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Australian citizen wanting to go to Poland for as long as possible - needs Polish Visa


Auspole 1 | -
24 Feb 2012 #1
Hey everyone.
Im a 21 year old male living in Australia wanting to go to Poland for as long as possible. I was wonderring how difficult it is to get a tourist visa or a working visa?

I have 4 years in hospitality experience and have qualifications in fitness (if any of this helps), i have no criminal history, also my grandfather who was a Polish ww2 veteren died when i was 2 (heard somewhere that having a bloodline can help me get citizenship there, true?).

I would appreciate any help as to knowing how difficult it is to getting a visa into Poland and how long for etc.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
24 Feb 2012 #2
I was wonderring how difficult it is to get a tourist visa

Easy.

a working visa?

Difficult.

I have 4 years in hospitality experience and have qualifications in fitness (if any of this helps)

It doesn't.

also my grandfather who was a Polish ww2 veteren died when i was 2 (heard somewhere that having a bloodline can help me get citizenship there

It can help.

I would appreciate any help as to knowing how difficult it is to getting a visa into Poland and how long for etc.

Ambasada Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej w Canberze

canberra.polemb.net
lawyer
9 Mar 2012 #3
I'm a lawyer based here in Poland. I think that you would be able to get a Polish passport, so there won't be any need for a visa.

However, if you get a job in Poland, they will give you a work permit as well.

Contact: Low fees.
mitaki
25 Jan 2013 #4
If your grandfather was Polish then you have a chance to get a Polish citizenship/Polish passport. If your Grandfather was still Polish Citizen when he died then his child and your parent had a right to be Polish Citizen. If this person is alive she/he needs to apply for a Citizenship and then after this person obtains it you have the right too because to become a POlish CItizen by birth you have to have at least one Polish parent, no matter where he/she is born.

This was a case of my son, whose Father is an Australian. I however still hold a Polish Passport (as well as an Australian). It took a few weeks to process some documents because the applicant has to first apply for a PESEL number (Powszechny ELektroniczny System Ewidencji Ludnosci - what is like a personal number on a list of Polish people) that you need to wait for before they can start the passport issuing procedure and few hundred dollars to pay, but then the benefits of having a dual Citizenship and the Citizenship of European Union are greater.
MoOli 9 | 480
25 Jan 2013 #5
I was wonderring how difficult it is to get a tourist visa

hey bud go to your local pharmacy and they have that kit next to photoshop kit:))) just get it sail to poland and live with it:)))
Cameron89 - | 1
27 Jan 2013 #6
Merged: Australian citizen looking at coming to Poland - Visa help

Gday im looking at coming to poland but needa find work first im an australian citizen and would greaty like to come to poland as ive spent tome ther before but only for a short time if i was to apply for a travell visa for poland would it be possible on travells if work was made availabe i could apply for a work visa? Any information would help:)
PJGC
14 Mar 2013 #7
Merged: Work or residency visa in Poland (I am an Australian citizen)

HI,

Can someone PLS help me how I could find information or apply for a work or residency Visa in Poland?

Thank you.
Harry
14 Mar 2013 #8
Which do you want: a work permit or a residency permit? They are very different things.
PJGC
14 Mar 2013 #9
I understand that they are different. I guess right now I am looking into options.
However, probably more so interested in residency.

If anyone could point my in the right direction or tell me what they know, please do so. it would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers :)

IS ANYONE ABLE TO HELP ME WITH THIS PLEASE?
AmerTchr 4 | 201
18 Mar 2013 #10
Do you have a job or a reason to request residency in Poland?
PJGC
19 Mar 2013 #11
Yes. My partner is Polish.
I will not be seeking residency for this though. I want to live Poland.
I want to find out how long I could stay in Poland for on a work visa and also what the process is to apply for residency. I am just looking at the best options at the moment.

Please help anyone..

Thank you! :)
Monitor 14 | 1,820
19 Mar 2013 #12
You may want to check embassy website: polish.embassycanberra.com

Probably you must get invitation from a polish company. It means that they must want to employ you and prove that cannot find anybody wanting to work for given salary with same skills in Poland. I don't know, but maybe some language schools may want to give you such invitation. Unfortunately it's a little bit of hassle, so only few companies would be ready to do that.

Other option for you is to come on tourist visa and teach students illegally in their/your home. If you choose to live in small studio, and search well for clients, then it should be enough for you to pay for rent and food. Meanwhile you could search personally for a company which would help issuing you working visa.

When your tourist visa expire you can simply go abroad and enter again.

