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Any english teachers in Poland here with tips to share?


masks98 27 | 289  
15 Jun 2008 /  #1
I just wanted to holler at any English teachers working here in Poland, whether you're Polish or a "native speaker." I think there should be some interesting tips, stories to share no? Anyone fit the description?
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
15 Jun 2008 /  #2
I used to teach English, the most embarrassing thing that happened to eemmm...
It was my first time in Poland, 7 years ago, I was working and wanted to learn Polish and pronounce everyone's name the Polish way. It was all fine, a few tongue twisters, but one day I asked for Barbra, and trying to say it the Polish way I said " Is bara bara here?" well everyone fell around laughing, except one girl, who looked at me as if to say, WTF? I just continued the class as professionally as I could... I found out later Bara bara means something like "a quicky" or "nookey"
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
15 Jun 2008 /  #3
Polish or a "native speaker."

I'm both.
Michal - | 1,865  
15 Jun 2008 /  #4
ust wanted to holler at any English teachers working here in Poland, whether you're Polish or a "native speak

Where in Poland are you? Also, do you enjoy the job? Is it satisfying?
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
15 Jun 2008 /  #5
I am just curious, do native English teachers get such good benefits now as 7 years ago when there were fewer?
The company I worked for bought my plane tickets (3 in total) and this was before cheap flights. I got 4000 zloty a month, it was more then, things were cheaper and they got me a beautiful flat just off rynek glowna in Krakow.
OP masks98 27 | 289  
15 Jun 2008 /  #6
"Bara Bara" good to know...I once misheard what one of my students said, so I said "Kupa" like five times before they nearly passed out laughing (they were kids.) turned out they were talking about someone named "Kuba".

Michal I'm in Warsaw, I got here in February and have been teaching english since then. I never thought I would be caught dead teaching (I hated all my teachers and always made fun of them,) but turns out it's okay, I like the autonomy. The pay isn't epic, but it isn't bad. The demand is huge so I feel pretty secure doing this. No shortage of work. Sometimes I wonder though if my students are learning anything or not. I have no experience as a teacher, but I'm winging it.

However I'm wondering what else I might do besides teach english here? Of course, it would have to relate to english. I'm trying proofreading, I want to see if its possible to get in on some writing for any of the english publications...
scottie1113 7 | 898  
16 Jun 2008 /  #7
I'm from California and I teach English in Gdansk. I love it. You might want to go to esl cafe. and check out the Poland forum. Lots of good stuff there.
OP masks98 27 | 289  
17 Jun 2008 /  #8
I am just curious, do native English teachers get such good benefits now as 7 years ago when there were fewer?
The company I worked for bought my plane tickets (3 in total) and this was before cheap flights. I got 4000 zloty a month, it was more then, things were cheaper and they got me a beautiful flat just off rynek glowna in Krakow.

I didn't see that post before WTF?? I'm almost angry, here I am, paid for my own ticket, had to fight to get my own flat, earning crappy zloty - What school was this that hooked you up like that????
MrBubbles 10 | 614  
17 Jun 2008 /  #9
I'm trying proofreading, I want to see if its possible to get in on some writing for any of the english publications...

You can try, but you need contacts. Get your foot in the door at the BC and start kissing asses. Kiss llike a madman. Do the lecture circuit - IATEFL poland for example. If you can get in at a Uni, that might help with a Polish publisher. Kiss asses. See if you can get in as an examiner (Cambridge ESOL if you have the time). Hang around the luvvies at IH training days. Kiss their asses.

Visit the wonderful english droid. for more info

And don't forget to kiss lots of asses
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
17 Jun 2008 /  #10
Always eat ur vegetables, that's my tip
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
17 Jun 2008 /  #11
What school was this that hooked you up like that????

It was a Callan school, so no lesson preparation, but incredibly repetitive and the guy Callan is a nut. I thought it was a good deal at the time. It was before the BIG change for Poland. I worked with an American and he had to buy his own tickets.
Echidna  
18 Jun 2008 /  #12
My hint:

Be grateful of the opportunity and show it. Tell your students and your school you are grateful to Poland and mean it.

It is really fantastic we can live and work here quite comfortably as English teachers, with little training and without working hard.

We are guests of the Polish people and should always behave as such. I note that some English teachers seem to believe they are doing Poland a favour by being here. I find this really funny but a bit sad. These teachers often end up in difficulty.

