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90,000 Scottish Immigrants in Poland!


scarbyirp  
25 Jan 2008 /  #1
No immagination is secretly Polish . . . .

Would it surprise you to know that in the 17thcentury, upwards of 40,000Scots (some figures state 60-90,000) immigrated to Poland? Religious persecution during the protestant reformation led many to leave to a clime which was religiously tolerant (by law since 1573). For others, their reasons were simple: a hope of improving their standards of living thus providing greater prospects for their futures.

sikorskipolishclub.org.uk/newsletter/ScotsDiaspora_English.pdf
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
25 Jan 2008 /  #3
thus the Scotts who settled in Poland and loved kluski assumed the name Mac Klusky (that was for "kluski z makiem")
dtaylor 9 | 823  
25 Jan 2008 /  #4
does anyone think immagration really exists? think about it, polish person going to uk, but unknown to him his great great great great grandfather and mother were british in the first place, so really he would be more entitled to be there yes?
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
25 Jan 2008 /  #5
The Scots had large numbers in Poland a long time ago, being largely settled in and around the Poznan area. We also fought alongside the Poles. I don't think immagration really exists, immigration for sure
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
25 Jan 2008 /  #7
It paints Scots as tax evaders, hehehe. There's a difference between being shrewd and being a criminal tho. Poles, b4 May 2004, flocked to Banff and Macduff in Scotland. My grandmother remembers hearing of their exploits way 50/60 years ago. Nothing is missed in small coastal towns, hehehe
lynda wilcox 1 | 11  
25 Jan 2008 /  #8
So he is a scots, engilsh, polish immigrant then?????????/

If he exists?

If he does then of course he has more right to be whereever he wants to be than anyone else, his type ALWAYS DO.

And what about his imaginary friend?

Chuckle chuckle.
noimmigration  
25 Jan 2008 /  #9
100s of thousands of poles have migrated into scotland in the past two years. How many scots have migrated to poland in the last ten years. ?
NO 14 4 | 44  
25 Jan 2008 /  #10
Who cares "noimmigration"? Why are you even here? I know the answer to your pointless question, do you? I think you will be suprised!
Michal - | 1,865  
26 Jan 2008 /  #11
If he does then of course he has more right to be whereever he wants to be than anyone else, his type ALWAYS DO.

Did your father ever run a fish and chip shop in Surrey? I only ask because she was a Lynda Wilcox and the shop was even banned and closed down by environmental health officers.
OP scarbyirp  
26 Jan 2008 /  #12
100s of thousands of poles have migrated into scotland in the past two years.

Given that say 60,000-90,000 Scots emigrated to Poland in the 1700's, exponentially through birth and marriage there is probably somewhere in the region of 500,000 Poles with Scottish blood today. Maybe, you should go to Glasgow airport arrivals lounge with a big 'WELCOME HOME!' banner.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
24 Feb 2008 /  #13
100s of thousands, a big exaggeration. Over a 100,000 for sure. Not 800,000 for example. Is he still suspended?
Kilkline 1 | 689  
25 Feb 2008 /  #14
For others, their reasons were simple: a hope of improving their standards of living thus providing greater prospects for their futures.

Lol. Maybe they also thought 'Hey, lets go to a land with a less harsh climate that isnt invaded by its neighbours and has a people that doesnt rely on alcohol.'
incubus 1 | 146  
10 Apr 2008 /  #15
LOL

i`m one of the poles with scotch in their blood. ok i meant with scotch blood in their veins :P from my father`s side (he`s from around poznan area) there is a scottish link and i`m not sure exactly what clan my ancestors belonged to as it was my late uncle who did the family tree and when he died in the 80`s the tree got lost (he probably took it with him into his grave or something). so i`m gonna ask my dad to try and do the family tree cuz i really wanna know my scottish roots better cuz all the evidence i got now is the reddish colour of hair that`s ever so popular in my dad`s family.

i`m very proud of my scottish roots that all i really wanted to say :)
Grounded 4 | 99  
10 Apr 2008 /  #16
Glasgow airport arrivals lounge

