Return PolishForums LIVE
  PolishForums Archive :
Archives - 2005-2009 / Work  % width 51

Americans teaching english...your help please!


mark415  
4 Mar 2008 /  #1
Hi everybody!
I'd like to explain my situation and get some suggestions or tips.

I am a first generation American, my parents are from Poland. I have spent summers in Poland and I try to visit whenever I can. It has been kind of a hope of mine to live in Poland and I sort of stumbled upon the idea of teaching english.. it sounds like a decent deal from what I have read on the posts but there are a few things nagging me.

I am a college grad and paying off my loan ($15). I'm sure that there are people out there in the same situation and I would like to know what they are doing about it. The pay for these positions seems ok if you live in Poland but adding in a monthly loan payment could make it hard if not impossible to stay out of the red. So the question is, do you just suck it up and take the loss? Or does anyone know of a deferment option, or someother possibility?

Also, it seems that to land a decent job you should be CELTA or CerTESOL certified, but after researching some programs it looks like I could expect to pay around $2000 for the training course. Ive also seen that you should take the course near the end of summer so that you can finish the course and find work in time to get your residency permit. In that case I would have to buy a ticket in the peak season which is around $1200. Just these expenses to get the job would be around $3200.

From what I have read, most people haven't saved much money working in this job and I know that its not supposed to be a lucrative job, but I am wondering if I could expect to recoup my costs from working as a teacher?

Also I would like to know if anyone has found work in Poland after teaching. I graduated in International Business and was wondering if this would be a position that could produce beneficial contacts.

I think thats it for now... sorry if its a difficult to follow its a getting late here and I just wanted to get this up before my bed time. Your help is welcome unless its to correkt my english :)

oh just thought of something too
about the courses, what would be the cheapest option while still keeping quality. Would it be worth it to take it in prague or anywhere else outside the country?
shewolf 5 | 1,077  
4 Mar 2008 /  #2
Or does anyone know of a deferment option, or someother possibility?

Are your loans government loans? The government allows different kinds of deferments like unemployment, low income and maybe some others. They're easy to get. Just ask your lender.
Harry  
5 Mar 2008 /  #3
If both your parents are Polish, you are also Polish. Contact the nearest Polish consulate and find out about claiming your Polish passport. A Polish passport will make you far more attractive to potential employers because they won't need to go through the hassle of getting you a work permit.

As for training courses: you do need to have either a CELTA or a Trinity Cert TESOL (I'd recommend the CELTA). There are two centres in Poland which run the CELTA: International House in Krakow and International House in Wroclaw (the Krakow school runs courses year-round, Wroclaw is summer only). Both charge in the region of US$1,300. There is also ELS Bell in Warsaw but they do charge US$2,000 for exactly the same course.

As for money, here in Warsaw you'd be looking at about 40 to 45 PLN net per 45 minute class. Work 30 of those a week (i.e 7.30am to 9am and 4.30pm to 7.30pm) and you'll earn 4800 PLN to 5400 PLN per month after tax. Rent on a small apartment in the city centre will be about 1600 PLN so you'll be left with at least 3000 PLN per month to spend. How much are your loan repayments?
scottie1113 7 | 898  
5 Mar 2008 /  #4
oh just thought of something too
about the courses, what would be the cheapest option while still keeping quality. Would it be worth it to take it in prague or anywhere else outside the country?

Harry gives sound advice.

A CELTA is a CELTA regardless of where you get it and the quality of the course is not a function of its location. CELTA is four weeks so no matter where you take it you'll have to pay for a place to live (my flat in Warsaw was 1000 zl for the time I was there), food, transportation and whatever extras you want.
lost in poland  
6 Mar 2008 /  #5
I ve been kiving in Poland for nearly six months and I can tell you that if you are planning to teach English ,you, as a native speaker you will do it very well.Cost of living in Poland is much cheaper than in the States and other european countries, so you will make really good money for polish standards.Besides, if you are a savy saver you will be able to save money to pay off your loan. Poles are crazy about English native speakers. Even when you don't have a certification or teaching background, you can still make it. I ve heard that many people specially from Canada and Nigeria teach in language schools where the best card to pull out is your native language card. So, go for it. Poles are extremelly nice they are always willing to help foreigners. One tip.

As soon as you register in a Polish language couse, at any school, you'll get authomatically a visa period extencion of at least 4 months. The courses vary according to the school were you register, but most of them are around 400-600 for 4 to 6 months.

Good luck.
TheKruk 3 | 308  
6 Mar 2008 /  #6
You can do some TESOL classes online for $200 or so. I taught for years without any certification this was in Katowice where the need for teachers (Native Speakers) is great.

I kept my job because I was good. I had my student loans deferred but it took some convincing and some paperwork from my boss in Poland. Check out Empik Schools they pay well and care about their teachers. Also you can look for Callan schools you need no certificate but its a method that gets tedious, and beware of TOP English School in Katowice the boss is slimy. If you really want to live in Poland and teach go to a city that is less popular than Warsaw or Krakow as they are already chock full of native speakers so training and certificates are more necessary in those places. I recommend Katowice as per your other degree in business, as you could open up other oportunities by teaching, and meeting people. It is not a pretty city but it is growing and many corporations are opening offices there as it is cheaper than Krakow but close to Krakow.
OP mark415  
9 Mar 2008 /  #7
thanks for the tips, definately alot of good advice here. I guess the only question left is which city to live in? I've been to alot of the larger cities in Poland but I've never experienced the nightlife outside of Krakow. So, which of the larger cities would be considered tops for young people?
Foreigner4 12 | 1,769  
9 Mar 2008 /  #8
Go north imo, much more international and scenic. The tri-city area seems like the place to be.
Harry  
9 Mar 2008 /  #9
I guess the only question left is which city to live in? I've been to alot of the larger cities in Poland but I've never experienced the nightlife outside of Krakow. So, which of the larger cities would be considered tops for young people?

