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Polonia in scandinavian countries


Rubin 3 | 11  
8 Mar 2007 /  #1
I am looking for information about polish people living in above countries.
jake  
9 Mar 2007 /  #2
One is a general Polish/scandi forum and one is finland specific.

We are thinking of moving to Finland from the UK English/finnish Polish family)
Any other Poles there?

forum.finlandia.pl

finlandia.pl/
OP Rubin 3 | 11  
9 Mar 2007 /  #3
thanks
I dream to move away from UK
Jaszczolt 1 | 35  
29 Sep 2007 /  #4
Rubin, what would you like to know?
There're pretty many Poles in Denmark, Sweden and probably also Norway - in that order - but Finland is rather ethnic clean.
There must be someone there, however. Poles are everywhere, luckily.

On the island of Sjælland (Zealand), in the capitol-area and north from there - in Northern Zealand - there are pretty many.
There are special schools for Polish kids, to learn about the language, history and culture, and in our local Catholic church there's a special mess - exclusively in Polish, by a Polish priest!
osiol 55 | 3,922  
29 Sep 2007 /  #5
ethnic clean

I'd prefer to call it not ethnically diverse.
The opposite of clean has to be dirty,
and I would never use that word to describe a mix of races or ethnicities.

Finland is, however, home to Finns, Sami and Swedes.
There are also Estonians, other Finno-Ugrians from various parts of Russia, and a few Tatars and Jews.
These days there are also people from other European countries, also some Somali refugees.
Compared to other European countries, Finland is not very ethnically diverse.
Jaszczolt 1 | 35  
29 Sep 2007 /  #6
Osiol, Finland is still one of those countries, which generally suffers very little, when it comes to crime by foreigners.
It's completely different on the other side of the Baltic, in Sweden, fx.

And well, I think all European countries have gotten a portion of the Negro runaways.
As much as the general society are trying to live with the somali's, they're pretty often committing crimes.
It's oke to give them some aid, but at some point they have to go back. Their own actions has in a long period showed that many of them aren't capable of living in a Western society.

- And no, I'm -not- a racist. In Denmark we have crimes committed by Negro's and Muslims every day, and when you constantly see, how the press and the politicians tries to cover it up - and do nothing about it, you become pretty frustrated. -.-
Maxxx Payne 1 | 196  
30 Sep 2007 /  #7
Osiol, Finland is still one of those countries, which generally suffers very little, when it comes to crime by foreigners.
It's completely different on the other side of the Baltic, in Sweden, fx.

but our pc liberal politicians are doing their best to change this country into Finlandistan according to the "Swedish paradise". I really cant see how a Muslim Arab could adapt better to our society than the Poles.

Finland had a Polish queen for a while: Katariina Jagellonica (Katarzyna Jagiellonka) and current head Finnish Catholic Church is Polish: Jozsef Wrobel.

I think Finnish population in general feel symptathetic to Poles but our liberal newspapers are constantly badmouthing Poland. P*sses me off..
osiol 55 | 3,922  
30 Sep 2007 /  #8
gotten a portion of the Negro runaways

often committing crimes

of them aren't capable of living in a Western society

But then you add:

I'm -not- a racist

Yes, you are racist.
Why have you bothered to say that you aren't withh all of your racist comment here.

Crime is commited by people, not by vast swathes of humamnkind that share certain characteristics or origins.
I don't know how it works in Finland - my experience is with the UK.
It is the fault of the state that accepts these people, ghettoises them, prevents them from working, pushes them into the benefits system so that when they can work, they've not encouraged to.
Maxxx Payne 1 | 196  
30 Sep 2007 /  #9
Crime is commited by people, not by vast swathes of humamnkind that share certain characteristics or origins.
I don't know how it works in Finland - my experience is with the UK.
It is the fault of the state that accepts these people, ghettoises them, prevents them from working, pushes them into the benefits system so that when they can work, they've not encouraged to.

I am myself not rascist: I dont dislike anyone for their etnicity, skincolor etc, but culturally I dont like Muslims much. In Muslim countries other religions are not looked well upon, Christians and Jews a bit better than the Buddhists or Hindus for example, but they are still infindels who are supposed to pay special tax for just being non-Muslim. Islamic majority and real multi-culturality are mutally exclusive in real life. I dont see how all the Muslim people coming to West are just going to abandon this attitude when moving here. You must have read about how teachers in British schools are afraid of teaching about the Holocaust because that could "offend Muslims". And didnt Muslim community in Canada demand Sharia law to their neighborhoods.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
30 Sep 2007 /  #10
Cultural differences can cause a lot of difficulties because the differing values can prevent cohesive society.
Not all cultures are equal, but I don't know of any that don't at least have something good to offer.

Muslim countries other religions are not looked well upon

Two baptist churches in a small, well-to-do English village I know look upon eachother as infidels!

I know a small number of Bahais who came from Iran and Iraq. Their religion, being much younger than either Islam or Christianity (neither is it a dodgy sect) is being legislated against in Iran, Egypt, and probably a few other Islamic countries too. These countries' views on much older religions such as Zoroastrianism, seem to be slightly better, but they have a long way to go.

The opinions of individuals are usually more than balanced out by the prevailing attitudes of cultural minorities' religious and community practises, especially when they feel under threat. It does seem strange how some groups of people react to countries that shelter them from opression and war in their own countries.

I don't think the age-old mixture of Finns, Swedes and Sami has been able to teach the Finnish state much about different ethnic groups or different cultures making Finland their home. But I'd be interested to find out more, as I find Finland to be an intereseting country.

