Return PolishForums LIVE
  PolishForums Archive :
Archives - 2005-2009 / UK, Ireland  % width 64

Father's Day cards banned in Scottish schools


Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163  
28 Jun 2008 /  #1
telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/2176315/Father%27s-Day%20-cards-banned-in-Scottish-schools.html

Thousands of primary pupils were prevented from making Father's Day cards at school for fear of embarrassing classmates who live with single mothers and lesbians.

The politically correct policy was quietly adopted at schools "in the interests of sensitivity" over the growing number of lone-parent and same-sex households.

Aye...
LondonChick 31 | 1,134  
28 Jun 2008 /  #2
Maybe it was also to protect those being raised by two fathers... poor kids would have twice as much work to do.
wildrover 98 | 4,451  
28 Jun 2008 /  #3
politically correct policy

Another example of bloody looney political correctness.....
osiol 55 | 3,922  
28 Jun 2008 /  #4
Will they ban Mother's Day cards for the same reason?

Whatever happened to Fathers For Justice? Surely there are still a few superheroes left that none of them got around to dressing up as.
miranda  
28 Jun 2008 /  #5
The politically correct policy was quietly adopted at schools "in the interests of sensitivity" over the growing number of lone-parent and same-sex households.

as if they are not aware of the fact who their paren(s) is/are
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
20 Jun 2009 /  #6
Lir reminded me of this. Sorry, Greg, PC sometimes has some logic. Still, I don't believe in overly catering for the minorities.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
20 Jun 2009 /  #7
Is there any end to this politically correct nonsense?
niejestemcapita 2 | 561  
20 Jun 2009 /  #8
I dont agreee that this is PC nonsense...seems little point in a class activity which half of them can't do, does there?.....:}and which kids wish to reminded of their loser fathers who have fecked off? (please no offence to good dads!)
Jihozapad  
20 Jun 2009 /  #9
(please no offence to good dads!)

Or dads like mine, who died; making me part of a single-parent family of the type which is rarely mentioned.
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105  
20 Jun 2009 /  #11
seems little point in a class activity which half of them can't do

If we had better funded education we'd be able to provide a service that meant those who didn't want to make Father's Day cards for any reason would be off doing something else with another teacher or assistant.

By not making the cards we're now discriminating against the kids who have Fathers or whose religious or other beliefs or social status allow them to celebrate Father's Day. So it's a vicious circle.

Or dads like mine, who died; making me part of a single-parent family of the type which is rarely mentioned.

That is sad and I am sorry to hear it. However, there was a girl in our class at Primary whose Dad died and every year she still made him a card which she took along to his grave with her Mum.

Is there any end to this politically correct nonsense?

Seems not.
niejestemcapita 2 | 561  
20 Jun 2009 /  #12
those who didn't want to make Father's Day cards for any reason would be off doing something else with another teacher or assistant.

Teacher.."Hello class...OK...everyone who DOESN'T HAVE A DAD can leave the room NOW!!" lol..sweet..
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105  
21 Jun 2009 /  #13
Or discreet discussion with the parents/parent at parents nights, other meetings.
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
21 Jun 2009 /  #14
I dont agreee that this is PC nonsense...seems little point in a class activity which half of them can't do, does there?.....:}and which kids wish to reminded of their loser fathers who have fecked off? (please no offence to good dads!)

Said the divordee! Some kids actually have dads and want to send cards to them! hell, shoud the norm be penalised!
niejestemcapita 2 | 561  
21 Jun 2009 /  #15
I know what youre saying and there is truth in it....but really it all sounds like a waste of teacher time .....waste of time..a bit like this whole thread...

and my kids have a Dad yes, thank you..:)
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
21 Jun 2009 /  #16
Well, it has repercussions for Scots, funnily enough. So, not a waste of time ;)
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105  
21 Jun 2009 /  #17
but really it all sounds like a waste of teacher time

How can creative activity be a waste of teacher time? Especially with young kids.
niejestemcapita 2 | 561  
21 Jun 2009 /  #18
So, not a waste of time ;)

So , Seanus, you don't agree???,,,,,:)
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
21 Jun 2009 /  #19
The golden word in life is balance. If they did it tactfully and caring for sensitivities, I don't see a problem. As long as people don't feel singled out.
szkotja2007 27 | 1,499  
21 Jun 2009 /  #20
By Simon Johnson, Scottish Political Editor
Published: 8:44PM BST 22 Jun 2008

The link is over a year old.

When was the last time the Telegraph printed something positive about Scotland ?

The Telegraph is Britains biggest selling daily "quality" paper with a circultion of 843, 000.

In Scotland it sells around 23, 000. - Enough said.
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105  
21 Jun 2009 /  #21
The golden word in life is balance. If they did it tactfully and caring for sensitivities, I don't see a problem. As long as people don't feel singled out.

Those are good words Seanus. All children in a school should be attended for, not just some.

A whole class doesn't do something because it isn't seen fit for one child. We had a disabled girl in our class at Primary but we weren't stopped from doing PE activities that she couldn't do, she just did different activities that were within her means and she never complained, her parent (mother only) never complained, she was happy doing what she did. In fact, a memory that returns to me now and a friend confirmed is that the kids in our class who didn't have Dads made cards for their Mothers even though it wasn't Mothers Day and to my knowledge and my friends knowledge, no one ever complained about that.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
21 Jun 2009 /  #22
Exactly, it's not about exclusion at all. It's analogous to teaching in that I'd devote a little extra attention to a student who was lagging behind but not at the expense of the learning development of others who have paid the same money.

Outright bans often serve no constructive purpose.
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105  
21 Jun 2009 /  #23
The link is over a year old.

Although still relevant if it's still happening. ;)

I'm with you on that. Which is why extra funding/resources needs to be applied to allow classes to be split, if they have to be, even for short times as card-making.

Outright bans serve no constructive purpose and let's be real here, they are only made to satisfy the parents and sooth them.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
21 Jun 2009 /  #24
True, they are a quick fix solution when different treatment would be helpful. We really need to use our options.
niejestemcapita 2 | 561  
21 Jun 2009 /  #25
they are only made to satisfy the parents and sooth them.

they are made to satisfy the PC lawmakers and adminstrators, IMHO
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105  
21 Jun 2009 /  #26
And that's because of the "complaints" that come from the parents who say that these cards offend them.
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105  
21 Jun 2009 /  #28
Is it?

You think anyone would have cared less about Father's Day cards if some adult hadn't said "I feel offended because I am the gay lesbian lover of a child in this class and all the other children are making Father's Day cards but I am not their Father so I feel these cards are just not PC".

Or

"I feel offended. My child doesn't have a Father, he ran off just moments after conception. I feel my child shouldn't make these cards because I am offended".

No kids ever complained.

It's all coming from adults.

However, kids should recognise the significant adults in their life and if it's two women or two men they should be encouraged to make the cards that way. If it's only their mother or their father then they should be encouraged to reflect their cards that way, not discouraged from making them at all.
szkotja2007 27 | 1,499  
21 Jun 2009 /  #29
Although still relevant if it's still happening. ;)

Is it ?Anyone looked in to seeing if this story is true ?
Kids are still making cards in my area.
wildrover 98 | 4,451  
21 Jun 2009 /  #30
What if you are a test tube baby... do they make a card for test tube day...?

Archives - 2005-2009 / UK, Ireland / Father's Day cards banned in Scottish schoolsArchived