Or just marry her/him
PJGC
26 Mar 2013 #13
Thanks so much :)
I dont think I could marry him in Poland or Aus lol
Monitor 14 | 1,820
26 Mar 2013 #14
"you can simply go abroad and enter again." - this part is not true. I have learned that 90 days visa is given for 180 days, so you would have to wait at least another 90 days to enter country again.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
26 Mar 2013 #15
I dont think I could marry him in Poland or Aus lol

Why not?
NelsonMenela - | 4
26 Mar 2013 #16
hague1cmaeron

PJGC: I dont think I could marry him in Poland or Aus lol
Why not?

cause gay marriage is not legal in poland yet ;)
Monitor 14 | 1,820
26 Mar 2013 #17
But in Netherlands are and if marriage is honored in one EU country, then officially you're family, and you must get permit to stay as family of polish citizen. But you should investigate if it's correct what I say.
Harry
26 Mar 2013 #18
I want to find out how long I could stay in Poland for on a work visa and also what the process is to apply for residency.

You can't get a work permit yourself, a company has to apply for that for you (and then your work permit is tied to that specific company). So you basically need to find a company that wants to give you a job here. I suppose that you could come here and then look for a job but you only have 45 days in which to get your residency permit application in, and if you're planning to apply for a residency permit on the basis that you have a legal job here, that doesn't give you much time to find a job.
PJGC
26 Mar 2013 #19
AWESOME! Thanks for the info :)
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
26 Mar 2013 #20
cause gay marriage is not legal in poland yet ;)

What about Spain or the Netherlands?
jon357 67 | 17,648
27 Mar 2013 #21
Or Belgium too for that matter. But as the law stands at the moment other EU countries make their own rules. If however you have long-term residence in a Schengen state (however that is obtained) you can spend up to 3 months in any other Schengen state. And since there are no border controls, it's quite hard for the authorities to know where you actually are.

Of course working, which generates a tax liability, is a whole different matter.
Warszawette - | 128
27 Mar 2013 #22
Hi! And .... France within a couple of weeks! :)
Monitor 14 | 1,820
27 Mar 2013 #23
And after marriage in let's say Netherlands you can work there as long as your spouse is also working there. Only after 5 years of living in 1 eu country you can try getting permanent permit to stay and thus be independent from where your spouse is. This is to prevent selling marriages for passports.
melplasap
12 Jan 2014 #24
Merged: Australian wanting to move to Poland asap ( advice needed )

Hi, I need some help in moving to Poland.. My partner is Polish and I want to move over there to live with them. What can I do to make this happen? Ive read up on migrant and I think I need a contract to work there. Where can I find a place that will hire me asap?- Office business is my experience area.

Thank you
DominicB - | 2,709
12 Jan 2014 #25
Honestly, it is going to be very, very, very difficult for you to find gainful employment at a satisfying wage in Poland. The chances of your significant other finding such in Australia are astronomically higher.

Unless you have some heavy duty certificates, qualifications and experience, especially in IT engineering, your ability to find a job at all, and a good-paying one at that, is severely limited, especially if you don't know Polish very well. Basically, you'll be restricted to two options, neither of which is attractive enough to justify making the move from Australia to Poland:

1) Teaching English: pays poorly, and there are precious few jobs for non-Eu nationals. The job market for English teachers is not good right now because of the economic crisis. At best, you will make barely enough to survive, that is, if you do manage to find a job at all. Calculating in the cost of airfare, a certification course and the fees for your residence permit, and taking into account the fact that you will be paid for only seven-and-a-half months a year (you don't get paid for holidays, and there is precious little work to be had during the summer vacation), you might well end up in the red after the first year, and probably just barely break even during the second, even if you lead a very, very frugal lifestyle.

2) Cold call sales/marketing or low-level collections in a call-center. A truly lousy job that pays too little to survive on. I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.

Sorry to pi$$ on your campfire, but the "foreign boy moves to Poland to be with Polish girlfriend" story very, very rarely has a happy ending. The guy almost always ends up dissatisfied with being unemployed or earning far too little, and the girl loses interest in a guy who can't pull his own weight.

Polish girls and "in-laws" are fine as long as you are bringing in plenty of cash, or at least enough cash to stay safely in the black. Once you dip into the red, the love withers and the hospitality dries up. They will feel no compunction in making it clear that you are no longer welcome.

Polish "mothers-in-law" are extremely skilled in making your life miserable when they are so inclined. Polish women are notoriously mercenary, and have little cash registers in their heads that keep a running tally at all times. They will know exactly to the penny where you stand. Don't disillusion yourself by thinking that your girlfriend and her mother are exceptions to the rule. As I said, the "foreign boy moves to Poland to be with Polish girlfriend" story rarely has a happy ending. VERY rarely. It usually ends up as a horror double feature.