Demand for native speaker teachers is highest in Warsaw. Cost of living is also the highest in Poland but the wages tend to make up for that.
OP mark415  
10 Mar 2008 /  #10
As for money, here in Warsaw you'd be looking at about 40 to 45 PLN net per 45 minute class. Work 30 of those a week (i.e 7.30am to 9am and 4.30pm to 7.30pm) and you'll earn 4800 PLN to 5400 PLN per month after tax. Rent on a small apartment in the city centre will be about 1600 PLN so you'll be left with at least 3000 PLN per month to spend.

I just wanted to get some clarification on that number, is that before or after tax?

On another note, has anyone had a teaching job lead to something bigger and better? I would like this to atleast be good work experience if the pay isn't great.

I just wanted to get some clarification on that number, is that before or after tax?

I am an idiot please forget that
Guest  
26 Jun 2008 /  #11
I've heard Poland is cracking down on Americans teaching English in Poland illegally. I have also heard that because of the EU, and the declining dollar, that Poles now prefer British English teachers anyway and that Americans are a kind of pest to be deported. Any thoughts?
dcchris 8 | 432  
28 Jun 2008 /  #12
From my understanding you dont need a work permit to teach english. As far as being American I am and you have to apply for permission to stay which is similar to a green card in the states. It took me 6 months and alot of paperwork to get it but I got two years. But you should apply for your polish citizenship and passport at the same time and that would make your life much easier. I guess lots of americans go across some border every 3 months which seems rather risky to me but thats their choice or they just stay. I dont know. Some schools do prefer EU citizens but I am sure you can find work. pm me if you want to know about work in warsaw

I've heard Poland is cracking down on Americans teaching English in Poland illegally. I have also heard that because of the EU, and the declining dollar, that Poles now prefer British English teachers anyway and that Americans are a kind of pest to be deported. Any thoughts?

I dont see the connection with the declining dollar and deporting Americans...
Archer19  
28 Jul 2008 /  #13
I am also a US citizen interested in teaching in Poland. I have a teaching license in my home state in Elementary Education and a BS in Elementary Education. Do I have a good chance of finding a teaching job in Poland? I am also over 40 - do schools want mature teachers? I am interested in living in Europe and traveling during vacations. What are good schools and areas to look at in Poland?
wildrover 98 | 4,451  
28 Jul 2008 /  #14
I never yet met an American who could speak English....let alone teach it....!!!! Only kidding guys , but it is a different language.....
tornado2007 11 | 2,274  
28 Jul 2008 /  #15
I never yet met an American who could speak English....let alone teach it....!!!!

i thought that bit was fine :)

Only kidding guys

that bit spoilt the post :)

but it is a different language

that is a fact, English and American/English are classed as different languages
miranda  
28 Jul 2008 /  #16
that is a fact, English and American/English are classed as different languages

how so?
tornado2007 11 | 2,274  
28 Jul 2008 /  #17
well on most language forms etc, English and American/English are seperate, even on the PC's now-a-days there is a different selection for each.
miranda  
28 Jul 2008 /  #18
give me an example
tornado2007 11 | 2,274  
28 Jul 2008 /  #19
what do you mean?? you want a link or a screenshot or something?? do you realise its like 1 30 am here!!! Its hard work for that time of morning. Maybe tommorow if thats ok Queeny :):)
miranda  
28 Jul 2008 /  #20
do you realise its like 1 30 am here!!!

oops, I didn't. Have a nice night:)
wildrover 98 | 4,451  
28 Jul 2008 /  #21
give me an example

USA....bum.....is a tramp...UK.....its an arse....
USA....tramp....is a prostitute.....UK...its a homeless person...
USA....fanny....is an arse....UK....its a vagina....Shall i go on.....
miranda  
28 Jul 2008 /  #22
.Shall i go on.....

no, I can look it up. Thanks
wildrover 98 | 4,451  
28 Jul 2008 /  #23
I have an American dictionary here that a friend in USA sent me....trust me...its not English language.....
miranda  
28 Jul 2008 /  #24
its not English language.....

that is news to me, I use both and there are not to many differances if you ask me, but I guess I am used to American E and take it for granted. I have spoken to Brits and never had any problems. Maybe they were not Brits?
wildrover 98 | 4,451  
29 Jul 2008 /  #25
and there are not to many differances

Its easy enough to understand each other , but there are a lot of differences....

USA... trunk......UK....car boot
USA.....hood.....UK....bonnet
USA....fender......UK.....bumper
USA....windshield.....UK....windscreen....
USA....sidewalk.....UK....pavement.....
USA.....elevator.....UK....lift.....

The list is endless.....like you i don,t have a problem , as i have lived in the USA......and most Brits are familiar with the USA language as we see so many American films in the UK....
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
29 Jul 2008 /  #26
USA -Color - English - Colour
USA - Neighbor - English - Neighbour

Quite a few spellings are different.
ArcticPaul 38 | 233  
29 Jul 2008 /  #27
Within the North of England there are loads of different area slang words but we all speak English....just like North Americans.
ukpolska  
29 Jul 2008 /  #28
Some differences between GB and US English are extremely important, for example you would never ask for a fag in the US, unless of course you are of that persuasion, because fag in GB English is slang for cigarette. eeeek :)
davidpeake 14 | 451  
29 Jul 2008 /  #29
how about thong.. 2 meanings
sapphire 22 | 1,241  
29 Jul 2008 /  #30
how about suspenders and durex?

Archives - 2005-2009 / Work / Americans teaching english...your help please!Archived