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Australian citizen wanting to go to Poland for as long as possible - needs Polish Visa


melplasap - | 2
13 Jan 2014 #31
We want to stay in Wroclaw as family lives there. I am only young, 20 years old. I have 2 certificates of completed business studies and working experience, 2 years in each. What would be my best option in line of gaining employment? My partner moving to Australia will not be possible without a partner visa to me after we have lived together for one year. Poland is our best bet. Any suggestions are muchly appreciated.
DominicB - | 2,707
13 Jan 2014 #32
I am only young, 20 years old.

At that age, you're not going to find any work. Teaching is flat out, as is just about anything else. The only possible option you have is a really, really lousy job in a call center, and that's not going to pay the bills. Nor is any call center going to go through the hassle of applying for a work permit for a lowly flunky. Sorry, but you're dreaming, and Poland does not treat dreamers kindly.

By the way, I live in Wrocław. It's a great city to live in if you have cash, but can be depressing as hell if you don't. Don't expect long-term hospitality from your partner's parents. They might put you up for a week, perhaps, maybe even two at the outside, but after that you will be expected to contribute your fair share of the bills. Otherwise, they will unceremoniously give you the old boot in the behind. It's always open season on moochers in Poland.

Your best option is to stay in your respective countries and pursue your education. At your age, you can little afford to waste time bumming off in Poland. You'll see in a few years that the ease of learning you now take for granted begins to dissipate, so do all you can to learn now while your brain is young. And give up silly dreams of long-distance love with someone on the other side of the planet until you have some real salable qualifications and experience under your belt.
jon357 74 | 22,469
13 Jan 2014 #33
At that age, you're not going to find any work. Teaching is flat out, as is just about anything else. The only possible option you have is a really, really lousy job in a call center, and that's not going to pay the bills. Sorry, but you're dreaming, and Poland does not treat dreamers kindly.

Pretty well, though some Callan schools will employ almost anybody. They will however pay someone of stufdent age absolute peanuts.
DominicB - | 2,707
13 Jan 2014 #34
Pretty well, though some Callan schools will employ almost anybody.

They're going to be far too cheap to pay the fee required for a work permit for a non-EU citizen. Plenty of British and Irish jetsom and flotsam already on the ground, especially in a popular city like Wrocław. No need to import a clueless slacker from the other side of the planet.
jon357 74 | 22,469
13 Jan 2014 #35
They're going to be far too cheap to pay the fee required for a work permit for a non-EU citizen.

This is true.

Plenty of British and Irish jetsom and flotsam already on the ground, especially in a popular city like Wrocław. No need to import a clueless slacker from the other side of the planet.

Poland is filling up with people who don't know when to use an apostrophe let alone the difference between a defining and non-defining relative clause and in any case don't know how to actually teach it who've come because their gf/bf is Polish. Why go through the hassle of sorting out a work permit for someone when there's a ready supply of bods who don't need them?
DominicB - | 2,707
13 Jan 2014 #36
Poland is filling up with people who don't know when to use an apostrophe let alone the difference between a defining and non-defining relative clause and in any case don't know how to actually teach it who've come because their gf/bf is Polish.

They're thick like cockroaches here in Wrocław. Warsaw and Kraków must be positively swarming with them.

And if I hear one more hard luck story from a British or Irish guy who came here in pursuit of Polish poontang and got burned bad, I'm going to shoot him and put him out of his misery, and remove him from the gene pool. Just got treated to yet another episode in this never-ending last Friday. same old story, over and over again. Seriously, I fail to see what is so fascinating about Polish women. It certainly isn't their talent for giving foot massages (a top criterion for me). They're high maintenance, and panic at the slightest sign of trouble, lashing out in vicious fury to anything within striking range. Perhaps I can't blame them, as their financial situation is not as secure as in the West, and they have bad childhood memories of living on the brink of poverty.
jon357 74 | 22,469
13 Jan 2014 #37
Warsaw and Kraków must be positively swarming with them.

You don't really see them in Warsaw. There's a long term contingent of washed up EFL teachers often staying because if they left they wouldn't see their kids. Most of them do know how to teach, and not all are European.

The real problems are out in the sticks, where they've gone to live in their g/f's hometown with unreasonable expectations. The lucky ones are collecting rent from a flat or house at home.
DominicB - | 2,707
13 Jan 2014 #38
There's a long term contingent of washed up EFL teachers often staying because if they left they wouldn't see their kids.

Have a good friend here in Wrocław in that very position. He's fed up with teaching, and especially by the fact that his income hasn't increased at all since the economic crisis started. He can't do anything but teach, and can't improve his qualifications because cash and time are too tight having to support a wife and two kids, and because he never bothered to learn Polish.

