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Herb used in Polish rosol (chicken soup)?


jon357 63 | 14,280
21 Sep 2017 #61
The leaf is 'Natka Pietruszka' in Polish.
DominicB - | 2,701
21 Sep 2017 #62
@jon357

Or just simply "pietruszka".
Ironside 49 | 10,196
21 Sep 2017 #63
"Pietruszka" is used for both root and leaf parsley.

Dominick is right.
jon357 63 | 14,280
21 Sep 2017 #64
Go into a shop and ask for pietruszka - you'll get Hamburg Parsley. Ask for natka pietruszka, you'll get flat-leaf parsley.

Dominick is right

In which decade did you last buy ingredients for rosol in Poland?
Ironside 49 | 10,196
21 Sep 2017 #65
Ask for natka pietruszka

Stop changing the subject. He didn't say anything about shopping but about meaning and he is right about it. You're not.

If you ask for it you should say - nać pietruszki
natka is a diminutive form of nać.
nać is a general name of a green top of an eatable root-like veg. Could be parsley, could be carrot or seler/ cerley.

Well, jon MR know it all. Ah well you could ask for natkę piertuszki too.
jon357 63 | 14,280
21 Sep 2017 #66
piertuszki

Sounds a bit rude. At least it isn't pierdeczki.

And I am right. Hamburg Parsley isn't a common ingredient in Western Europe - it's basically Holland and eastwards.
DominicB - | 2,701
21 Sep 2017 #67
Holland

Have they moved Holland? Is it not still in Western Europe?
jon357 63 | 14,280
21 Sep 2017 #68
Have they

Have you read "Holland and eastwards"?

Or tried to buy pietruszka in Western Europe?
DominicB - | 2,701
21 Sep 2017 #69
Checked Google Maps, and according to them, Holland is still indeed in Western Europe.
jon357 63 | 14,280
21 Sep 2017 #70
Read carefully, Dommy, the phrase

and eastwards

And have you tried to buy pietruszka in Western Europe?
DominicB - | 2,701
21 Sep 2017 #71
@jon357

If it is available in "Holland and eastwards", it is available in Western Europe.
jon357 63 | 14,280
21 Sep 2017 #72
Don't be daft - you're just trying to argue.

As an ingredient, Hamburg Parsley (not actually that common in Holland, however Jane Grigson does refer to it there) is only traditionally found east of a certain line. If you can get it in Britain, Spain or France at all, it's only in shops catering to diaspora communities.

It's essential for rosol z kury, and although it resembles parsnip (rare in Poland) it has a more bitter taste.

I've used it as a substitute for parsnip (parboiling it then baking it coated with flour and parmesan is nice) however there are some flavour differences.

In rosol z kury, you also find marjoram - something of a catch-all in Polish cookery, rather as sage used to be in the UK.
kaprys 2 | 2,121
22 Sep 2017 #73
Personally, I would never use marjoram in rosół. I don't really recall tasting it in it. It's fine with żurek and fasolka po bretonsku, though. It helps you digest. Perhaps some add it, but I think it would dominate the flavour.

As for rosół, you can add bayleaf, allspice, pepper. Both root and leaf parsley. Lovage will certainly add flavour most Poles associate with rosół but unlike maggi it's natural. Some add horseradish but it's really hard to get nowadays. The flavour should be rich and the soup healthy so obviously lots of veggies like carrots, root celery and parsley, leeks. A lot depends on the household, though.
DominicB - | 2,701
22 Sep 2017 #74
Perhaps some add it, but I think it would dominate the flavour.

I've had rosół with marjoram, and it does dominate the flavor. Same with dill. And lovage really powerfully dominates. Other things I've tasted include garlic, carraway and juniper berries. The garlic was good when I first got to Poland, but was later replaced by a different variety that tastes horrible to me. I stopped using garlic altogether in my cooking because I couldn't stand it.

Leeks and savoy cabbage are quite common, and usually included in the bundles of soup greens that you can buy in stores. Curious how horseradish would taste. Sounds nice. Never had any problem getting horseradish root in Poland.
gumishu 11 | 5,127
22 Sep 2017 #75
Same with dill

Dill is very good with tomato soup especially if the tomato soup is served with boiled rice - not surprisingly tomato soup is often made frome the leftover Sunday's rosół

but I wouldn't add dill to rosół itself
Roger5 1 | 1,458
22 Sep 2017 #76
Some add horseradish but it's really hard to get nowadays.