Ermm its actually Paisley International
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
10 Apr 2008 /  #17
The Scots had large numbers in Poland a long time ago, being largely settled in and around the Poznan area. We also fought alongside the Poles. I don't think immagration really exists, immigration for sure

Could the surname Walla be a Scotish surname by any chance Seanus?
noimmigration  
10 Apr 2008 /  #18
wallace is a scottish surname, walla is not.
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
10 Apr 2008 /  #19
Ahh yes, and it best goes with the name Wiliam... :) Thanks for the response.
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
10 Apr 2008 /  #20
walla is somebody who is employed to do a particluar task Maty

tea walla is somebody who makes the tea
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498  
10 Apr 2008 /  #21
wallace is a scottish surname

the name Wallace may mean "Welsh", or possibly 'foreigner'.

So anyway, William Wallace - one of your heroes noimagination ? - I doubt it.
Mali - | 300  
10 Apr 2008 /  #22
William

William is originally an Old German name. Comes from Wilhelm.

I think Margaret Thatcher is his heroine ;)

So anyway, William Wallace - one of your heroes noimagination ? - I doubt it.

Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
10 Apr 2008 /  #23
I think Margaret Thatcher is his heroine ;)

I think it's Adolf H. and his ideologist, Arthur Rosenberg.
Mali - | 300  
10 Apr 2008 /  #24
LOL! You're right...except that Adolf wasn't British. Noimmigration hates all things (and people) that aren't British. Except that he doesn't seem to be all that popular with the British people on this board. He doesn't realize what an embarrassment he is to his beloved nation.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
10 Apr 2008 /  #25
People like him like to bend the rules, if you know what I mean.
miranda  
10 Apr 2008 /  #26
well, it is possible that his roots are not British at all. He might be the first generation immigrant and those are the worst. I have a friend who is Jamaican, born and raised in London, England and she think that she is white. She is more noble than any noble person, which is quite funny to watch. It is a way of compensating for the first generation immigrant hardships and her parents low paying jobs. So maybe non parents were cleaners. He also dosen't really value women in general. He has got a lot of anxieties and isecurities, but who wants to put up with this s**t.
Daisy 3 | 1,227  
10 Apr 2008 /  #27
Nah, you're both wrong, Alf Garnett is his inspiration.
Mali - | 300  
10 Apr 2008 /  #28
well, it is possible that his roots are not British at all.

You`re probably right. Noimmigration is probably a child of Eastern European immigrants and is feeling the competition lol!
I feel sorry for anyone that has to put up with him on a daily basis.

Nah, you're both wrong, Alf Garnett is his inspiration

OMG!!! That is soooo funny!
Noimmigration, you're famous!
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
10 Apr 2008 /  #29
Interesting. My childhood best friends name was Wala. They knew for certain that this name has been altered by their grandfather and prevoius to that change it was spelled Walla. Whether this was the original they didn't know. Since we live near Poznan I just thought that they may have some Scotish ancestors. Is the term walla an english term?
osiol 55 | 3,922  
10 Apr 2008 /  #30
the name Wallace may mean "Welsh", or possibly 'foreigner'

Lots of people were described as Wlesh, or various different forms of the word.
There was a group of Celts the Romans cvalled Volcae. (Ask Crow, he'll tell you they were Slavs). The name was borrowed into Germanic as *walkhaz to mean Celts generally.

This word gave us the modern names of Wales (and derived surnames such as Wallace), Walloons (French-speaking Belgians) and Vlachs (various Romanian groups). In Polish, the Vlachs are called Wołosi (or is that Wołosi?). Does anyone know if that is anything to do with why Italy is called Włochy, and why is that plural (if I got that right)?

Anyway, southern Scotland was in Roman times inhabited by Brythonic speakers (Welsh) rather than Goidelic speakers (Scots, Irish). So Scotland's heritage is a mixture of Welsh, Irish, Pictish (whatever that means), Roman and Saxon... and Viking... and Norman... and Polish (ha ha!)

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