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Translate from Polish to American English/or to Polish


Hausfrau    
7 May 2018  #1
Hello,

My boyfriend is a certified translator from his native lanugage (Polish) into English. He has a master's degree in Poetry and has translated several books into Polish and from Polish into American, British and Australian English. He can translate any kind of document, even legal papers.

As a native English speaker and an author myself, I can tell you he is quite good. His name in English is Jerry. You can reach him at Jerry

Hope this helps you find a good translator into or from Polish.

Wendy
Wulkan - | 3,277    
7 May 2018  #2
His name in English is Jerry.

Nah, Jerzy is not Jerry, Jerzy is George but I agree, using Jerry is more convenient.
Atch 17 | 2,656    
  7 May 2018  #3
No such thing as 'a degree in poetry'. A degree in literature with a Masters in Poetry is possible though. Not sure it's the best qualification for a translator though. How did he get certified with no degree in Translation studies? And translators don't translate both ways, only into their native language.

Also there is no such thing as Australian English, unless you're talking about slang you flamin' galah! And I don't think that would translate very effectively into any language,especially not Polish :)) Standard English in Australia is British English.

If you're going to try to drum up work for somebody get the CV right or don't bother. Strangely enough your boyfriend seems to have the same name as the JU translation software app.
mafketis 17 | 6,529    
7 May 2018  #4
A degree in literature with a Masters in Poetry is possible though

don't you mean a degree in literature with a concentration (or specialization) in poetry?

Standard English in Australia is British English.

really? the latest thing I've watched from Australia (please like me) didn't really sound slangy or British to me...

and I'd say lots of things can't be translated very effectively into in any kind of neutral English, things like comedy for example. A translation of Miś that would work for a British audience might leave an American audience cold (and vice versa or course)
Atch 17 | 2,656    
7 May 2018  #5
don't you mean a degree in literature with a concentration (or specialization) in poetry?

Hi Maf. No, I mean somebody takes their BA in English literature and then takes a Masters in poetry. In DCU, Dublin we have an MA in Poetry Studies and in the UK there are definitely MAs in creative writing in either prose or poetry. I think it's a fairly new thing though.

Regarding Australia, what was the thing you watched? I'm not sure I follow your point. Apart from their accent, what difference did you see in their use of English to standard British English? If you get a business letter from Australia, they'll use British English, as they do in their legal system etc. just as we do in Ireland. I'm not sure how somebody would translate a Polish document into 'Australian English', how would it differ from British English? They use many British terms in their English, for example handbag rather than the American purse but they don't have a different standard Australian word for handbag....... They do use some Americanisms, but then don't we all these days :)
mafketis 17 | 6,529    
7 May 2018  #6
. In DCU, Dublin we have an MA in Poetry Studies and in the UK there are definitely MAs in creative writing in either prose or poetry.

Well an MA is also a degree so I was confused... Don't think that exists in the US it would usually, I think, be a degree in English (BA MA or PhD) with a concentration or specialization in poetry or creative writing or whatnot...

In terms of standards, I wasn't referring to institutional and/or bureaucratic stuff (I will say I've turned down work where they want something official sounding for the UK because I don't know British institutional terminology well enough) I was referring to what used to be called educated speech (the everyday language of native speakers with some post-secondary education).

Yes, you're right that the idea of translating documents into "Australian" might be kind of ridiculous, but I was referring to what might be called 'expressive usage' where more than the grammar and plain semantics are important.

Regarding Australia, what was the thing you watched?

A tv series, I mentioned the name in the post (in parentheses), kind of a dry comedy *** drama (or drama *** dry comedy).
Atch 17 | 2,656    
7 May 2018  #7
Oh yes, I see what you mean now. I took a quick look on YouTube, it looks quite entertaining. Of course Aussies don't sound English, they have a variety of Australian accents according to region or socio-economic group but in the scene I watched a bit of, the guy has taken a shopping trolley from the supermarket and he tells his friend he's taken a 'trolley' which is British English, American is shopping 'cart', is it not? So that's what I mean by the standard being the same as British English. And Australian English is no more slangy than American or British, it's just that they have some unique expressions which are used only in Oz. That's what I would consider to be Australian English.
mafketis 17 | 6,529    
7 May 2018  #8
kind of a dry comedy *** drama (or drama *** dry comedy).

And I now see the Latin word for 'with' is censored by the bots..... maybe I should have written cvm?


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