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Foreigners in Poland and what they think of us


Kenneth78 - | 25  
21 Oct 2010 /  #31
Outside of Poland is there a reason to learn Polish,,probably not??

Well here in Norway people tend to choose learning German, French and Spanish. But I learn Polish and I think this is more useful than learning the other mentioned languages. In Norway there are lot of workers coming from Poland, and some Germans as for the French and Spanish people I never meet them. I am a driver for a living and when I deliver to building sites Polish can be very useful. For me I can say that to learn Polish is a better option and more usefull than learning Spanish or French.
guesswho 4 | 1272  
21 Oct 2010 /  #32
out of curiosity, do you, guesswho, speak any Polish?

answer here #26 (above)

But I learn Polish and I think this is more useful than learning the other mentioned languages. In Norway there are lot of workers coming from Poland, and some Germans as for the French and Spanish people I never meet them.

In your situation it might make more sense because you're working with Poles. Other than that I don't see any reason to learn Polish unless one lives in Poland for a longer period of time.

I personally like languages and learn it whenever I can but it doesn't mean that someone who feels different is an ignorant.
A J 4 | 1075  
21 Oct 2010 /  #33
Why should we care?

Because other EU countries are paying additional taxes for Poland, and there are many foreign investors who happen to make profitable deals with the Polish. I wouldn't underestimate foreign relationships. But what the average guy and girl might, or might not think of your country wouldn't be too much of a concern to me either.

:)
Bzibzioh  
21 Oct 2010 /  #34
there are many foreign investors who happen to make profitable deals with the Polish. I wouldn't underestimate foreign relationships.

Foreign investors would invest wherever they see potential for profit, not out of goodness of their heart so I don't see the connection.

But what the average guy and girl might, or might not think of your country wouldn't be too much of a concern to me either.

So we finally agree on something. Cool.
dtaylor5632 18 | 1998  
21 Oct 2010 /  #35
Foreign investors would invest wherever they see potential for profit, not out of goodness of their heart so I don't see the connection.

Wouldn't that be the goal of any investor? foreign or not?
NorthMancPolak 4 | 642  
22 Oct 2010 /  #36
Outside of Poland is there a reason to learn Polish,,probably not??
In Chicago it could be helpful, not anywhere else in the US or the rest of the world for that matter. Why would anybody want to learn a language that you will never use unless you move to Poland? If I were to do that, I would be studying for months beforehand out of respect.

Are you referring to people who aren't from Poland, but are of Polish origin (like me), or people who aren't?

If it's the former, I totally disagree - there's plenty of places (in Europe, at least) where Polish is useful. I've found it an incredibly useful language, and if I had children, there is absolutely no doubt that they would be taught to speak Polish, whether my partner was Polish or not (hopefully not, lol :D ).

If, however, you meant the latter, then I totally agree - particularly if you're planning on moving there or to go on holiday there, and like to do as I do when going abroad (learn a language out of respect/curiosity, etc).
guesswho 4 | 1272  
22 Oct 2010 /  #37
there's plenty of places (in Europe, at least) where Polish is useful

Other then Poland? Where?
I visited most of the European countries, I haven't heard anyone speaking Polish other than in Poland.

and if I had children, there is absolutely no doubt that they would be taught to speak Polish

Of course, you are Polish and/or you have a Polish background but why would a foreigner do it unless he plans to live in Poland for a long period of time?
convex 20 | 3928  
22 Oct 2010 /  #38
I visited most of the European countries, I haven't heard anyone speaking Polish other than in Poland.

Lots in Germany, heh, and the UK for that matter. It's also nice for basic communication in the Ukraine, Slovakia, the Czech Republic. In Siberia, there were a couple of Polish speakers as well. It's not the most useful language, but it doesn't hurt.

Quite a few foreigners don't bother, especially if they don't need to. I'm guilty of that to an extent.
southern 73 | 7059  
22 Oct 2010 /  #39
And Germans when in the mood start speaking polish.
guesswho 4 | 1272  
22 Oct 2010 /  #40
Lots in Germany, heh, and the UK for that matter

We're talking about two different things. Sorry, about confusing you. I'm talking about the necessity of knowing Polish in those countries and you're talking about a possibility of coming across a Pole in one of these countries. Huge difference !

