Return PolishForums LIVE
  PolishForums Archive :
Archives - 2005-2009 / News  % width 25

Polish people (and language) spreading all over the world?


Curtis 3 | 73  
10 Dec 2007 /  #1
I was in the shower before, and was wondering... With a lot of polish people spreading all over the world, is the future going to be like how britian made the empire etc.

I know it's not really the same, but with polish people all over the world, will more of the world learn polish in future generations, and maybe other countries have polski as their main language, like what happened with english?
plk123 8 | 4,150  
10 Dec 2007 /  #2
doubt it.. poles are pretty much in every country in the world and have been that way for decades/centuries.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
10 Dec 2007 /  #3
It is political dominance more than number of people that spreads a language around the world.

last minute addition to this post:
I have heard non-Polish people in the UK using Polish. I imagine if you are a lone-Lithuanian amongst a team of Polish people working together, you need to find a way to communicate.
polishcanuck 7 | 462  
11 Dec 2007 /  #4
I doubt it, Curtis.

When Poles go abroad they continue speaking Polish, but their children don't always continue with polish customs/traditions. It appears to me (at least here in canada) that Poles do quite a good job in assimilating into the culture of their new homeland. I was born in Poland and still speak the language quite well, but my siblings (who were born here in canada) don't speak Polish; the same goes for many Poles here. Many others marry non-Poles and as a result the language dies out.

Besides, English in the universal language on our planet. Why learn Polish or other languages when you can just do business using english.
Przemas 1 | 101  
12 Dec 2007 /  #5
Odd little thought that is:

The Brits colonized, we Poles are immigrating, big difference.
Eagle20 16 | 119  
13 Dec 2007 /  #6
When Poles go abroad they continue speaking Polish, but their children don't always continue with polish customs/traditions.

It can be difficult to keep a language going. It can all depend on circumstances.
If there are very few people in a particular area speaking that language then there are few opportunities to use it.
Also kids most probably feel if no one else (in my English school) is learning the language then why should I bother.

Some get help from the kids' grandparents, looking after them etc.

I was born in the UK and I was lucky in that I lived in an area with many Poles who got together to provide a Polish School on Saturday mornings.

My Polish isn't brilliant but I get by in most cases. The other day I even managed to help a Pole who did not know English well enough yet to fill out an English school application form for their child.

When I had kids I started to brush up on my Polish and I now send them to a Polish Satuday School not far from us.

They are not too happy about going, but they still go. (I don't feel too bad about sending them as I know that they would otherwise be playing computer games)

If I had not had kids I guess I most probably would have lost most of the language, as it is I speak to them in Polish every day and I also meet more Poles (mostly other kids' parents) then I would have done.

I also try to go to Poland at least every other year, mostly to visit relatives. (Its lucky for me that the UK is not too far from Poland)

My wife is English, she has helped a lot and is happy that the kids are learning Polish. If she had not supported me it would have been a lot harder.

I try to keep up the Polish traditions like Wigilia and make pierogi (or at least my wife makes them with me and the kids helping)

Good luck to anyone learning Polish, trying to keep their Polish going or even trying to get there kids to learn Polish!
Przemas 1 | 101  
14 Dec 2007 /  #7
Eagle, that is great to hear.
telefonitika  
14 Dec 2007 /  #8
Good luck to anyone learning Polish, trying to keep their Polish going or even trying to get there kids to learn Polish!

Am doing ... :D my daughter is british also like me and is wanting to learn polish like me :)
Michal - | 1,865  
14 Dec 2007 /  #9
I imagine if you are a lone-Lithuanian amongst a

Lithuania and Poland used to be joined in an empire and Polish is still spoken in Lvóv-even newspapers are printed in Polish. As someone said above, it is economic dominance over a few centuries that really changes offiial language usage in a foreign country.There are native Welsh speakers all around the World but is New York likely to make it their official number one language?
osiol 55 | 3,922  
14 Dec 2007 /  #10
but is New York likely to make it their official number one language?

I was merely mentioning the fact that more than just Poles are speaking Polish. What makes you think I was suggesting that this gives it any official status? I am aware of the connections between Poland and Lithuania, and I realise that some people from Lithuania may be ethnically Russian, Polish or maybe even something else, a small part of that country's USSR legacy.
OP Curtis 3 | 73  
17 Dec 2007 /  #11
Thanks for the info guys, Kind of realised it isn't going to happen now. :)
Benek - | 12  
17 Dec 2007 /  #12
maybe other countries have polski as their main language

Actually the Polish language is a dying one, sooner or later it will be almost obsolete.
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105  
17 Dec 2007 /  #13
Where is the evidence of that statement?
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,459  
18 Dec 2007 /  #14
Here is why: :):):)
grzegorz brzeczyszczykiewicz
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
18 Dec 2007 /  #15
Actually the Polish language is a dying one, sooner or later it will be almost obsolete.

Could you elaborate on this a little bit? Sounds interesting.

geboren: gmina Chrząszczyżeboszyce, powiat £ękołody. :))
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,459  
18 Dec 2007 /  #16
Hehe....*wipes spit from monitor*

:)
Benek - | 12  
18 Dec 2007 /  #17
Could you elaborate on this a little bit? Sounds interesting.

Less and less people are using the Polish language. Look around in Poland, more and more you see English words incorporated into Polish. Most soccer announcers in Poland, instead of calling it spalony they say offside and so on.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
18 Dec 2007 /  #18
more and more you see English words incorporated into Polish

Count the Anglo-Saxon words in English.
Then also observe what happens to the English language and its position in the world in the future.
donna parker 2 | 5  
1 Aug 2008 /  #19
Merged: How do Poles connect with other Polish or people around the world?

Is facebook prevalent among them? or blogspot.com? Which ones are?
Zgubiony 15 | 1,554  
1 Aug 2008 /  #20
gadu gadu & skype are a couple of others
Wyspianska  
1 Aug 2008 /  #21
smoke signs, pigeons, tam tams etc.
Dice 15 | 452  
8 Aug 2008 /  #22
What are tam tams?
Del boy 20 | 254  
8 Aug 2008 /  #23
same like every nation by using comunicators or some use tele something ( alien knowledge )
Sasha 2 | 1,083  
8 Aug 2008 /  #24
What are tam tams?

Tomtom, gong... Musical instrument. :)
Romain - | 3  
8 Aug 2008 /  #25
More seriously, Gadu Gadu is very popular in Poland and this IM service is peculiar to this country, as far as I know. It has the best-looking emoticons by the way.

Archives - 2005-2009 / News / Polish people (and language) spreading all over the world?Archived