Its a great place to live for a few years, or maybe longer.
OP masks98 27 | 289  
18 Jun 2008 /  #13
Well the Poles are our gracious hosts but at the same time we are rendering a service, so no need for either of us to kiss ass, I feel on an equal footing here with my students, I freely tell them what I like, and what I don't like about here, they tell me the same about their views of the US, the whole thing then becomes a stimulating experience for everyone...
Echidna  
19 Jun 2008 /  #14
I guess we have different philosophies and/or backgrounds. Nowhere did I mention kissing anyone's ass and I don't ask for that nor do my students or other Polish people expect that. So it has never become an issue with me. If someone expects that, I would move on. I guess that is tip number 2 - I am trying to stay on topic!

Probably I am a bit sensitive because I have met two English teachers who have been in Poland for about ten years, each who after a few drinks like to tell the Polish people and anyone else who will listen, what is wrong with Poland. Sharing a taxi with such teachers as they accuse the Polish driver of ripping them off of 10 Zloty, which he didn't, I find offensive.

This is their country and after a year I do not know or understand it well enough to tell any locals anything but what I like about Poland. But I work in Zory and most of my students are not so cosmopolitan as perhaps those living Warsaw or Krakow, and the ones I relate best to are generally thirty plus years old and remember the days of communism while living in the new times. It is this transition that I find personally so interesting.

I know from my Australian friends that people in Australia have many misconceptions about Poland and I have inversely found that Polish people know just as little about Australia. I have done two PowerPoint presentations about Australia after classes which have been well received.

I absolutely agree it is stimulating, interesting and great to share experiences of other cultures and it sounds like you get on very well with your students, so keep up the good work.
OP masks98 27 | 289  
19 Jun 2008 /  #15
thanks, good luck to you in Zory, I sometimes get caught up in rants about what I don't like about Poland, some Poles get very defensive, others try to change my perspective by painting a broader picture, others join in and bash their country worse then I ever would. I like all that, it's free speech, anyon should be able to complain about whatever bothers them. But its trut that there are many misconceptions about Poland that are unfortunate, one of them is that Poles love Americans and everything america-related. Not true, American arrogance has made them averse to Americans I'd say.

Like you I really enjoy talking to some of the 30-and-above adults who can share their views about what it was like during communism, and how things aree different today. Things like that make for great discussions.

Anyways, that's all, good luck!
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
19 Jun 2008 /  #16
I used to learn those Poles English, good'n'proper. And it was good craic, sometimes
How long do you spen preparing for a class?

I like all that, it's free speech, anyon should be able to complain about whatever bothers them.

Rubbish, it is just whining and moaning, don't romanticise it to freedom of speech. You are not over-throughing a corrupt and oppressive regime, or is that how you see it? ha ha ha.

And America bashing is a favourite pass time of Europeans, but it is just hot air, America says jump we all ask how high?
OP masks98 27 | 289  
19 Jun 2008 /  #17
"Whining and moaning" & "freedom of speech" are interchangeable to me, so yeah you're right. It doesn't change my point that whining and moaning is perfectly fine. People do it in the US too, americans and foreigners, which is perfectly fine and necessary.

And no I'm not overthrowing a corrupt and oppressive regime, but by exercising your right to ***** and compain, you keep civic spirit alive and the chances of everyone rallying behind some corrupt and oppressive bastard low. As soon as people started complaining about Bush half the idiots in America were like "shut up, if you don't like it you can get out" and the result was a corrupt and aggressive regime. (south park had a hilarious episode about it.)
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
19 Jun 2008 /  #18
It doesn't change my point that whining and moaning is perfectly fine.

God, you would love some of my ex-girlfriends. Ha ha ha ha ha
Rubbish, if you are trying to tell me the positive aspects of moaning a whining, you might as well try to convince me white is black and get killed on the next zebra crossing.

I would understand if it were constructive criticism or if you wrote to your MP or whatever but having a smoke with a student, moaning about their country is just whining.

(I like southpark but I haven't seen that one)
OP masks98 27 | 289  
19 Jun 2008 /  #19
It's the one where they half the ton sings "I'm a little bit country..." and the other half sings "And I'm a lil bit rock n' roll!!" about liberals and conservatives
Michal - | 1,865  
27 Jun 2008 /  #20
f ripping them off of 10 Zloty, which he didn't, I find offensive

They were probably right because Polish taxi drivers ALWAYS rip everybody off!
kiwiboy 3 | 12  
27 Jun 2008 /  #21
Bara bara means something like "a quicky" or "nookey"

#

Some slightly off-topic useless information: if you play 'The Sims' in Polish, you can get the option of having 'Bara bara w łóźku' once you've had a few dates...
Echidna  
27 Jun 2008 /  #22
They were probably right because Polish taxi drivers ALWAYS rip everybody off!