If, on the other hand, you have some REAL SOLID education, qualifications and experience that might be in demand on the extremely competitive Polish job market, please let us know. Otherwise, your dream is unrealistic, and you would be much better off living in Australia, where jobs are a lot easier to find, wages are much higher, and opportunities to improve your qualifications and quality of life are much more abundant, especially for you.

One more thing: there is next to zero demand for non-EU office workers in Poland. The market is over-saturated with applicants who are much easier to hire than you. Getting a work permit for a non-EU national is a costly and time-consuming hassle that few, if any, Polish employers will be willing to deal with for a mere office worker. You would have to have some serious and unique qualifications to find work in that area. Furthermore, wages for office workers are generally abysmal.
Sparks11 - | 335
12 Jan 2014 #26
There are quite a few people from New Zealand teaching English in Warsaw, I've met a few Aussies too. It's really not that hard and not so dire you can earn enough to live, travel a bit etc. work doesn't dry up for seven months of the year. I even had some classes the days right before and after Christmas and New Years. If you teach in company and are decent at it, they will want to have English lessons with you most of the year. Come on a tourist visa and take a look around, some schools sponsor visas. It's especially easy in Warsaw where there are many, many companies paying for English lessons with Native Speakers. Get a CELTA first though.
DominicB - | 2,709
12 Jan 2014 #27
Warsaw

Of all the places that I would advise the OP to avoid, top on the list would be the popular destinations like Warsaw, Kraków and Wrocław, followed closely by Poznań and Gdańsk/Gdynia/Sopot. There are scads of wannabe "English teachers" scrambling for table scraps. The best jobs are already taken, and those require at least a CELTA, which is going to cost about $1000 US. In-company work and work during the summer goes preferentially to experienced established teachers. There's little for newbies. Few schools have any incentive to go through the harrowing process of getting a work permit, and most are reluctant to offer a real work contract, opting instead for useless "garbage" contracts (umowa zlecenie and umowa o dzieło), neither of which will help the OP land a residence permit. The few jobs to be had are mostly in lousy, low-paying schools like Berlitz, Callan, Avalon and "Direct Method" schools. It would take a lot of luck to land a real work contract in a good school for decent wages.

If there are still opportunities to be had, it is in the less popular cities like £ódź, Katowice and environs, Rzeszów, Lublin, Białystok and Bydgoszcz, or in smaller towns out in the province, particular out east, like £omża, Augustów or Tarnów, where the competition is far less intense. Furthermore, the cost of living is high in the popular cities, and the wages are not much higher than in the provinces, if at all. However, as the OP apparently has a particular destination in mind, this greatly diminishes his ability to cast his net wide and his chances of finding a suitable job in someplace far off the beaten path.

Sorry, but the boat has sailed for English teachers in Poland, especially for those who wish to work in the popular cities and who come from outside the EU. The OP is far better off remaining in Australia, where he can gain useful work experience and beef up his qualifications in order to increase his future earning potential, and perhaps earn enough to save up a significant amount of money, which will be impossible in Poland. Like I said, when you factor in the cost of airfare, the residence permit and the certification course, there's not much incentive to move from Australia to Poland.
Sparks11 - | 335
12 Jan 2014 #28
Augustow....? Really guy !? Trust me there is plenty of work in Warsaw you can find a job here. Not sure about sorting the work permits but there are plenty of Non-EU nationals on the ground and working.
dhrynio 5 | 97
12 Jan 2014 #29
First of all where are you and your lady planning to settle? Are you set on one place or are you open? I know of a school here in £omża who just yesterday asked me if I know any native speakers willing to move here and teach, they are opening a new school in Zambrów soon and need more people. I do know that some of what Dominic mentioned above is true but his tale is very dread and woe, not true all the time and in all places. If you are willing to look outside of the major cities you can find work for very good money and still have plenty to live and travel.

You can PM me and I can set you up to talk with him if you like.
Maybe 12 | 409
12 Jan 2014 #30
Cold call sales/marketing or low-level collections in a call-center. A truly lousy job that pays too little to survive on. I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.

I second that.

olish women are notoriously mercenary, and have little cash registers in their heads that keep a running tally at all times. They will know exactly to the penny where you stand

This is very true, however, it can be used to your advantage if you are smart.

Polish girls and "in-laws" are fine as long as you are bringing in plenty of cash, or at least enough cash to stay safely in the black. Once you dip into the red, the love withers and the hospitality dries up.

I don't think that it is a purely Polish phenomena, I think it is more a universal rule.


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