbean cuisine found its way to Poland as yet? Like jerk chicken & jerk beef, pork, etc. (Jamaica), injera (Ethiopia and neighboring countries)?
DominicB - | 2,645    
18 Apr 2019  #116
Diverse international cuisine is a hallmark of countries that have experienced substantial immigration with the establishment of distinct and stable immigrant communities. or whose citizens are well traveled, like the US and the UK.

As far as the first is concerned, Poland has received relatively little immigration. The only established immigrant community is the Vietnamese, who are an odd group that are mainly invisible. They have opened restaurants, but few if any serve Vietnamese food, serving a highly Polonified form of "Chinese" food instead. The only other large group of immigrants is the Ukrainians, who started to come in large numbers only about five years ago, and whose culture and cuisine are not radically different from the native cuisine. They haven't been in Poland long enough to establish stable communities yet, and whether they do or do not will be affected by their ability to rapidly integrate into Polish culture, which I estimate is rather high.

Compare that to the US or the UK, which have abundant immigrants from all over the world, and myriad immigrant communities and neighborhoods dating back a very long time. Or Germany, where millions of Yugoslavs and Turks were invited as "Guest Workers" during the sixties.

As for the second, Poles have not had the opportunity to travel extensively abroad to exotic locations. The exceptions are Tunisia and Egypt, where Pole take advantage of cheap off-season package resort deals. They do not come into much contact with the local culture and cuisine there, though. as they generally stay in the resorts, which serve them Polish meals. Otherwise, travel is mainly restricted to the nearby countries in Europe. There has been extensive emigration of Poles to the richer countries of Western Europe, especially the UK and Germany, where many of them do encounter a vibrant international cuisine. It is primarily among those emigrants who return to Poland that a desire to see more culinary options in Poland is developing. Returning migrant workers to Italy have awakened a great appetite for Italian food in Poland, and pizza is ubiquitous and has "gone native". Migrant workers to Germany brought back a craving for Turkish kebabs, which are likewise ubiquitous.

Compare that to the US or the UK. The taste for Indian food in the UK owes a lot to the fact that so many citizens were dispatched a solidiers or civil servants to the subcontinent when it was under their rule. In the US, a lot of the craze for diverse cuisine is due to the fact that so many American soldiers saw duty in Europe and the Pacific in WWII, and were later stationed there for decades. Also to the fact that the US borders with a county that has a vastly different culture and cuisine, which is not the case for Poland. After WWII, Migration of Americans to Southern California and Texas skyrocketed, and elements of Mexican cooking were adopted into the local cuisine.

None of this has happened in Poland, which is why the international food scene is still in its infancy. Add to this the fact that until thirty years ago, there were few restaurants of any sort in Poland, and that disposal income among younger Poles, the ones who are most adventurous and most likely to try new foods, is still relatively low.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,666    
18 Apr 2019  #117
Has African-Caribbean cuisine found its way to Poland as yet? Like jerk chicken & jerk beef, pork, etc.

why would it? what a strange question.
Dominic explains it well.
Lri 4 | 38    
18 Apr 2019  #118
Considering how this thread is about nonexistent foods in traditional Polish cuisine (plus a few posts about nonexistent dishes & cuisines in Poland), I should have instead worded my question "Is African-Caribbean cuisine nonexistent in Poland?". My bad!
jon357 64 | 14,382    
18 Apr 2019  #119
"Is African-Caribbean cuisine nonexistent in Poland?"

Both African and Caribbean cuisine exists in Warsaw, as does Brazilian.
cms neuf - | 739    
18 Apr 2019  #120
There are a few chains now with burritos and other Mexican stuff - most food courts have some kind of Mexican offer and in all the big towns there are Mexican restaurants of different quality. Warsaw has a couple of very good ones.


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