Besides, I don't know how it is in UK but in Germany, unless you really look for a Pole, you won't necessarily find him. With Turks, that's another story.

t's also nice for basic communication in the Ukraine, Slovakia, the Czech Republic. In Siberia, there were a couple of Polish speakers as well

Never been to Siberia (thank God), I associate it with Gulags and it's not a place to be ;-)

And Germans when in the mood start speaking polish.

lol
Bzibzioh  
22 Oct 2010 /  #41
I visited most of the European countries, I haven't heard anyone speaking Polish other than in Poland.

Maybe because they were trying to speak to yo their local language? Poles are everywhere, even when you don't expect them to be. I've experienced couple of funny stories with that.
guesswho 4 | 1272  
22 Oct 2010 /  #42
Maybe because they were trying to speak to yo their local language?

Maybe I just didn't know if they were Poles or not, when they spoke to me, it was either English or German. No one ever offered Polish (unless in Poland of course).

Poles are everywhere, even when you don't expect them to be.

Agree but most of them (once live abroad) know one of the popular languages.
Havok 10 | 902  
16 Nov 2010 /  #44
the time of the day, temperature, humidity and a smile

LMAO, are you stoned all the time over there? that's a good one.

a smile... :D

Something about Polish Hi and a smile...

When you smile in the streets people automatically assume that you're laughing at someone. It’s not nice to laugh at people, you know…. , “why and who is he laughing at? damn as$hole”

just ignore all people that you don't know and that may be looking at you for some reason. You say hi to someone you don’t know and they're going to assume that you're messing with them.

I like that Israeli kid. Although i didn't like his comment about sandals and socks.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2429  
16 Nov 2010 /  #45
I like that Israeli kid. Although i didn't like his comment about sandals and socks.

Yea he seamed ok, not one of them Israelis who's parents or grandparents came from Poland and have some hatred for us because of what happened to his people in our country, he actually identifies himself as Polish u hear him talk about his Polish mother.
Maybe 12 | 409  
16 Nov 2010 /  #46
I'm learning Polish i have been for three years, i cannot write Polish but I can read it a bit and my Polish is communicative and getting better. I have found that when i do speak Polish it is well received the Poles are pleased that I am trying to use their lingo, it boils down to being respectful towards the people, culture and country. (Which despite my rants I am).

Clearly I speak God's own language English and the Devil's, French and both fluently. ;)
I love languages, I wish I could speak more. Once I have reached a proficient Polish level, I would like to focus on Slovakian and Czech and eventually try Russian.

I had a teacher at school who spoke seven languages, brilliant what a mind.
malgo - | 1  
16 Nov 2010 /  #47
Hi, I`m looking for a person who wants to learn, improve her/his Polish language. I`m learning English and I have to pass my english exam and I really need help. Maybe we can help each other?:) I will be grateful for any help and conversation:)
George8600 10 | 630  
16 Nov 2010 /  #48
That guy looked more like an Arab pennboy...no offense.
jwojcie 2 | 762  
16 Nov 2010 /  #49
No wonder, both Arabs and Israelis originate from the same region more or less... : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semitic
guesswho 4 | 1272  
16 Nov 2010 /  #50
Although i didn't like his comment about sandals and socks

but he's right about it, we don't wear socks to sandals too. Actually, I haven't seen anyone else doing it other than in Poland.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2429  
17 Nov 2010 /  #51
That guy looked more like an Arab pennboy...no offense.

That's how real Jews look like, they're Semitic people, they are related to Arabs just different religions, get your facts straight. European Jews mixed with indigenous Europeans that's why they look more white.
George8600 10 | 630  
17 Nov 2010 /  #52
get your facts straight

I'd like to, but not get beat up when I go to Israel.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2429  
17 Nov 2010 /  #53
Well if they wont admit it they're simply lying to themselves.
Lenka 5 | 3520  
17 Nov 2010 /  #54
When some Pole was going abroad without knowing any language and not trying to learn one I said he was stupid and that's what I think of any person in this kind of situation. However I have to admit that with English it's a little bit different-it's true that's international language and ppl take shortcut.I have to admit I also do that- I know Russian but I immediately speak English-it's just easier that way.

If you're interested in more videos like that from PennBoy you can find them here: polandia.wp.tv/en/index.html

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