Unfortunately, there are no simple answers.
Maxxx Payne 1 | 196  
30 Sep 2007 /  #11
Two baptist churches in a small, well-to-do English village I know look upon eachother as infidels!

Yes, but this happens in much smaller scale than Muslim vs others and baptists rarely are rarely aggressive towards others. Christian Fundamentalism etc. may be annoying but rarely violent and dangerous.

I know a small number of Bahais who came from Iran and Iraq. Their religion, being much younger than either Islam or Christianity (neither is it a dodgy sect) is being legislated against in Iran, Egypt, and probably a few other Islamic countries too. These countries' views on much older religions such as Zoroastrianism, seem to be slightly better, but they have a long way to go.

This what I was talking about, for example Bahais rarely have superiority complexes towards others, they know how it feels to discriminated against.

I don't think the age-old mixture of Finns, Swedes and Sami has been able to teach the Finnish state much about different ethnic groups or different cultures making Finland their home. But I'd be interested to find out more, as I find Finland to be an intereseting country.

There has been other groups as well, Jews, Muslim Tatars and Russians have integrated well to Finland. WW II even intensified their acceptance to society: they fought along with ethnic Finns and Finn-Swedes.

Unfortunately, there are no simple answers.

yes and the sad thing is immigrants who do adapt to the society suffer from the actions of those who dont adapt.

I don't think the age-old mixture of Finns, Swedes and Sami has been able to teach the Finnish state much about different ethnic groups or different cultures making Finland their home. But I'd be interested to find out more, as I find Finland to be an intereseting country.

well there is one bad thing resulting for Finnish inbreeding: we are not very good-looking people compared to our neighbors ;D
Polson 5 | 1,771  
30 Sep 2007 /  #12
we are not very good-looking people compared to our neighbors

Girls like Räikkönen ;p
katjusha 2 | 8  
19 Oct 2007 /  #13
oh yes, Swedes are the bold and beautiful, especially bold ;) Check out:
Marek 4 | 867  
14 Nov 2007 /  #14
Rubin,

When I was first in Denmark as a young Danish student, I encountered a number of Russian arrivals, but no Poles. Many of the former though didn't even speak a word of Danish, which I found a shame. I suppose, since globalization was just starting back then, they figured they could get by in English. --::)) And that was already 1989!!!

Marek
Jaszczolt 1 | 35  
12 Dec 2007 /  #15
Heh. Yeah, Marek, in Denmark no stranger should talk aloud about a private matter in English. Everybody understand.
Marek 4 | 867  
15 Dec 2007 /  #16
Everyone understands??

Perhaps the exterior of the idea, but hardly ever the irony, flavor, humor or true sense.
I tested your idea once in Copenhagen. Someone commented "I gave him a piece of my mind!", to which I replied "Hope it wasn't the smallest piece!"

Nobody even cracked a smile!
So much for your theory.
jake72  
15 Dec 2007 /  #17
"we are not very good-looking people compared to our neighbors".

Speak for yourself maxx..
I noticed last summer whilst in Finland that there are a lot more Poles there now.
Not just Poles there for the work but lots of people simply having a holiday.
Even met a load of Polish 4x4 drivers from my wifes home town of Koszalin!
Shall we open the first polska delicatessen in Finland?
Finnair fly Gdansk Helsinki in the summer now which should make i easier to get there.
Better than using the smelly old rip off polferry.
Polson 5 | 1,771  
15 Dec 2007 /  #18
"we are not very good-looking people compared to our neighbors".

Speak for yourself maxx..

Hmm...are you Finnish Jake ? ;)

The point is that Finns are not Scandinavian (their western neighbours are). Then they may have not exactly the same look as Swedes and Norwegians for example...But they aren't ugly :)
Marek 4 | 867  
17 Dec 2007 /  #19
Many Finns whom I've met, look almost Baltic with their broad faces, high cheekbones, light eyes and fair hair. Finns actually share much more in common with their Estonian neighbors than with any other Scandinavians, and the former aren't even Baltic (except perhaps by association!), but Uralic, as are the Hungarians, Mordvins and several others.
Polson 5 | 1,771  
17 Dec 2007 /  #20
Uralic, as are the Hungarians

And the Estonians too ;)
Marek 4 | 867  
17 Dec 2007 /  #21
...as I was just saying. - -:)!

Moreover, Finns can understand Estonians, though not always, vice-versa, .........Hungarians??? NO WAY!
The classic linguistic comparison between Finnish and Hungarian is: in Hungarian many 'h'-words ('hal' = fish) become 'k'-words in Finnish ('kal'), or Finnish 'kaasi' -hand is 'kez' in Hungarian.
porta 18 | 297  
17 Dec 2007 /  #22
Poles in Norway: forumnorwegia.net

We have 120000 Poles in Norway so they are pretty easy to find :)
Polson 5 | 1,771  
17 Dec 2007 /  #23
Moreover, Finns can understand Estonians, though not always, vice-versa, .........Hungarians??? NO WAY!
The classic linguistic comparison between Finnish and Hungarian is: in Hungarian many 'h'-words ('hal' = fish) become 'k'-words in Finnish ('kal'), or Finnish 'kaasi' -hand is 'kez' in Hungarian.

It's interesting how those people who are not Indo-Europeans, came to Europe, and ended up separated like that. Like Romania and it's Latin language surrounded by Slavic countries, or Albania and it's specific language...

Great Europe ;)

Poles in Norway:

We have 120000 Poles in Norway so they are pretty easy to find :)

120000 Poles...they are almost as numerous as Norwegians ;P LoL (i know Norway has a pop. of 4,5 million)

I've been on this forum once...i should give it a look again, thanks for the link anyway.

;)

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