Really don't know a lot of Americans or other non-EU nationals among the long-term teachers here in Wrocław. I can only think of one, an American, who still teaches and makes a decent go of it. Perhaps it's because Americans are less likely to take the Polish poontang bait hook, line and sinker, and also because few Americans come here expecting to stay on a long-term basis, unless they're retired and can live off their savings.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,368
14 Jan 2014 #39
People do not seem to give you much hope, but i say give it go. In the end if nothing comes out of it at least you would have has some experience. True it would be sensible to take some savings with you, you might want to pursue education further education in Poland in English which might enable to to gain some gainful employment later on....

In short where there is a will there is a way, if you are really committed to your partner and she is to you, it could work out. It is worth will exploring if either one of your parents and grandparents were Europeans, that way you could get an EU passport, which would make things easier.
melplasap - | 2
24 Jan 2014 #40
Thank you for being kind about this. I hardly consider myself a "clueless slacker from the other side of the planet" as some people may think. Everything is worth trying. Our relationship is actually genuine and real and it is worth doing everything we can to be together permanently. I have looked into further education at the University of Wroclaw. I am sill waiting to hear back for information as I only completed school up to year 10. No graduation. Although during, I completed 3 Business qualified and related certificates. What are my chances of being accepted into a University? Its a tough one.

I know that my mothers grandfather, my great granddad, was British and came out to Australia as a grown man.. Can that help me? Or does it have to be a closer relation?
Harry
24 Jan 2014 #41
What are my chances of being accepted into a University?

Without having finished school in Australia, Polish unis are unlikely accept you. Also, the courses which are taught in English are paid and are not cheap.

I know that my mothers grandfather, my great granddad, was British and came out to Australia as a grown man.. Can that help me?

Sadly not, British passports can only be passed down one generation to those born outside the UK.
Kocio
24 Jan 2014 #42
As I said living in Poland is hard even for Poles, from many reasons. Many of mine friends have foregin man and none of them decide to live in Poland. Uk, Scotland,France, Italy, germany etc. but not Poland. You schould come to Poland, see for your own eyes, gain your own cick-ass and then decide. Don't burn bridges behind You. Save some money and have a long vacations in Poland, try to find job here and you will see whats then. Poles are very hospiteble nations, dont belive externals. You are very young person, if not now so when? This is your time.
local_fela 17 | 172
24 Jan 2014 #43
As I said, the "foreign boy moves to Poland to be with Polish girlfriend" story rarely has a happy ending.

True! I've been through and saw my foreign friends having the same issue!

Our relationship is actually genuine and real and it is worth doing everything we can to be together permanently.

at 20... mmmm I was the same mate! Been there done that. Moving to another country because of a girl- it is not really a good idea- you can ask any of us (how has experience and how it ended).. i think you need ideas from your friends and families rather than us here. Because if the girl dumps you, then I don't know what will happen to you!

the fact that you moving to a new country which is not really similar to yours and on top the language will be your biggest enemy! Its gonna be hard mate! One thing- if you really want come over to Poland- dont do it because of a girl! Girls you will find plenty here. But think about YOUR future first!
maniak677 1 | 14
24 Jan 2014 #44
If you're bright, have a positive attitude, good qualifications and want to learn the language you can do well in Warsaw. If you've been a success in your country you will be here. There are many opportunities. You need to network well and find out what people / companies need your skills. There are plenty of small businesses here run by expats and they're always looking for people. The city rewards risk takers and outgoing people. Stay away from the burnt out expats for obvious reasons.
DominicB - | 2,707
25 Jan 2014 #45
I am sill waiting to hear back for information as I only completed school up to year 10. No graduation. Although during, I completed 3 Business qualified and related certificates. What are my chances of being accepted into a University?

Zero. Without graduation, no Polish university will even consider your application, regardless of how many business related certificates you have.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,368
18 Feb 2014 #46
You could start a degree in Australia and then try to get a transfer to Poland. It might be worthwhile trying to find out which Australia companies operate in Poland as well.
sobieski 106 | 2,118
25 Feb 2014 #47
But why are all the expats on this forum teaching / wanting to teach??? No offense meant but there a better jobs in this world.
I have never ever applied for a teaching position in Poland - don't know even if there is a market for Dutch native speakers...I guess there is one....
Brulinski - | 2
14 Apr 2014 #48
You are not thinking. Moving from a country with plenty of jobs to one with basically none. LOL
Monitor 14 | 1,817
14 Apr 2014 #49
You're joking. Poland has over 5 mln more jobs than Australia.


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