Pretty easy round my way.

as sage used to be in the UK

Sold in chemist's here as a hair tonic. I've made sage and onion stuffing for poultry but Poles gave it a suspicious sniff.
kaprys 2 | 2,121
22 Sep 2017 #77
Dunno -perhaps I don't see horseradish as I don't look for it. It must be sold around Easter for sure - some people still make their own chrzan tarty. Also you need it to make ogórki kiszone.

As for adding it to rosół, I remember my mum did so when I was a kid but just a tiny bit.
jon357 63 | 14,280
22 Sep 2017 #78
Pretty easy round my way.

A lot of shops have it - biedronka sell it as part of the bunches of pickle herbs.
kaprys 2 | 2,121
23 Sep 2017 #79
They don't really sell these all year long. Again since I don't make my own ogórki kiszone/konserwowe, I don't really look for it. I'm kind of surprised you do.

As for dill, I add it to cucumber soup and new potatoes.
Wulkan - | 3,251
23 Sep 2017 #80
The leaf is 'Natka Pietruszka' in Polish.

No, it's "Natka Pietruszki" in Polish

At least it isn't pierdeczki.

Doesn't matter, no such a word in Polish.

but I wouldn't add dill to rosół itself

I like dill in rosół but then again, I like dill with almost everything.
gumishu 11 | 5,127
23 Sep 2017 #81
As for dill, I add it to cucumber soup and new potatoes.

new potatoes and dill - mmmhm yummy - and some zsiadłe mleczko to accompany them - i'm melting right now ;)
jon357 63 | 14,280
24 Sep 2017 #82
I'm kind of surprised you do.

Why are you surprised, kaprys? We always make our own. The bundles generally have some horesradish in. Carrefour, Makro etc also generally have some in stock when it's in season.

Doesn't matter, no such a word in Polish.

Google it.
Wulkan - | 3,251
25 Sep 2017 #83
Google it.

Sure

About 41 results (0.27 seconds)

Did you mean: pizdeczki

No such a word.

new potatoes and dill - mmmhm yummy -

But only Polish breed of potatoes, here in the UK they have terrible taste.
kaprys 2 | 2,121
25 Sep 2017 #84
@gumishu
Surely delicious ;)

@jon357
good for you. Am I not allowed to be surprised?

Btw, as for herbs in general, I also recommend czosnek niedźwiedzi - wild garlic or whatever it's called in English.
johnny reb 20 | 4,541
25 Sep 2017 #85
Thank you kaprys for the tip.
I knew and do use wild onion but never knew of wild garlic.
After googling it to see what the plant looks like I will now be on the lookout for it to give it a try.
jon357 63 | 14,280
25 Sep 2017 #86
good for you. Am I not allowed to be surprised?

You are allowed to be surprised ;-)

The home made ones are always better, and so easy to do. The only problem in my house is that, being delicious, they get eaten as malosolny - we don't always let them pickle for long enough. I also do British-style red cabbage, since I find the type in jars in Poland to be too mild for my taste. The secret with that is to use allspice and peppercorns, plus sweet vinegar (if you can get it).

For rosol, we rarely make that with chicken (and use both pietruszka and natka pietruszka if we do) but very often do beef rosol - it's a good base for soups.

For that rosol, I use basil, thyme and marjoram.

About 41 results (0.27 seconds)

So there you go. The rare words are the best for catching out unschooled people.
kaprys 2 | 2,121
25 Sep 2017 #87
@jon357
My mum makes great ogórki kiszone so I don't have to ;) Knowing myself I don't think I am patient enough to wait long enough. I buy them at the greengrocer' s too.

As for red cabbage, I make my own : red cabbage, chopped onion, grated apple, vinegar and oil.
And I hardly ever make Polish style chicken soup.Mine is pretty thick with slices of carrots, root parsley and celery, boiled with onions and bayleaf- I just get rid of these before serving and add natka and black pepper instead. I sometimes add lovage, too.
kaprys 2 | 2,121
25 Sep 2017 #88
@johnny reb
I first tried it last year and I really like it. Plus it is said to have lots of health benefits. :)


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