Not in my experience. I have had one taxi driver give me a partial refund after a trip that was 60 Zloty on the meter.
jonas - | 5  
27 Jun 2008 /  #23
Airport mafia or certain drivers will rip you off...if you call a reputable service they are fine...and cheaper.
KatieKasia 3 | 39  
1 Jul 2008 /  #24
I would suggest dont start trying to find work at the begging of the summer, everyone goes on holidays and don't really want lessons!

I hadn't anticipated that one..

x
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
1 Jul 2008 /  #25
Good tip!! Certain groups stay on but the vast majority disband or are temporarily suspended.
Hussar - | 9  
7 Jul 2008 /  #26
Hi all,
I’m in the process of getting my ducks in a row to make my move to Poland...or i should say back to Poland. I left as a kid 20 years ago or so. I recently snapped and left my corporate tech job, coming to the conclusion that life’s too short to and I’m still young enough to leave the rat race and have and adventure or two. As much as a love and support what the US decreasingly stands for, i yearn for change. Anyway, it hit me that I always enjoyed teaching/training people in my former field but don't so much like the field it self. Luckily over the years I’ve become rather proficient in English and learned that it's a hot commodity in Poland, especially when coming from a native speaker or so it would seem.

From what I’ve read here thus far, seems I shouldn't worry much about finding a job and making a decent living...correct?
Any other tips on the job search, the job it's self and perhaps any pitfalls etc. etc. ??
Thanx much all

second...

I work in Zory

If all goes to plan I’ll be working somewhere relatively near you, I'm originally from Jastrzebie Zdroj so I’ll be returning to that general area. Not the prettiest part of Poland by any stretch....though sounds like you like it thus far??

also....
Is there any place in the world where some cab driver won't try to take advantage of a outsider to make lil extra change. Anyone ever been to NYC, as a tourist you're a walking Christmas bonus…. even in July :)

It's just silly to hang such a trivial criticism on a single country...nonsense.
HappyinPoland - | 1  
7 Jul 2008 /  #27
Hi Hussar
I'm lovin it here!!! I lived in Canada for 15 years. USA for 2 years. Born in Ireland and grew up in England; have travelled the world and have found my little heaven here in Poland. Shhhhh!! Don't tell anyone as I don't want everyone to discover this place as it may spoil it.

I think Poland is the worlds best kept secret. But as the Eagles said "Call some place paradise; kiss it goodby"

The money teaching as a native is great and the work is amazingly easy going; Even though I do always give it my all :)

You can expect to make about 4000 zloty a month and 7000 a month if you are prepared to put in the hours. That's 40 hours a week. I know it sounds like a regular job but life really is easier here.

STAY NATIVE!! If you even mention you're Polish; even if it was 20 years ago, your money will drop to about 2000 a month. I know it's not fare but that is the way it is.

Hope that helped and I look forward to talking to you soon.
Hussar - | 9  
7 Jul 2008 /  #28
STAY NATIVE!!

Thanx much for the response, very encouraging…. as I’m gathering info it's mostly positive but you always get the not so positive stories that sneak in and create doubt in your mind. This is a big move for me....come to think of it how have you been able to make all your moves, must be an expert by now hehe. The process is daunting, besides that I am excited about it though.

The STAY NATIVE thing makes sense but i wonder how I’ll be able to pull that off however, with my name and the fact that i am polish....hmm

How long have you been in Poland?
Where in Poland r u ?
OP masks98 27 | 289  
7 Jul 2008 /  #29
one tip, make a point to learn polish as fast as you can, you'l be a hot commodity here, not many native speakers can claim bilingual status here. I missed out on a job for a french company that paid 8000 zlotys a month for french/english speakers who could also speak polish, all for a simple help desk job. So now i've decided to sit down and learn me some popolsku as I like to say :D
ukpolska  
7 Jul 2008 /  #30
I would say this is a very isolated case, as after eight years of living here most of the schools that I have worked for ban the use of Polish in the lesson. Although I would say that it is extremely important to learn even the basics in the country of residency. And if I am not mistaken Hussar is Polish isn't he?

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